Nikons lenses questions

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by conamor, May 30, 2014.

  1. conamor, May 30, 2014
    Last edited: May 30, 2014

    conamor macrumors 6502

    conamor

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    #1
    Good day!

    I know it's mostly a "digital photography" forum but I thought and ask this.
    Nikon D3200 24.2MP HD Digital SLR with:
    - 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR
    - 35mm f/1.8G
    - 55-300 mm VR (AF-S DX)

    I would like to know, if I want to do a little upgrade on these, what should I keep or replace?

    Should I get a 50mm instead of the 35mm?
    Why is there a 18-200 at 700$ and a 18-200 at 300$? (I suppose I don't really need them with what I have) you let me know ;)
    18-140?
    or all your suggestions

    Is my camera better than something like a nikon 1? or Mirroless cameras?

    I like to do portrait, animals and "normal pictures" as you would do with a point-n-shoot.

    Thanks for all the tips!
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    #2
    Your post covers a massive amount of topics.

    You have a pretty good setup there. Its heavier but better than the nikon 1 system in several ways.

    The nikon1 is a mirrorless system, but some mirrorless are considered to be superior (sony7a), some are not.

    You could get a 70-300 for the extra reach because it amounts to 105 - 450 on your body.
     
  3. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #3
    I'm an ex D3200 so let me me try and help. Your camera is better than the Nikon 1 but only if you use it to its full potential. In other words not in auto mode. The benefit of a DSLR over normal cameras (other than interchangeable lenses) is the ability to control your ISO, aperture and shutter speed. So you can blur backgrounds or use a long exposure.
    Your lenses have a pretty good range. The different lenses have different Apertures (F numbers). The lower the number the better the lense. That's why Nikon sell the same focal range at different price points.
    Something like a 2.8 on a telephoto or 1.8 on a prime, is a good lense.
    I have the 18-55 you have, and despite being a kit lense it is pretty good in reasonable light.
    I think you would be better of investing in learning to use what you have rather than buy more equipment.
     
  4. conamor thread starter macrumors 6502

    conamor

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    Jun 27, 2013
    #4
    I already have a 55-300, are there any differences between the 70-300 and the 55-300?
     
  5. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    Behind the Lens, UK
  6. conamor thread starter macrumors 6502

    conamor

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    Jun 27, 2013
    #6
    Thanks a lot, I will have a look at the website ;)
     
  7. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
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    #7
    The 55-300 has a bit more lens distortion than the 70-300. However look through your photos and see which focal length you use the most. You can see it in the EXIF data.

    ----------

    If you like his style, he does a review of your camera as well. Helps you know what all those buttons and menus do!

    http://froknowsphoto.com/nikon-d3200-review/
     
  8. Meister Suspended

    Meister

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    #8
    I think the 55-300 is dx. The 70-300 is fx. Hence the 70-300 translates to 105-450 on your body!

    Also check out matt granger (thatnikonguy) on youtube.
     
  9. chmilar macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2003
    #9
    A lens' focal length in mm is always the same. It does not change, regardless of what camera you mount it on. What changes is the crop that your camera takes from the image circle.

    So the 300mm of the 55-300 is exactly the same as the 300mm of the 70-300.
     
  10. besler3035 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    #10
    Def. get rid of the 18-55. That's not worth anything. Whatever you get next, I'd get a fixed aperture lens. That takes care of worrying about that when you are shooting.

    What I would recommend is getting a lens that would work with a full-frame (FX) camera body. That way it can stand the test of time, and you can continue to use it as you grow your setup. I've got a Sigma 50mm f/1.4 and LOVE it (not the art lens, the old version) on my D800.
     
  11. ssmed macrumors 6502

    ssmed

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #11
    What does your current equipment not do that you would like it to do?

    You could consider new equipment being...
    1. Better in low light and isolation of the subject
    larger aperture or longer focal length
    2. Better bokeh (background definition)
    often more expensive lenses
    3. More versatile
    greater zoom capacity

    I would be tempted to buy a decent flash (e.g. D910 or similar) and add that to your kit unless you can identify a clear need and want to extend your capabilities.

    HTH
     
  12. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    Oct 10, 2013
    #12
    Whats the point of your post?
     
  13. MCH-1138, May 30, 2014
    Last edited: May 30, 2014

    MCH-1138 macrumors 6502

    MCH-1138

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
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    California
    #13
    He is saying that any 300mm lens on a D3200 will give you the same 450mm (full-frame equivalent) field of view, whether it is a 55-300 (DX lens), 70-300 (FX lens), or ultra-expensive 300mm f/2.8. The DX sensor is what creates the crop factor, not the lens.

    So although the 70-300 may have other redeeming qualities over the 55-300, there is no difference between the two with regard to the reach at the long end of the zoom range.
     
