No Air Print~

Discussion in 'iPad Tips, Help and Troubleshooting' started by Yankeegirl, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. Yankeegirl macrumors member

    Yankeegirl

    Joined:
    May 18, 2015
    #1
    Has anyone experienced air printing that worked previously to suddenly stop working?
    My Mac can recognize and print but none of my i devices will recognize or print!
    I'm tweeting with @AppleSupport but to no avail. This did not happen with today's iOS update.
    I have since updated but still won't see my HP printer.
    I'd appreciate any advice.
    I've tried troubleshooting through Google. Tried it all. Nothing has worked!
     
  2. Axle209 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2015
    #2
    I have the same problem, hope someone can answered this question. Since the new update my iPads (iPad2 and Mimi) will not print or find a AirPrint printers on their print function, states no AirPrint Printers found. I still can print from a MacBook Pro without a problem. Very frustrating, I hope someone has found a fix for this issue.
    Thank You
    Here are a list of my printers:

    Canon IP 4700
    Canon MG 6600
    Canon MG 6600 (has the air print software). (Same printer)
    HP Officejet 6700




     
  3. Pndrgnsvc macrumors 6502

    Pndrgnsvc

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    Location:
    Georgetown, Texas
    #3
    When I have had a problem of this nature, it's because my iPhone was connected to the "wrong" wifi network.

    For reasons undetermined, my iPhone will sometimes auto connect/login to my "other" wifi network. (not AirPrint enabled). So for me, the fix is just a matter of reselecting the proper wifi signal.

    Anyway, it's worth checking...
     
  4. TrueBlou macrumors demi-god

    TrueBlou

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    #4
    I have the Canon MG5650 and had this issue the other day, rather randomly as it's worked perfect for the best part of a year.

    For me all I had to do war hard reboot my iPad (power and home button until you see the Apple logo) and it was back to normal once it restarted.

    Reboot the printer and the router as well at this point, won't necessarily be the problem but there's no harm in ruling it out.

    Other than that as previously suggested, check that you're on the same WiFi network as the printer. This will vary of course, my router doesn't care what network I'm on, it will still route the connection to the printer.

    Also AirPrint won't work on a public network, which granted many people won't be using in their home but I've encountered quite a few people who's network hasn't been set up as private so it's probably worth mentioning.
     
  5. ericwn macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2016
    #5
    And what is a hard reboot going to achieve for AirPrint? That sounds like a restart would have sufficed.
     
  6. TrueBlou macrumors demi-god

    TrueBlou

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    #6
    It possibly would, but if you're going to do it in a situation where you're having an issue, you might as well do it in a way that clears out all of the rubbish that could possibly be a contributing factor.

    It's worth remembering that a simple restart restores everything to the way it was before you switched off. Including temporary files, anything in memory and so on.

    Whereas a hard reset will force iOS to clear out all the temporary files and anything else that was in memory and reboot to a fully clean state.

    If you're troubleshooting anything the best position to start from is a clean state, thus, hard reset. It does no damage, doesn't affect any saved settings or information but gives you a nice clean slate to start from.
     
  7. ericwn macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2016
    #7
    Can you provide a resource for this theory that the forced restart clears out something that the regular does not? I cannot find it on Apples website and it sure sounds anecdotal.
    I don't believe temp files will be present after a restart of any sorts.
     
  8. TrueBlou macrumors demi-god

    TrueBlou

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    #8
    It's not a theory by any means. You're welcome to do a simple search on the subject, where you'll find all you need to know including why it's sometimes a bad idea and why it's sometimes a good idea, particularly for isolating problems.

    Beyond that you can hook up to Xcode and monitor many aspects of the system as a whole, you'd be surprised (unless of course you're also a developer) at just how much crap runs in the background of the system, much of which is best cleared out if you're trying to isolate a problem.

    You can hack further into the system if you like too, where you'll get access to every little detail of what's happening on your device and just how much discardable information can be floating around in memory. Not that I recommend that unless you know what your doing.
     
  9. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #9
    I had my parent's Canon drop off Airplay availability with no apparent cause recently. I redid their wifi network (upgraded them to a different router) and it just started working again. I'd do a factory reset on your router and see if that makes any difference.
     
  10. Richdmoore macrumors 65816

    Richdmoore

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Location:
    Troutdale, OR
    #10
    I have always had wifi connectivity issues with my Canon MG 7120 printer (connected Via wifi to an AirPort Extreme) with it dropping the wifi connection all the time. I finally gave up and connnected it via Ethernet to an extra airport express I had around via bridge mode, and all the issues stopped.

    The first thing I would do is turn off and back on the entire system (wifi router, printer, iPad) and see if it then works. Hopefully it is just one of those odd errors.

    At some point all the AirPrint printers will include a Bluetooth beacon to allow for better printing even if not on the same wifi network, I have no idea if any have been actually released yet.
    https://9to5mac.com/2016/06/16/ios-10-airprint-bluetooth-beacon-create-pdf-printing/
     
  11. ericwn macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2016
    #11
    Asking me to research your point ? Good one. :)
     
  12. TrueBlou macrumors demi-god

    TrueBlou

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    #12
    Hardly research, I could write up a couple of pages worth of waffle that even I couldn't be bothered to read through let alone type if I had the time, or you can get the same answers from a 2 second google search. Actually to hell with google, DuckDuckGo, but that's another debate altogether :D
     
  13. ericwn macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2016
    #13
    So you are in a forum and are unwilling to elaborate your point. Got it. Very helpful.
     
