Norton Internet Security Firewall

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by crtvmac, Feb 16, 2010.

  1. crtvmac Guest

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    Aug 14, 2009
    #1
    I just bought Norton Internet Security suite. It has an auto unlock feature designed into the firewall. Does anyone beside me think this is an awkwardly hazardous  feature in they're firewall design that needs to be reevaluate? If a hacker broke into your system and got access to your Norton firewall configurations, you would not know it because the firewall auto unlocks every time you turn on your computer. When you finally did realize your Norton firewall had been breeched, it would possibly be to late because your person files would have been compromised. With that said, would someone elaborate, or offer a firewall recommendation for Mac? I was thinking about purchasing Intego Firewall X6.
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #3
    I used the NIS Suite for years on Windows, but finally gave it up in favor of other tools, because it was such a resource hog. There's exactly zero need for it on a Mac, since the Mac OS X built-in firewall does just fine and there are zero viruses that run on Mac OS X, so there's no need for the AntiVirus tool.
     
  4. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    Jul 11, 2003
    #4
    I wouldn't install that on my Mac. It's unnecessary and a resource hog. Do a forum search. There is no lack of Norton threads.
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #5
    If its a Norton/Symantic product - avoid it like the plague. Those programs seem to cause problems then what they're purportedly trying to fix/protect.

    OSX has a built-in firewall actually two. The one with the GUI front-end that they produced and ispfw which is included and can be accessed via the terminal. Both of which I believe offer a better solution that norton
     
  6. crtvmac thread starter Guest

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    Aug 14, 2009
    #6
    Maybe I did not express myself for full comprehension. When I said, "files compromised", I meant your personal files that you did not want strangers to view, not virus infected. Thanks for the input, just the same.

    Thanks for the information.

    I've decided to learn how to configure the build in firewall included with my Mac OS, based on the input I have gotten form this thread. Thanks for the input.
     
  7. Hmac macrumors 68020

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    May 30, 2007
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    Midwest USA
    #7
    I agree that Norton is bad news.

    As stated, you have two active firewalls if you're using Leopard or Snow Leopard, although one of them may have been turned off by default when you installed Snow Leopard, if you did. You can check that by going to Preferences -> Security -> Firewall.

    Also note that virtually all routers provide hardware firewall protection.

    If you want to test your vulnerability, check Shields Up! It will do a VERY thorough analysis. I know from past experience that Norton products add virtually nothing that Macs dont' already have built in.
     
  8. crtvmac thread starter Guest

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    #8
    Thanks for the information.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #9
    I know you weren't referring to virus-infected files. I only mention it because Norton AntiVirus is part of the NIS Suite, so both the firewall and the AV components are unnecessary on Mac OS X.
     
  10. kasakka macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #10
    Norton's software is generally as bad as malware. Until some time ago it was actually a huge pain in the ass to even remove it from the system. The only reason they're still in business is that they're selling in stores and there are lots of less computer-savvy folks around.
     
  11. crtvmac thread starter Guest

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    Aug 14, 2009
    #11
    I know what you talking about concerning malware. You wouldn't want your file's information leaving your computer without your consent, some nefarious person taking control of your computer, or someone with a keylogger looking to illegally get rich at your expense by circumventing physically going to a bank. It would be in your best interest to safeguard against malware with some form of security software by some reputable software manufacture of your choice.
     
  12. TSX macrumors 68030

    TSX

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    #12
    How many of you keep your firewall turned off on your mac?
     
  13. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    #13
    should i remove norton

    Way before I found this website and taking the advice of an apple service rep, I actually bought Norton Internet Security for my 2006 imac. Today, I finally upgraded my ram and installed Snow Leopard on what will soon be my "backup" imac. Should I remove Norton from this old computer or is the damage done and just live with it hogging up ram and being unnecessary?
     
  14. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #14
    Mine is generally off as it interferes with the software I use to interact with my companies network/servers.

    I may play with it a little further and see if I can tune it so that it doesn't block the software I use.
     
  15. crtvmac thread starter Guest

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    Aug 14, 2009
    #15
    If you plan on using the firewall thats incorporated within Snow Leopard, I personally would remove the Norton firewall application. It will free up space on your harddrive. You should only run one firewall application on your computer at any time. No, the damage is not done. You can remove the Norton firewall or all other applications bundle within the Norton Internet Security Suite. To preform removal of Norton applications, open your application folder. Then open the Symantec Solutions folder. In the Symantec Solutions folder you will find the Symantec uninstall.app; run that application. The rest of the uninstall procedure should be easy to follow within the uninstall window. Your upgraded ram will not be hogged up/affected by your Norton Internet Security applications or any other applications, unless you run those applications.
     
  16. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    Feb 9, 2010
    #16
    This sounds like my best bet. I took care of this in about thirty seconds. Should have found this site years ago..... Thanks for the advice.
     

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