  14. Meister Suspended

    Meister

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    #14
    I have never owned a crop sensor (except a point and shoot).
    I only know medium format film and 35mm film / digital.

    As I think about it you are right. No difference in focal length.


    Thx for correcting me!
     
  15. NukeIT macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    #15
    Just because 2 lens have the same focal lengths does not mean they do the job the same. Focal point is only 1 aspect of the lens.

    Apeture would be another, construction quailty, body material, etc.

    Not always but for the most part you get what to pay for, cheaper telephotos tend to be soft, especially on the extremes of their focal range and toward the edges of the frame.
     
  16. puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #16
    The fro is good, but recently his reviews have been lack-luster. He used to do like 30 min reviews on gear and now it's down to only a few and mostly does unboxings and a few test images...
     
  17. BayouTiger macrumors regular

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    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    New Orleans
    #17
    Once I got the 18-200 for my D300 the 18-55 and 55-300 never once hit the body again. The more expensive version has a much better mount and glass.

    As for mirrorless, The Nikon 1 has really fast focus, but is limited in lenses. I switched from the D300 to the Olympus OM-D (first the EP5 then the EP1) and have never looked back. Amazing cameras, excellent selection of reasonable priced glass, and solo much less bulk and weight. I would never switch back from m43!
     
  18. mystic man macrumors member

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    Nov 1, 2009
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    #18
    to be precise, Meister is actually correct, using a 300mm lens on a DX camera, is as if shooting with a 450mm on a FX camera, so his comment is correct.

    To have the same effect as a 300mm on a DX camera you would need a 450mm lense on a FX camera. Why not everyone uses an DX camera then? Because on a Full Frame, you get much more detail

    conamor, to answer your question, those are great starter lenses, you re going to fall in love with the 35mm 1.8. If you have never taken on photography before, I would advice you to learn the basics, like the exposure triangle, Aperture, Shutter and ISO, and then focus on Composition, Lighting, and just go wild with it. Happy shooting
     
  19. BayouTiger macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    New Orleans
    #19
    I would also say to avoid the magic bullet attitude where you take hundreds of photos hoping to get one. When you do so, as a beginner, it's too easy to lose track of those things you mentioned. Limiting your number makes you concentrate on exposure and composition.
     
  20. admwright macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Location:
    Scotland
    #20
    You have a good camera and a versatile lens selection, covering most requirements. You need to ask yourself what you are finding limiting with your current setup. If you know what you are having problems with then you can more clearly target how to resolve that problem. You mention the 50mm to replace the 35mm, now if you use the 35mm indoors I think that you will find the 50mm too long unless the rooms are big or you are looking to just do head portraits. Let us know where you are limited and you will get better suggestions.

    All the best
    Andrew W.
     
  21. conamor thread starter macrumors 6502

    conamor

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    #21
    Good day,

    Thanks for all the comments.
    I actually have no problem with the lenses. Probably wanted to upgrade them to have a better image quality since like you said, I cover every range and do love the 300 (in a zoo, I can get monkeys in trees, far far away).

    I think my problem is the light. When indoor, I use my sb-400 aiming at the ceiling. I bought a diffuser for it and did test taking picture aiming the flash at the subject with diffuser then at the ceilling with diffuser, not much more difference, same without diffuser...

    If I aim at the subject with the flash, of course, the skin is extremely white.

    I did buy a cowboy studio kit with backdrops, mounting and 2 lights with umbrella but that was a kit at 200$. It didn't do much since I have wrinkles behind the subject...

    I do know that I have a lot to learn for aperture, iso, etc...

    Thanks for all the comments
     
  22. dimme macrumors 65816

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    Feb 14, 2007
    Location:
    SF, CA
    #22
    It looks like you have a nice setup. I say keep what you have and enjoy it.
     
  23. chmilar macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2003
    #23
    He was talking about using both lenses (55-300mm, 70-300mm) on a DX camera. To be clear, both lenses set at 300mm on a DX camera will have exactly the same field of view.
     
  24. nburwell macrumors 68040

    nburwell

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    Location:
    PHL
    #24
    I would second this.

    To the OP, it sounds like you are just getting into photography, and just like taking pictures for fun. I would say keep with you have listed, while learning the in's and out's of your camera. If you really think your lenses are holding you back somehow, then maybe you should think about upgrading them. But I really don't think that is the case.

    Get out and use your camera and lenses you have as much as you can. Try to stay away from shooting in auto mode. Experiment in 'P' or program mode, then when you feel comfortable there, move to 'A' or aperture priority. There is also countless information contain on the internet and your camera manual.
     
  25. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #25
    Is the flash attached to the camera or off camera. Get your self a separate cable or wireless trigger and mount the flash on a tripod to the side (with your defuser).
    Also what are you doing about white balance? When using your flash you need to change your white balance settings.
    Post some pictures so people more skilled than me can offer some advice.
     

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