No one expeting/eager about new rMBP anymore?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by NickPhamUK, Sep 22, 2014.

  1. NickPhamUK macrumors 6502

    NickPhamUK

    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    #1
    I remember in 2011 people keep asking when the new gen is coming, what to expect, should they buy the current version or wait, bla bla. When there were sandy bridge around people were eager about ivy bridge. When ivy bridge was available people start talking about haswell.

    But it's been a year and I don't see discussion about broadwell that often. People lose interest about it bcoz the current version is so good or just that Intel is extremely slow in releasing new stuff?
     
  2. Lachhh macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2014
    Location:
    Mainland Europe
    #2
    Could be anything. Not sure if the amount of threads on a subject are too reliable a gauge, I've seen quite a bit of buzz around Broadwell.

    I wouldn't be surprised if upgrades in general weren't as important to most people nowadays as they were three and more years back, when a component upgrade might have meant enabling them to do things they could not do before, or enabling something crucial to run notably faster. Today's machines are generally fast and powerful enough to cater to the vast majority of computer user's needs, that may be why more people nowadays shrug at the thought of an upgrade.
    I personally fall into that group. Between 2005 and 2011 I upgraded my laptops every year in what seemed like the eternal hunt for a laptop that could fulfil my needs as fast as I'd like it to. This hasn't been an issue for me in years now, so I personally have lost interest what concerns various spec and speed bumps and keep machines far longer than I used to. (Replaced my 3 year old machine only a few months ago, and only because I hated the noise it emitted, not because it wasn't fast enough for my needs.)

    I don't give a toss about raw power upgrades, because everything from this point onwards is overkill for my personal usage scenario anyway. I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one who reasons this way.
     
  3. dbdynsty25 macrumors regular

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    Nov 9, 2008
    Location:
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    #3
    Lachhh is right. At least in my scenario.

    With regular PC laptops over the years, I was constantly upgrading. Getting the latest and greatest usually was a significant bump. But since 2008 when I switched to MacBooks for my laptop needs (I still build my own gaming PCs)...I have only had 3 machines. That's unheard of for me. It's never really a speed upgrade, it's always for something physically better. 2008 Aluminum MacBook > 13" MacBook Air (2011) > 13" rMBP.
     
  4. poematik13 macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 5, 2014
    #4
    2015 hopefully will bring us new MBP's with DDR4 and 32GB ram capability, broadwell/skylake (hopefully a 6-core high end option) and hopefully 9 series nvidia graphics.
     
  5. paolo- macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    #5
    Well, the retina has only been out for 2 years so I wouldn't expect a radical redesign. It's fairly obvious the new laptops will come with Broadwell. Also, as others have mentioned the current laptops have enough power for the needs of most. To add to that, I'd mention that the speed increase between the 2012 rMBP and the current rMBP isn't that big. Ivy Bridge to Haswell wasn't that big of a jump. Broadwell representing a die shrink will probably bring more significant performance gains. I'd expect those to drop early 2015.

    I guess you could add that Apple hasn't be extremely innovative as of late...
     
  6. poiihy macrumors 68020

    poiihy

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    Aug 22, 2014
    #6
    Apple jumped forward a notch with the new MBPs. Now the software needs to catch up to make it relatively weak again.
     
  7. Joelist macrumors member

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    Jan 28, 2014
    Location:
    Illinois
    #7
    Actually the speed jump from 2012 to now IS big. It's not just Haswell - the PCIe SSDs have over double the I/O speed of their predecessors and Iris Pro is in a completely different class of performance than the iGPUs around in 2012.

    If I had to guess, we'll see something of a chassis redesign to go along with Broadwell. We may also see another change in display technology or possibly new audio technology. Apple knows that with the extremely high performance of the late 2013 rMBPs (even now they are VERY close to being the most powerful notebooks out there) they will need to differentiate more to get current Mac users to jump in.
     
  8. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    Jul 29, 2012
    Location:
    Rialto, CA
    #8
    Other than iGPU performance, I still wouldn't call Haswell any decent jump over Ivy, or even Sandy for that matter. Intel really isn't making any significant gains, at all. Wish AMD would get it's act together and give Intel a good beating for once.

    I came from a fully loaded cMBP with a 480GB SSD, 16 GB RAM, 2.3 i7, 512mb 650M to the same model you have, and there was little if any difference in performance at all. 400-500 Mb/s to 600-700 Mb/s Read/Write isn't noticeable. If I was rocking the 1TB option with 1GB/s R/W then maybe.
     
  9. gochi macrumors 6502

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    Mar 31, 2011
  10. SCOLANATOR macrumors 6502a

    SCOLANATOR

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    Jul 3, 2013
    Location:
    UK
    #10
    It's because Intel switched their focus from increasing processing power year on year to maintaining a set level of processing power while drastically reducing energy consumption. Is Haswell faster than Sandy? Yes, definitely, especially with all the new instructions. Is Haswell considerably faster than Sandy? No.
    Is Haswell massively more energy efficient than Sandy? Yes. I feel this was a good move by Intel and I feel after Broadwell when Skylake launches we will see a bit more of a focus back on performance.

    I agree with you and would also like to see AMD smack Intel about again like back in the good old days but its just not happening. Intel spends more on R&D than AMD generates in revenue. Superior architectures + superior fabs.

    Don't underestimate the PCI-e SSD, it's not just considerably faster, 35% - 100% depending on the capacity, but it also lays the groundwork for each new rMBP to incorporate the latest controllers and NAND cells without any penalty performance. You're also forgetting about the huge boost to iGPU performance,

    Personally I cannot wait for the new Broadwell rMBP. If they include a GT 950M in the top version then I'll buy it on day one and just sell this one, as I do quite a bit of gaming on it. So some of us are very excited, we just haven't seen any news/rumours to talk much about it, what our expectations are have been discussed to death.

    Potential for IGZO IPS display, faster SSD, more energy efficient CPU, 50% boost to dGPU, further refinements to battery chemistry and circuitry, USB Type-C 3.1? Full HD Facetime Camera. Yeh I can't wait.
     
  11. ABC5S macrumors 68040

    ABC5S

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    Florida

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