nMP wouldn't go to sleep last night ...

Cubemmal

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 13, 2013
824
1
I've had this happen before with the oMP. I don't think any of my Mac laptops did this.

  • Tried Apple Menu>Sleep
  • (did this several times - the display just blanks and it stays awake)
  • Put it on a Scheduled Sleep (Power Settings) in an hour

Went to bed, woke up and the computer was still on. Somebody in another thread was complaining how I said Windows was a more reliable operating system than OS X. Here's an example! This is ridiculous, Windows will go to sleep, every time I tell it, while I get this kind of crud of OS X.

Of course one ridiculous alternative is to reboot the machine.However that disrupts my workflow and is laughable.

I'm going to put a bug report in, any suggestions welcome or reports of similar behavior ...
 

Stephent

macrumors member
Jan 31, 2012
92
0
This isn't common with newborns. My wife and I had many sleepless nights after our daughter was born and refused to sleep through the night. Try some warm milk and rocking your little one gently that may help.
 

puckhead193

macrumors G3
May 25, 2004
9,227
444
NY
What monitor are you using? There is a known bug with NEC monitors and the latest update to mavericks.
 

Cubemmal

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 13, 2013
824
1
What monitor are you using? There is a known bug with NEC monitors and the latest update to mavericks.
All Cinema, two are TB Cinema. The only other device is a Pegasus2.

----------

Personally I find it's most often network devices and services that will prevent sleep, sometimes peripherals too.

There is this Apple KB that helps finding the source of sleep not working.
Apple KB: Mac OS X: Why your Mac might not sleep or stay in sleep mode

I hope it helps you at least find the cause.
Thanks, that may have solved it. I thought I had turned off "allow BT devices to wake the computer" but it was still checked. I had already rebooted and tried to sleep but still no go. Anyhow, after checking that option and telling it to sleep it actually worked this time.

The odd thing is that the only BT devices are an Apple Trackpad and Mouse. Wups, still Apple's problem, but at least I got it to work.
 

SuperMatt

macrumors 6502a
Mar 28, 2002
678
273
All Cinema, two are TB Cinema. The only other device is a Pegasus2.

----------



Thanks, that may have solved it. I thought I had turned off "allow BT devices to wake the computer" but it was still checked. I had already rebooted and tried to sleep but still no go. Anyhow, after checking that option and telling it to sleep it actually worked this time.

The odd thing is that the only BT devices are an Apple Trackpad and Mouse. Wups, still Apple's problem, but at least I got it to work.
If you don't allow the wireless keyboard or mouse to wake the computer, how do you wake it up?
 

CH12671

macrumors 6502
Dec 29, 2013
350
0
Southern US
I've had this happen before with the oMP. I don't think any of my Mac laptops did this.

  • Tried Apple Menu>Sleep
  • (did this several times - the display just blanks and it stays awake)
  • Put it on a Scheduled Sleep (Power Settings) in an hour

Went to bed, woke up and the computer was still on. Somebody in another thread was complaining how I said Windows was a more reliable operating system than OS X. Here's an example! This is ridiculous, Windows will go to sleep, every time I tell it, while I get this kind of crud of OS X.

Of course one ridiculous alternative is to reboot the machine.However that disrupts my workflow and is laughable.

I'm going to put a bug report in, any suggestions welcome or reports of similar behavior ...
That would be me most likely...thanks for the perfect example! Most of the time my Windows PC's would go to sleep, and NOT wake up!

What is there to put to sleep on this thing anyway? There are no hard drives to spin down. I just have mine set to turn the display off after 15 minutes and forget it. I can't imagine idle being any more or less energy consuming than "sleep" on a machine like this....
 

AidenShaw

macrumors P6
Feb 8, 2003
18,133
4,206
The Peninsula
That would be me most likely...thanks for the perfect example! Most of the time my Windows PC's would go to sleep, and NOT wake up!