  14. TrueBlou macrumors demi-god

    TrueBlou

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    #14
    Fine, you want long winded rambling, you can have it. In return I’d like you to do the same and explain your point or lack thereof in detail as so far you’ve given no actual evidence or information to support your case beyond being agitative and irritating.

    Hard resetting an iOS device is an often misunderstood feature, many believe that the simple process of hard resetting an iOS device helps with the smooth running of the device, which is of course complete and total nonsense. In fact the opposite of that can be the case, it can however be useful in the fault finding process.

    Consider a hard reset to be like pulling the plug out of your computer, every process that is running or held in memory at that point is instantly killed.

    So first, lets get the why that can sometimes be a bad idea out of the way.

    Simply put there are myriad processes (which you can think of as programs if you like) which are always running, invisibly to the user, in the background of your device. Here’s a little screen I’ve just taken from Xcode to show just how many of these little (and not so little) tasks can be running at any given time and this is not the full list, just a sampling of what’s happening and of course there are also some actual apps in there too.

    Processes.jpg


    These “programs” read and write data to and from the RAM and to the permanent storage as well as between each other in order to keep all of the functions, processes and apps on your device functioning normally. When you perform a hard reset all of these processes are abruptly interrupted before they can finish whatever task they were in the middle of performing.

    While some of these processes may sometimes seem small and insignificant they all have their part to play and if just one of them becomes corrupted it can cause problems with your device, potentially (though unlikely) even rendering it non-functioning and requiring a complete re-installation of iOS.

    Which is why under normal circumstances you should only power cycle your iOS devices by holding the power button and selecting the “slide to power off” option. This gives the operating system time to finish up all of it’s little processes and write any information it needs from RAM into the devices storage, this is then recalled when your device starts up again and your device by and large returns to a state nigh on identical to that which it was pre-shutdown.


    So, that’s the bad and if it’s really that big and scary why do we even have the option to hard reset a device.

    Well, primarily the hard reset is included in order to provide a way to get a non-functioning, or “frozen”, device to power off and start up again. But there is a secondary use to the hard reset which is the other reason it’s there and that is that it can be a useful tool in the troubleshooting process, one that is used by Apple support themselves when diagnosing a problem.

    In what seems like an odd twist of the why you shouldn’t hard reset, the reason you do as part of troubleshooting is precisely the opposite of the safe shutdown process. Thankfully iOS is a pretty robust system, that hard reset option is there and easily accessible because the actual probability of damage as a result of using it is pretty minuscule. Not impossible, just very, very unlikely.

    By interrupting the running processes during their execution you are preventing them from writing any of the information currently held in RAM into the permanent storage of the device, they don’t get to finish up any of their tasks and they don’t get to tell the system to return them to the exact same state again when it starts up. This means that when the device starts up again it is doing so to a cleaner state. It is in essence restarting almost everything afresh. Therefore some processes which may have been running and would be restored to that running state during a normal power cycle, are not even started when using the hard reset option.

    So if for example there was an app or process causing a memory leak, which would ultimately lead to the system slowing down and becoming unresponsive, a normal power cycle will also restore that rouge element to it’s previous condition. Whereas performing a hard reset bypasses the point where the system would tell the process to restore to it’s previous condition.

    That’s why you’ll often see it suggested when people are experiencing issues in, for example Safari, when it’s become unresponsive or apparently won’t connect to or load web pages. I’ve encountered it myself on rare occasions and including the extended group of people who’s systems I maintain when they need it, I have seen it dozens of times. You get a phone call because their iPad is broken and they can’t get onto the internet, they’ve tried closing Safari from the task switcher, they’ve tried switching it off and back on again, they’ve tried switching their router off and on but nothing is working it’s just broken, panic ahhhhhhhh. So you tell them to do a hard reset and as if by magic everything works again when it starts back up.

    Or when their device won’t connect to WiFi, even though they’ve done everything it tells them to on the Apple website, but it still isn’t connecting. Is it broken? Maybe it could be, one of the kids dropped it yesterday, they thought it was ok because it was working after that but now it’s not. So, you tell them to do a hard reset before resorting to any more destructive means like resetting network settings. In the majority of cases that one simple task of doing a hard reset will have fixed the problem.

    Which is why when you’re going into any diagnostic situation it’s best to start from as clean a state as possible. It doesn’t matter if it’s an iPad an iPhone a media streamer a printer or a Bugatti. You get rid of as many of the rouge elements which can cause issues but aren’t necessarily going to be related to what you’re looking for. As for why in an AirPrint problem, the same reason as you'd reboot the router and printer, to get to the cleanest state possible. I’ve spent decades testing/diagnosing and fixing a wide variety of things from consumer electronics to semiconductor equipment. The last thing I would want to do when looking for the cause of an issue is have the system flooded with potential dead ends. You get that crap out of the way first, makes your life a lot easier.
     
  15. ericwn macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2016
    #15
    I find it interesting to say the least that this step is nowhere to be found in systematic troubleshooting advice anywhere in Apples documentation. If it were such an essential and harmless step. Thank you though for your thoughts on the matter, I get your thinking.
     
  16. TrueBlou macrumors demi-god

    TrueBlou

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    #16

    Indeed it's not generally mentioned officially, I suppose Apple would prefer you not have to resort to using it. There is after all a risk, no matter how minuscule and that's something that will tend to keep a process out of normal troubleshooting pages, which if we're honest are usually a bit crap and basic at the best of times.
    But it's something you'll encounter from them if, for example, you do a chat with tech support. Depending on the issue you're facing of course.

    It's something that can get used more often when developing apps though, it's all too easy to do something that ends up causing a system problem (or at least I do :D) and usually it's just a damn sight easier to hard reset and flush the system out to get it back to responding properly before continuing debugging.
     

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