No Internet even though wireless is "connected"

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by maxwelbr, Jul 13, 2007.

  1. maxwelbr macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    #1
    Hi,
    I am brand spanking new to the Mac world - just bought a MacBook a few weeks ago. It has been working great (despite me still feeling a lot lost on my of the short cuts). This morning, it picked up a wireless signal without any problems at all and I could connect to the internet and check email, etc.. However, a few hours later and I am an in another location it is says that it is picking up the wireless network, but NOTHING happens when I try to connect to the internet (I'm using a friend PC in the same office to post this). I have tried all kinds of tricks including restarting, trying all the IP addresses available and nothing I do seems to make it work.
    Does anyone have any suggestions?

    thanks in advance!
     
  2. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #2
    Power cycle the wireless routers and all other routers in the path to whatever has the initial internet connection. I can have a perfectly fine wireless connection all over my house but if my gateway router or DSL modem is on the fritz you don't get out of the house's internal network. I doubt that the initial connection is flawed since the PC is working fine. Somewhere it has a slightly different path than the wireless router, or just the wireless is messed up. Either way I'd start by cycling power on the routers and see if that helps.
     
  3. wrldwzrd89 macrumors G5

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #3
    Can other computers access the internet through the particular access point you're using? If not, the access point probably needs to be reset. This is easy to do - all that's needed is physical access to it and its power cord. Pull the power cord out, plug it back in, wait for it to start up, and try again. If that fails, check further upstream. For example, a cable connecting the access point to the rest of the network may be disconnected.

    If all that fails, the issue is either with your computer or with your computer's connection to the access point. To resolve connectivity issues try moving the computer closer to the access point and making sure nothing is interfering with your connection (for example, other wireless devices operating on the same frequency). Finally, if you've determined that it's your computer, try turning AirPort power off then back on to force it to reestablish a connection. Also, take a look at Network Diagnostics - this is an invalualble tool for fixing networking problems on Mac OS X. It can be invoked by going into System Preferences, clicking Network, then clicking Network Diagnostics.
     

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