Nikon D750 sensor cleaning

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by dimme, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. dimme macrumors 65816

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    #1
    I just got my Nikon D750 back from service for a faulty live view issue. When I sent the camera off I included a body cap when it was returned they did not include it, just wrapped in plastic. I was worried the camera sensor would be dirty, but it looks OK maybe 2 or 3 spots at f22. But that got me thinking. What is the best way to clean the sensor on the D750, do I need to buy anything special? Or does the clean image sensor menu item do the trick?
     
  2. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #2
    Personally I'd leave it to the professionals. I'd be livid if it had come back as you described. I use a blower that I use if there is some dust on the sensor. Lock the mirror up, turn the camera lens mount down and carefully give it a blow. Make sure not to touch the sensor with the tip. Alternatively you can buy a sticky stick.
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Eyelead-S...347?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item3f409c85d3
    I'd not feel confident though.
     
  3. dimme thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #3
    I was, but reading some message boards it seems like they forget the body cap often.
     
  4. JDDavis macrumors 65816

    JDDavis

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    #4
    I don't know if the D750 is more prone to dust on the sensor than my D90 or it's just easier to see because of the resolution but I seem to be experiencing it quite a bit more often then the D90. My D90 was only professionally cleaned once and the spot I had was on the focus screen and not the sensor.

    So far with the D750 keeping the sensor cleaning function on for startup and shutdown seems to help and I've occasionally turned it mount down and used a bulb to blow it out as AFB describes. Seems to help. I still had some spots on recent pics from Wyoming that were noticeable in deep blue skies but they are easy to fix in post.
     
  5. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #5
    Were the spots oil spots? I've had that a few times on my D7100. I'd really hope it stops when I switch to a D750 at the end of the month.
     
  6. r.harris1 macrumors 6502a

    r.harris1

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    #6
    I actually do the cleaning on my D300s. I use a kit from Copper Hill Images but there are others out there. It's much easier than you might think but I also definitely understand the nervousness around it. The hardest part of doing it is getting through the nerves to actually start the first time :). Worth it though, in my opinion, certainly if you find yourself needing to clean semi-frequently. I change lenses a lot when I am out shooting so for me I'm happy with the decision to do in "in-house".
     
  7. JDDavis macrumors 65816

    JDDavis

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    #7
    No, I don't believe so. Only because I've been able to get rid of them. I do need to pay more attention to see if one is still in the same spot. So far I've felt it's just more susceptible for some reason, or perhaps more sensitive to smaller dust than the D90 (as in easier to see in an image in post).

    I have not sent mine back but I do not believe I have the flare issue or any other issues. I have not been able to reproduce it.

    Here's an image that I took recently that I would expect to have the flare issue. Obviously the sun flare (and spots) are from the lens (a 24-85 f2.8-4). If you look in the bottom right you can make out some dust spots that I didn't clean up. This image should really show them because it's in black and white and I really pumped up the structure.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. telecomm macrumors 65816

    telecomm

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    #8
    I think (wet) sensor cleaning is a lot like opening up your computer to install RAM, etc., for the first time on your own—a lot of people are afraid to open up their computer in case they bend a pin, etc., but once you get up the courage to do it yourself you'll probably come away thinking, "wow, that was actually really easy to do."
     
  9. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #9
    I'm only looking on my phone, but are you referring to the round spots in the sky just above the horizon? They look like oil spots to me. They won't appear on every image, but they will pop up in the same place on quite a few. Not sure why. Take some shots of a plain colour (like a blue sky) to check.
    As for the flare issue, if you turn your camera over and look at the tripod mount, does it have a black spot in the base. If so the lens flare issue was resolved before you got it.
     
  10. JDDavis macrumors 65816

    JDDavis

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    #10
    Yeah, they should be just above the horizon in the bottom right of the sky. I'll have to pay a little more attention to see if I have some long term spots but I know I've had spots that I've gotten rid of simply by blowing them off. My D750 is not a black dot version. I'm 99% positive I do not have the flare issue or at least don't take pictures that produce it. (I've tried). Also consider that this image is super prone to seeing any kind of spot because the contrast and structure have been pumped up a ton in NIK SilverFX.

    All I can say is if you Google (insert issue) + (insert camera) you will probably come upon forums where owners are losing their minds over whatever is wrong with their device. There is not much noise out there about the D750 and oil spots so take that for what it's worth. Bottom line is if you want a ridiculously good FF camera that rivals the top end Nikon bodies in many ways for far less than the D750 fits the bill. If you want a really great FF Nikon for even less then go for the D610. If you want to avoid any potential issue with today's DSLRs than don't buy anything. You'll just miss out on a lot of great images.
     
  11. Miltz macrumors 6502

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    #11
    This has nothing to do with your Nikon D750, but for the record My Nikon Coolpix A is completely filled with dust on the sensor. I've only used it 3 times. I'm not sure if it was there when I got it or if it sucked it in. Either way not good. It's visible even at F8. I'm trying to get it exchanged.
     
  12. Cheese&Apple macrumors 68000

    Cheese&Apple

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    #12
    As others have mentioned, sensor cleaning is not that scary or difficult. I did mine a lot (D600 :( ) without problems.

    I think camera manufacturers exaggerate the concern because they don't want people doing stupid things like trying clean it with a paint scraper.

    Get something like this: Lenspen. I got mine on sale for $50.00 Cdn.

    The key to this is the battery operated lighted loupe that allows you to see exactly what you're doing inside that dark cavity. Don't wet clean unless you must (to get rid of something sticky such as oil spots) and don't use a paint scraper or any other implement of destruction.

    ~ Peter
     
  13. kenoh macrumors demi-god

    kenoh

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    #13
    And never give your focus screen a quick wipe as it is incredibly fragile!
     
  14. MCH-1138, Mar 30, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2015

    MCH-1138 macrumors 6502

    MCH-1138

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    #14
    I'll throw in a recommendation for the Sensor Gel Stick (manufactured made by Eyelead), which I believe is the same as the "sticky stick" that AFB linked to. Note that they make a different version for Sony mirrorless cameras (due to coatings on the sensor).

    I have had my D7000 for about 2.5 years, and have not previously cleaned the sensor (other than using the auto-cleaning at start-up and shut-down setting). I had been meaning to buy one of those blowers, but never got around to it. After spending way too much time in post cleaning up the dust spots that I started noticing when shooting hummingbirds at f/16, I decided to give the gel stick a try. It took about 15 minutes (making one full pass over the sensor and a few follow-up dabs after taking a couple of test shots) and couldn't have been any easier (unless someone else did it for me).

    Here are the before and after shots, taken at f/22 with contrast boosted way up...
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #15
    Still think I'll leave it to the pro's. I'm too much of a coward to start attacking my sensor!
    Around our way, local camera shops often put on events with free sensor cleaning. Worth looking into.
     
  16. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #16
    I don't have a Nikon but have cleaned my Canon 5D3 sensor a couple of times. Once, a blower was all it needed, but recently that was insufficient so I bought a pack of sensor cleaning swabs off Amazon and swabbed it.

    There's a glass cover on the sensor so it's not like you're touching the actual sensor anyway (at least with Canon, I assume Nikon would be the same).

    Canon has a great 3-page article on different techniques for cleaning your sensor that probably applies equally well to Nikon bodies...

    http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/infobank/capturing_the_image/sensor_cleaning.do
     

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