Nintendo DS? PSP? No. It's all about iPhone (and iPad) gaming

*LTD*

macrumors G4
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http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-10465246-52.html

At GDC, iPhone game development breaks out

"For years, GDC, as it's known, has hosted two days of 'summits' early in the week, before the main keynote address and the bulk of the panels and sessions begin, including the longstanding GDC Mobile, which dealt with just about every issue a developer could want on mobile and handheld devices," Daniel Terdiman reports for CNET.

"And this year is no exception," Terdiman reports. "But strikingly absent among those 18 panels are any that deal with game development specifically for the iPhone. And why? Because for the first time, the GDC advisory board decided that Apple's smartphone is an important enough platform to warrant its own summit."

Terdiman reports, "As a result, on Tuesday and Wednesday, hundreds--if not thousands--of people will shuffle into the 16 panels and discussions that make up the iPhone Games summit, sessions like 'How to keep your game on top of the charts;' 'Fastest path from concept to Top Paid;' 'A big dash of success: how to capture the female iPhone gamer' and more. There don't appear to be any talks surrounding games and the iPad, but the release of Apple's much-anticipated tablet on April 3 is certain to be yet another major step forward for iPhone OS as a game platform."


But to Ngmoco's Jeffrey, the game industry's tide has unquestionably shifted in the last few years, and not in a way that favors the continued emphasis at events like GDC on large-scale development for console platforms like those created by Nintendo, Sony or Microsoft.

"Two years ago, the excitement was around $25 million games and mobile as an industry was on the way out," he said. "Two years on, we've seen a complete flip-flop. The sexy emergent part of gaming...is next-gen mobile, led by the iPhone. The focus is on $250,000 games [now], rather than $25 million."
 

maflynn

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So what's your point. They decided to to give the iPhone its own summit.

In no way does that relay any sort of negative connotation with the DS
 

LethalWolfe

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So what's your point. They decided to to give the iPhone its own summit.
His point is the same as always, Apple is teh awesome, everything they do is teh awesome and everyone else is teh sux.

That is kinda the great thing about the threads he starts is that you don't even need to click on them to know what it's about.

Lethal
 

roadbloc

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The Nintendo DS is going nowhere. The iPod/iPhone is a media player and/or phone.

No-one buys a iPod/iPhone with gaming in mind. It's a lovely touch to a great product, but not at all the reason why it is recognised.
 

NoSmokingBandit

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As an avid gamer i cant help but laugh at anyone who thinks the iPod/iPhone/iPad offer any kind of competition to the giants that are Nintendo and Sony.

Compared to the iPod touch the DS has better controls, better/more games, and is cheaper by quite a few dollars. I have never even considered an iPod for games. The idea that it is a legitimate gaming platform is just ridiculous.

Though i suppose i shouldnt expect anything more than nonsensical apple praises spewing from LTD.
 

roadbloc

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You don't count.

I know no-one who would. They would buy a recognised games console or a PC to play games. iPod/iPhone would be for playing music and calling people. Why on earth are you in this mind set? What advantage does an iP(x) have for gaming? None. That would be because they are not designed or used for gaming alone.
 

maflynn

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The iPod touch/iPhone's gaming capability is a plus, but apple didn't develop the device as a handhold gaming device and the controls show this.

I enjoy playing games on my iPhone but I did not buy one (nor do I know anyone who did) just so they can play games. Yeah, there's probably the odd duck who done that, but their more of the exception then the rule.

I have kids, I also interact with parents and other kids. Not one of them wants an iPod touch for gaming but they all own a DS.
 

Gold89

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You don't count.

I know no-one who would. They would buy a recognised games console or a PC to play games. iPod/iPhone would be for playing music and calling people. Why on earth are you in this mind set? What advantage does an iP(x) have for gaming? None. That would be because they are not designed or used for gaming alone.
People are buying iPhones and touches for gaming. The number of people I see passing around their iPod/Phone with a simple fun game on it is huge. People, with perhaps the exception of the geeks/younger ones of us aren't going to go and buy a handheld console and carry it round in their suit pocket.

But thousands of people carry an iPhone around with them just because they can play a few games now and then whilst on the train, etc and it's so simple.


After all there's an app for that. ;)
 

belvdr

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That's quite a persuasive argument backed up with some iron clad statistics :rolleyes:
Of course it is. Look at the numerous threads he has created. :D Every thread says Apple is doing everything right. Doesn't that count?
People are buying iPhones and touches for gaming. The number of people I see passing around their iPod/Phone with a simple fun game on it is huge. People, with perhaps the exception of the geeks/younger ones of us aren't going to go and buy a handheld console and carry it round in their suit pocket.

But thousands of people carry an iPhone around with them just because they can play a few games now and then whilst on the train, etc and it's so simple.


After all there's an app for that. ;)
That's a good point. People tend to stereotype gamers into one class. That's obvious not the case since Nintendo is more about overall fun, whereas Sony and Microsoft are more about the realism. These details were discussed heavily when the "big 3" were launching their new consoles.

In other words, the iPad isn't competing in the same arena as the PSP. As for Nintendo, people seem to love Mario.
 

roadbloc

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People are buying iPhones and touches for gaming. The number of people I see passing around their iPod/Phone with a simple fun game on it is huge. People, with perhaps the exception of the geeks/younger ones of us aren't going to go and buy a handheld console and carry it round in their suit pocket.

But thousands of people carry an iPhone around with them just because they can play a few games now and then whilst on the train, etc and it's so simple.
Well... in that case, I hope you enjoy your cookie-cutter flash games.
 

