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Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by robotrenegade, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. robotrenegade macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville,SC
    #1
    I saw this the other day and I wanted to know if i'm hacked.

    *Notice the names "Wheel" and "staff". Is this normal? If not how do I take care of the files?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Darwin macrumors 65816

    Darwin

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    round the corner
    #2
    Looks normal to me, wheel I hardy see but I do know that Staff is a group of users for the system.

    Which files are you wanting to work on?
     
  3. robotrenegade thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville,SC
    #3
    What is "wheel"? I have access to any file but I wanted to know how Wheel got there.
     
  4. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #4
    wheel would be some sort of built in user.

    dont worry about it - if you change any of these settings you are likely to muck up access to your folders/system etc, i did this once and the only fix (at the time to my knowledge) was to reinstall the system!
     
  5. Darwin macrumors 65816

    Darwin

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    round the corner
  6. robotrenegade thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville,SC
    #6
  7. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Singapore
    #7
    like i said, stop worrying.

    there are 100+ user accounts that are already created when OSX installs - these all run in the background.

    you have nothing to worry about.
     
  8. Guiyon macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Location:
    North Shore, MA
    #8
    Those permissions looks fine. 'wheel' is one of the older groups present in the *nix systems (by default, 'root' belongs to the 'wheel' group). It was originally used for specifying which users could 'su' to 'root'. On Mac OS X systems, most of the POSIX directories (/usr,/bin,/sbin,...) are typically owned by root:wheel and most of Apple's directories are owned by root:staff or root:admin. One thing to remember on most modern systems you are not the only user on the system; the only human user, maybe, but most of the system services run under alternate users/groups for security purposes.
     
  9. robotrenegade thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville,SC

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