Resolved Not a programmer, need some help for my friend

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by KUguardgrl13, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. KUguardgrl13, Dec 6, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013

    KUguardgrl13 macrumors 68020

    KUguardgrl13

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    #1
    My friend is applying for programming jobs (recent comp sci grad), and one he's applying to is for OS X (or could be iOS; all he said was "Apple"). He's asked to borrow my MBP since he doesn't have one.

    The machine in question is a mid-2009 13" MBP 2.26ghz with 8gb RAM, a newer 500gb HDD, and running 10.6.8. It's currently not in use because the SATA cable is fried. I'll be taking it in Saturday to the Apple store to get it working again or ordering the cable on Amazon and doing myself. I have a late-2013 rMBP but I need it for my school work.

    I was just wondering if my old MBP will suffice for two weeks to help my friend get this job and what will need to be on it for him to program. I'm not a developer and have none of those tools installed. Also, is Snow Leopard sufficient?

    Thanks for your help! Any suggestions you can pass on to a fellow programmer would be helpful, I'm sure. He mostly works in Linux and Windows, I believe.
     
  2. Blakeasd macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    #2
    I have the same computer (though not in use right now). I was able to do all of the programming I wanted with it. It might be best to update it to Mavericks so you can install the latest version of Xcode (v5.x) on it. Also, he may want to try using some of the newer OS X API's only found in Mavericks. Xcode is the application you might want to consider downloading from the Mac App Store. Xcode is Apple's Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for use with OS X and iOS.

    Good Luck!
     
  3. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #3
    I'd figure out what languages and APIs he's expected to use for the job. We use only Macs at my workplace, but our programs are written entirely in C, C++, Python, Java, and several web technologies (JavaScript, HTML, CSS, Handlebars, SCSS, jQuery, CoffeeScript, Backbone... I'm sure there's some more that I'm forgetting right now.)

    I suppose no matter what you'll want to start off by installing Mavericks and Xcode (both free on the Mac App Store.) Then you'll want to launch Xcode and install the Command Line Tools (it's in Xcode > Preferences > Downloads.) After that... if you want to be prepared for anything I'd also get a Java IDE... Eclipse if you want free or IntelliJ if you're willing to pay. The unlimited trial version of Sublime always comes in handy, too.

    Customizing your terminal with a useful prompt and colors is also neat... might make you look a bit more into computers or something which couldn't possibly hurt.
     
  4. KUguardgrl13 thread starter macrumors 68020

    KUguardgrl13

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    #4
    Thanks for the advice! The Genius also thought that it should be running Mavericks (apparently you can no longer download Xcode for 10.6 or 10.7), so I'm downloading it now. I run it on my new rMBP, but I was worried with it being such a new OS and the machine being an older one.
     
  5. chown33, Dec 7, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013

    chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #5
    The part in bold is demonstrably false.

    Anyone with a free Apple Developer account can download any older version of Xcode as far back as Xcode 2.3.

    First, go register here (link is the word "Register" or the phrase "register for free"):
    https://developer.apple.com/devcenter/mac/

    It's simple, and there are no qualifications or fees involved.

    Then, sign in using the new account, and scroll down to Additional Downloads on the Mac Dev Center page. Click the "view all downloads" link.

    An extensive list of downloads should appear. At the left, enter xcode into the box that has a magnifying glass and rounded corners (the "search" box). Then press the return key on your keyboard.

    At this point you should see a list of every available download that has the keyword "xcode" in its description or title. On the 1st page alone (1 of 5), I see Xcode 4.6.3, 4.6.2, and 4.6, as well as Xcode 5.

    On page 3 (of 5) I see Xcode 4.1 for Lion. If I go all the way to page 5 (of 5) I see Xcode 2.3, whose Read Me PDF tells me it runs on 10.4 Tiger.

    So do a little looking at older Xcode versions, find the latest one that runs on the OS version you have, and download it from the Mac Dev Center.

    Granted, there is no longer any Apple support for these older Xcode versions, but if one has an older tutorial or book to work from, the older versions can still be obtained and used.
     
  6. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #6
    In my experience, Mavericks performs better than either Lion or Mountain Lion did on my 6 year old Macs (one of them actually didn't even qualify for Mountain Lion - I upgraded it straight from Lion to Mavericks.) I can't remember how Snow Leopard performed it's been so long since it was installed.
     
  7. KUguardgrl13 thread starter macrumors 68020

    KUguardgrl13

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    #7
    It seems to be running fine. My friend was able to write a few simple lines of C++ for practice last night.

    Thank you all for your help! Nice to know that you can venture to other areas of MR and get assistance when needed :)
     

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