Newbie Question, using both 10/100 + 10/1000 ?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by adamzx3, Feb 11, 2009.

  1. adamzx3 macrumors regular

    adamzx3

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2007
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    #1
    In a small network I would like to upgrade 5 machines to gigabyte. All machines have gigabyte NIC's. The router is a 4 port gigabyte. Now the only bottleneck is the 24 port 10/100 switch networking all the copiers, office pc's and such.

    Can I hookup a 10/1000 switch to the router and have full gigabyte speed or will it slow it down to the 10/100 because the 24 port switch is also hooked into the router?

    The 2 workstations and servers send large files daily and do so pretty slow. ( four 750mb tiff files min, sometimes 32 of those tiffs at a time) So gigabyte would be great.

    Any recommendations for a router under $80-100 that will be better for transferring large files? Newegg has some rackmounts for $60
     
  2. hmmfe macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2003
    #2
    You can do that. The one port on your router will negotiate to 100M but the other ports will still be 1000M.

    I really can't help with your purchase question as I don't use consumer grade stuff even at home. I guess that is a perk of being in the networking biz. I am sure you will find others who will chime in with their favorites.
     
  3. casperghst42 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
    #3
    If speed is a big problem then look into trunking - you use multible 100mb/s drops to increase the speed (not for the single workstation, but for the network as a whole).

    Most switches can do it - if they are a tiny bit intelligent.

    Casper
     
  4. contitego macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2009
    #4
    You can hook up four different switches, or as many ports as you have lan jacks on the router.

    If you are connected 1 gigabyte to 1 gigabyte, it will function at 1 gigabyte. If you are connected 1 gigabyte to 100mb, it will slow down to the slower one. For example, if the printer is on a 100mb connection, it will communicate at 100 since that's the fastest it will function at. Why you would put a printer on a gb port is beyond me.
     
  5. adamzx3 thread starter macrumors regular

    adamzx3

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2007
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    #5
    Thanks for the help guys. I'll definitely pick up a decent gigabit switch then, I wish they would invest more in a business grade model.

    I'll look into trunking, but from what I can dig up, there's too much configuring to do, especially considering the rip server is $40,000 and the other server is driving the DI printing press which costs several hundred thousand. ;)

    The only reason to hook a printer to gigabyte would to speed up transfer/print times....our proofer runs a 24" roll of paper and accepts 1bit tiff image seperations consisting of several gigabytes.......now the secretary's desktop printer.....thats a different story! :D
     
  6. contitego macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2009
    #6
    I was implying the secretary's printer:D No need to hookup the laserjet to a speedy connection.
     

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