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Apr 12, 2001
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A vulnerability in WiFi chips made by Cypress Semiconductor and Broadcom left billions of devices susceptible to an attack that allowed nearby attackers to decrypt sensitive data sent over the air.

ipad-iphone-duo-ios-12.jpg

The security flaw was detailed at the RSA security conference today (via Ars Technica), and for Apple users, the issue was addressed in the iOS 13.2 and macOS 10.15.1 updates that were released back in late October.

Dubbed Kr00k, the WiFi chip flaw caused vulnerable devices to use an all-zero encryption key to encrypt part of a user's communications. When applied successfully, the attack let hackers decrypt some wireless network packets sent by a vulnerable device. As described by Ars Technica:
Kr00k exploits a weakness that occurs when wireless devices disassociate from a wireless access point. If either the end-user device or the access point is vulnerable, it will put any unsent data frames into a transmit buffer and then send them over the air. Rather than encrypt this data with the session key negotiated earlier and used during the normal connection, vulnerable devices use a key consisting of all zeros, a move that makes decryption trivial.
Chips from Broadcom and Cypress are used in many modern WiFi devices like smartphones, laptops, Internet of Things products, WiFi access points, and routers.
Our tests confirmed that prior to patching, some client devices by Amazon (Echo, Kindle), Apple (iPhone, iPad, MacBook), Google (Nexus), Samsung (Galaxy), Raspberry (Pi 3), Xiaomi (RedMi), as well as some access points by Asus and Huawei, were vulnerable to KrØØk. This totaled to over a billion Wi-Fi-capable devices and access points, at a conservative estimate. Further, many other vendors whose products we did not test also use the affected chipsets in their devices.
According to ESET Research, which published details on the vulnerability, it was disclosed to Broadcom and Cypress along with potentially affected parties. At this time, patches for devices from most major manufacturers have been released.

ESET Research recommends making sure all of the latest updates have been applied to WiFi capable devices to patch the vulnerability.

Article Link: Now-Fixed WiFi Vulnerability Left Apple Devices Open to Attack
 

nutmac

macrumors 603
Mar 30, 2004
5,294
4,819
I hope to see HomeKit-enabled router expand to non-HomeKit devices.

While advanced users can use VLAN and other features to isolate non-secure devices from the network, to average consumers, all of this is a mumbo jumbo.

Aside from few computing devices, such as computers, phones, printers, and network storage, which are typically patched more frequently (although some definitely not often enough and require manual intervention which means most folks won't do it), most devices should be isolated from other devices on the network.
 

BootsWalking

macrumors 65816
Feb 1, 2014
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When you read about billions of devices being vulnerable it's hard to ever feel that our data or communications are safe (and lots of different brands/models are affected by this bug, not just Apple).
 
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Dave-Z

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
858
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Of course Apple recognizes that iOS 13 is a mess so they're also going to release a patch for users who, despite having an iOS 13-supported device, have opted to stick with iOS 12

Oh... wait... :rolleyes:
 

cmaier

Suspended
Jul 25, 2007
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Of course Apple recognizes that iOS 13 is a mess so they're also going to release a patch for users who, despite having an iOS 13-supported device, have opted to stick with iOS 12

Oh... wait... :rolleyes:

Other than mail, iOS 13 has gotten reasonably stable. By WWDC they should have it rock solid :)
 
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Dave-Z

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
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Other than mail, iOS 13 has gotten reasonably stable. By WWDC they should have it rock solid :)

Maybe for you. I have some specific apps that are pretty much entirely broken because of how Apple changed the VoIP system, as well as notifications. These are legitimate apps from honest developers that are effectively broken because Apple decided to punish the entire community for Facebook's misdeeds.

I also experience several, very annoying bugs. Smart invert colors doesn't work properly since Apple introduced Dark Mode. Sure dark mode is more deliberate and looks nicer when supported. But the problem is that many web sites and apps do not support it. For my use case, I find smart invert colors to be a better solution because it simply works more consistently across apps and web sites... Except that in iOS 13 it doesn't. Sometimes it inverts white backgrounds to black, other times not (same web site, same Safari, just seemingly random times).

Mail (as you mentioned) is horrible. It doesn't work refresh or update mail lists, badges, or provide proper notifications.

Reminders doesn't clear badge notifications properly and with a non-iCloud CalDAV account does not even update in the background despite being set to fetch every 15 minutes.

I'm sure I could go on, but you get the idea. I don't like iOS 13 and coming from iOS 12 (which was so rock solid) the experience is a nightmare.
 
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allpar

macrumors 6502
May 20, 2002
338
91
Not to stop everyone from getting into IOS good or bad, but do we have a definitive answer for Mojave? I can't move forward at this time...

- the other Dave Z
 
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metalsiren

macrumors 6502a
Oct 28, 2017
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this is why you keep your devices updated because of security risks - most people forget that
 

Dave-Z

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
858
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No we were assured that “what happens on the iPhone stays in the iPhone” and “it just works”.

I would just like to point out that neither of those have turned out to be true:


 

I7guy

macrumors Penryn
Nov 30, 2013
27,393
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Gotta be in it to win it
I would just like to point out that neither of those have turned out to be true:


The first is a red-herring. A contractor working for Apple is subject to the same non-disclosure as an employee. While there are some who know the exact terms, most contractors have to treat their work as confidential.

The second is a YMMV and doesn’t really invalidate it just works. Mail “just works” for me.
 
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Appleman3546

macrumors 6502
May 13, 2019
331
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It is a good thing that control center turns off WiFi and does not turn on someone’s WiFi the next day automatically
 

Dave-Z

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
858
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The first is a red-herring. A contractor working for Apple is subject to the same non-disclosure as an employee. While there are some who know the exact terms, most contractors have to treat their work as confidential.

The second is a YMMV and doesn’t really invalidate it just works. Mail “just works” for me.

I disagree.
 

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,871
15,006
In between a rock and a hard place
They are as secure as anything else. This problem was caused by the chip providers (who provide the same chips to everyone else).

This is why Apple needs to continue along the path of making as many of the chips it uses itself.
They are as secure as anything else. But Apple designs some of their chips, they don't make them. Contractors do. So the vulnerabilities can still be introduced into the supply chain through the same vector; chip providers... just like the vulnerabilities can be introduced by Apple themselves... or the chip makers suppliers... or...

Most of this stuff is scarier in theory than in practice.
 

realtuner

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Mar 8, 2019
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They are as secure as anything else. But Apple designs some of their chips, they don't make them. Contractors do. So the vulnerabilities can still be introduced into the supply chain through the same vector; chip providers... just like the vulnerabilities can be introduced by Apple themselves... or the chip makers suppliers... or...

Most of this stuff is scarier in theory than in practice.
Ridiculous. So you think a fab could successfully modify an Apple chip design (with dozens of Apple engineers actually working at the fab making sure their designs are implemented correctly) without Apple knowing?

Or did you think Apple just faxes over the designs and says “here you go...make this for us”.
 
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