What is there to put to sleep on this thing anyway? There are no hard drives to spin down. I just have mine set to turn the display off after 15 minutes and forget it. I can't imagine idle being any more or less energy consuming than "sleep" on a machine like this....
A sleeping Xeon uses no power, which is much less power than one that is awake, not even considering the fan to keep it cool.

The power used by a hard drive is small compared to the CPU.

In sleep mode the CPU is powered off, and only a trickle of current is on to keep the memory refreshed.
 

Cubemmal

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 13, 2013
824
1
A sleeping Xeon uses no power, which is much less power than one that is awake, not even considering the fan to keep it cool.

...

In sleep mode the CPU is powered off, and only a trickle of current is on to keep the memory refreshed.
Actually IIRC it's not quite that low. The CPU needs to service interrupts and timers, for one thing. S3 and S4 deep sleep still has a small trickle current I think.
 

CH12671

macrumors 6502
Dec 29, 2013
350
0
Southern US
OK, I gotcha

I don't think this is an OS X Mavericks problem as my MBP sleeps and wakes perfect every time. Maybe it's an OS X vs new hardware issue...or, more likely (as stated earlier) an issue with peripherals.
 

Cubemmal

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 13, 2013
824
1
You can see the Apple philosophy at work here. Microsoft has the attitude that "the user is in control". Unfortunately we get a cruder UI and operating system, and we have to be more knowledgable about how to fix things than we might wish.

The Apple philosophy is "the computer is smart enough". They try everything they can to have the machine figure it out. Here's an example, they have some decisions to make whether to put the computer to sleep or not. Maybe you have some chatty BT, or network, so you don't really want to go to sleep. The problem with this is that the computer can't know what you're really thinking.

There's not to many at this point, but OS X really could stand an improvement in some areas, such as this one. When I actually go to the Apple menu and say sleep, I mean sleep dammit! If you're still doing network business and I interrupt that, it's my fault.
 

CH12671

macrumors 6502
Dec 29, 2013
350
0
Southern US
You can see the Apple philosophy at work here. Microsoft has the attitude that "the user is in control". Unfortunately we get a cruder UI and operating system, and we have to be more knowledgable about how to fix things than we might wish.

The Apple philosophy is "the computer is smart enough". They try everything they can to have the machine figure it out. Here's an example, they have some decisions to make whether to put the computer to sleep or not. Maybe you have some chatty BT, or network, so you don't really want to go to sleep. The problem with this is that the computer can't know what you're really thinking.

There's not to many at this point, but OS X really could stand an improvement in some areas, such as this one. When I actually go to the Apple menu and say sleep, I mean sleep dammit! If you're still doing network business and I interrupt that, it's my fault.
I understand your point, and it's valid....but what if the OS or some other program is running background tasks, and you don't realize it? I think there are some instances where the OS should be able to override user input to preserve the integrity of the system as best as possible....
 

Cubemmal

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 13, 2013
824
1
I understand your point, and it's valid....but what if the OS or some other program is running background tasks, and you don't realize it? I think there are some instances where the OS should be able to override user input to preserve the integrity of the system as best as possible....
I don't agree with that philosophy. Note I'm also a software engineer who makes these kinds of decisions every day. Made one yesterday in fact - I had to decide whether to make a bit of big-banging code try to work if the program was ever ported from 32 bit to 64 bit. "Self healing code" - if it works. Since I can't test it in 64 bit I don't know if it will work (it's decoding an OS error bit integer error message).

On this one, who knows more, the computer, or the user? Why not extend that to deleting files while we're at it. Since OS X has built in revision control, why not decide NOT to delete that file the user asked you to, just keep all the prior revisions because he may want them later? Oops, you really wanted to erase it to destroy the paper trail?

Apple thinks they know more than they do.
 

Cubemmal

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 13, 2013
824
1
The nMP is still having the sleep problem. I'm submitting various reports to Apple engineering. This is frustrating.