*LTD*

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LethalWolfe

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I think the iPhone OS will compete in the same gaming market that mobile phone cameras do in the camera market. I think mobile devices will have an impact on the low end because they are convenient, very simple and 'good enough' for many basic, on-the-go uses but I don't see them competing in a significant way against consoles (both home and handheld).

Even arguably the best iPhone game to date, Chinatown Wars, got overwhelming positive reviews but they all had the same basic caveat of 'it's a great game... for a $9.99 iPhone game.' I brought this up in the other iPhone OS gaming thread that *LTD* started a few days ago, but I my big question is, are people going to be willing to pay $30-$60 for games or productivity apps for the mobile OS's (iPhone, Android, WebOS, etc.,)? If not, do software makers have much incentive to go beyond building 99 cent or less apps targeted at the masses?


Lethal
 

roadbloc

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I do know, as my I had a go on my friend's iPhone last week. The games are worse than DS games. (Especially China Town Wars.)
 

ravenvii

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I do know, as my I had a go on my friend's iPhone last week. The games are worse than DS games. (Especially China Town Wars.)
I'm sorry, I don't subscribe to the "Apple is God" kool-aid that *LTD* is, but you're dead wrong. The iPhone has *great* games, and so does the DS. And they both also have horrendous games. Neither are worse than the other. Either you're just in denial, or your friend just buys bad games.
 

*LTD*

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I do know, as my I had a go on my friend's iPhone last week. The games are worse than DS games. (Especially China Town Wars.)
Actually Chinatown Wars is one in particular which users regard as better than the DS version.
 

roadbloc

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Actually Chinatown Wars is one in particular which users regard as better than the DS version.
I have no idea why. Where is your usual generic link that supposidly proves your point? Or are you just announcing your opinion there.

I prefer the DS version anyways.
 

LethalWolfe

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Actually Chinatown Wars is one in particular which users regard as better than the DS version.
Here is my copied and pasted response from the last time you made this statement. Maybe you'll reply this time. ;)


From the other thread:
Also, where were you reading that the iPhone version of Chinatown Wars is the better than the DS version? Pretty much everything I read about it said it was a must have iPhone game but it had a cramped/cluttered screen and poor controls (especially for driving) compared to the DS and PSP versions. But all the negatives are usually covered w/a caveat that it's a $9.99 version on the iPhone/iPod Touch so you can only expect so much. Kinda like how the iPhone's keyboard is very good... for a small, touch screen keyboard.

TouchAracde.com
The main difference is how the controls have been adapted to the on-screen virtual joystick and buttons of the iPhone. Like other games that use a similar control scheme, there is always an inherent lack of precision without physical buttons that take a little getting used to, but this didn't hamper my enjoyment of Chinatown Wars in the least bit.
IGN.com
Chinatown Wars uses a virtual stick for on-foot movement that is just about as good as you'll find on the iDevices. Combat controls would benefit from some sort of targeting system, but I experienced few problems with digging into a violent crew and trading bullets or putting shoe prints on their faces. When driving, though, you default to a pair of arrows for turning left and right, which you use in conjunction with gas and brake pedal buttons. All of the virtual buttons (gas, shoot, kick, carjack) are simply too small. They work -- but they are not easy to manage and often require you look at the buttons to make sure you are hitting the right one.
PocketGamer.co.uk
With a slightly cluttered screen and lack of a targeting system to take up the slack on the controls, it's probably reasonable to say the iPhone version of Chinatown Wars is third in line when it comes to playability.

But when it comes to cost and portability, the DS and PSP aren't even in the running.

Here's a few of new ones too:
PhoneArena.com
Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars for the iPhone is truly a title that deserves your attention, no matter if you happen to be a fan of the computer and console versions of the game or just someone who enjoys fast-paced action. Just like pretty much everything else in life, GTA: Chinatown Wars for the iPhone is not without its shortcomings and the major one is called lack of multiplayer. Yes, we had hoped for tons of fun engaging in in street pursuits in Liberty City with real people, but alas, this is impossible. However, perhaps this is the reason why GTA: Chinatown Wars is significantly cheaper than the editions for Nintendo DS and Sony PSP and can be purchased from the AppStore for the modest $9.99.
Emphasis mine.

ilounge.com
Like virtually everyone else who has tried to port a popular game from another platform to the iPhone and iPod touch, Rockstar struggled a bit with the mandatory virtual controls, primarily when you’re in vehicles: left and right arrows appear by default for steering, along with separate accelerator and reverse buttons, and even if you switch the control scheme to get back the analog stick, driving doesn’t ever feel quite right or precise enough.

ismashphone.com
The music is perhaps less impressive. Gone are the data intensive radio stations made possible by a DVD disc and in their place are a selection of almost incidental jazz, dance and muzak tracks. While inoffensive, GTA Chinatown Wars’ audio element contains little of the character and sassy self-awareness that the series is famous for. Indeed, this element of GTA has always been one of the series’ main conduits for feeding humour into the experience, via the various debate shows and adverts aired on the radio stations, and it’s noticeably lacking here.
That said, one feature the iPhone version does boast is the ability to create your own custom radio station from your iPhone’s music library, simply by creating a new playlist in the iPod section of your iPhone and naming it “GTA”.
Again, great game for $9.99 on the iPhone but would people be as forgiving for the lack of features and control issues if the game cost $20 or $30? If the DS and the PSP had the same short comings would people find it acceptable for those platforms?


Lethal
 

0098386

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Oh look it's another LTD thread.
I don't know if you've played DS or PSP games, but they're considerably better (the majority at least) than the majority of iPhone games. Even the good ones are hindered by poor controls.