Nikon: 55-70mm gap

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by coolgoose, Jan 3, 2011.

  1. coolgoose macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #1
    Hi, I am new to this forum and would like to ask a question regarding my Nikon kit. I was given a new D90 as a Xmas present. The kit included 18-55mm VR and 70-300mm VR. My question to the gurus here is how much of a gap would be this 55-70mm ? I mostly take portraits and pictures inside home with some occasional travel. Would this be a big gap so as to get a 18-105mm or a 18-200mm ? Please let me know if anyone has any suggestions or advice.
    Thanks.
     
  2. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

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    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #2
    I would suggest you have a look at Tokina's 50-135 mm f/2.8 or Sigma's 50-150 mm f/2.8. This will cover the focal lengths most needed for portraits on crop sensors with a rather larger initial aperture. Since you write you're taking most photos indoors and you want to take portraits, you won't miss the focal lengths beyond 150 mm, they're simply too long unless the room is very, very large (think ball room or gym).
     
  3. TWLreal macrumors 6502

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    #3
  4. npropes macrumors member

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    Jul 20, 2010
    #4
    You won't miss the gap from 55mm to 70mm. If you want a lens that covers a large spectrum, get the 18-200mm. Personally I shoot a 10-24mm, 35mm, and the 70-300mm.

    If I'm shooting a lot indoors and don't want to use my external flash, I'll just use the 35mm fixed lens. Placing yourself where you need to be for the shot is really what matters, the equipment won't make the shot, you will.
     
  5. coolgoose thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jan 2, 2011
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    #5
    Thanks a lot for the suggestions. Its nice to know that I do not need to buy any extra lens.
     
  6. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

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    Sendai, Japan
    #6
    I disagree: 50-70 mm are the best focal lengths for normal portraits as they correspond to 80~100 mm, the classical focal lengths for head & shoulder portraits.
     
  7. AML225 macrumors regular

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    Apr 11, 2010
    #7
    I would pick up the Nikon 50mm f/1.8 with the 1.5x DX crop factor this will be great for portraits in all lights and you can't beat the ~$120 price.
     
  8. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

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    SF Bay Area
    #8
    Yup.

    Shoot with what you have. If your gear isn't doing what you need then this experience will both reveal the need and suggest the appropriate solution.
     
  9. FMJPhoto.com macrumors member

    FMJPhoto.com

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    #9
    I think you missed the point of his post.

    He won't miss the GAP, BETWEEN 50 & 70...not 50 & 70 themselves.

    Personally, I shoot with a Sigma 10-20mm (auto & landscape), Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G (walk around/general purpose), Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D (portraits), and a Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 (portraits/sports/events). I don't miss the 51-69mm focal lengths at all.

    But...if you think you MIGHT want to be that lazy as to not take a few steps in front of you, the 24-70mm f/2.8 option is a great lens on a crop sensor body.
     
  10. OreoCookie, Jan 3, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011

    OreoCookie macrumors 68030

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    #10
    That's exactly what I was referring to: a focal length range between 50 and 70 mm (hence the hyphen) rather than two specific focal lengths. And I stand by what I've said: this range is very important for portraits.

    I have a 12-24 mm, a 30 mm, a 50 mm and an 80-200 mm Nikkor. I do miss the focal length range as the 80+ mm are very long indoors, so I basically only have the 50 mm to do indoor portraits. I was thinking of many ways to plug that hole (getting a 60 mm Tamron macro or an old 35-70 mm f/2.8 Nikkor, for instance), but I haven't found a good way to do it. Now that my D80 is no longer working properly, I need to save money for a new body. But yes, I do miss those focal lengths.
     
  11. TWLreal macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Some people need to look at the big picture, no pun intended, when an obvious amateur is given a more than capable camera body with 2 different lenses that cover an equivalent of 27mm to 450mm that he quite possibly won't give a flying F about the gap that people like to call "the classical focal lengths for head & shoulder portraits"

    I mean, really?

    He has more than enough to work with. He can decide what he's missing out on later.

    Beginners should not be restricted by certain arbitrary numbers that you read about on the Internet.
     
  12. El Cabong macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 1, 2008
    #12
    Since the rough APS-C/full frame equivalents are 55/83 and 70/105, you're reasonably well-covered with regard to the preferred portrait focal lengths, which isn't to say that you won't eventually want to cover the gap with another lens. However, doing it now is a bit premature, especially since you've barely had time to break in your new equipment. The best way to figure out if your kit is missing something is to start shooting.

    At this point, if you or anyone else finds major problems with your portraits, I think it'd be safe to say that it isn't because of your lenses, or lack thereof.
     
  13. puckhead193, Jan 3, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011

    puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

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    Location:
    NY
    #13
    question to the OP didn't you get the kit? My kit lens was an 18-105 :confused:
    I'd say go out and shoot, if you feel limited then its time for some new glass. My only suggestion is getting a fast lens
     
  14. joepunk macrumors 68030

    joepunk

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    #14
    Just use your feet for those few extra XXmm that you are missing in the lenses.
     
  15. PantherJeep macrumors member

    PantherJeep

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    Jun 24, 2010
    Location:
    Oceanside, CA
    #15
    There are different kits floating around out there with different lenses included - which is kinda weird IMO, but whatever. For example, when I bought my D90 kit two years ago it came with the 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 and the 55-200mm f/4-5.6 plastic fantastics in the box. It was sold through Costco but bundled by Nikon.

    To the OP, the best way to know if you really need to fill that 55-70mm gap is to go out and shoot with what you have. As has been mentioned, you can save a whole lot of money by using your feet to pick up those focal lengths. Skill & vision trump focal length any day of the week. ;) But if you just feel constrained or restricted without that specific range, you'll want to spend some money on glass. The only way to know for sure is to get out there and start shooting! :)
     

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