Ocd

Samtb

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Jan 6, 2013
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Why do so many people on this forum say to each other that they have "OCD"? Isn't this an insult to everyone, especially to people who really do suffer from OCD?
 

yg17

macrumors G5
Aug 1, 2004
14,911
2,480
St. Louis, MO
Why do so many people on this forum say to each other that they have "OCD"? Isn't this an insult to everyone, especially to people who really do suffer from OCD?
I agree. It ranks right up there with using "gay" or "retarded" to refer to things that you consider stupid or dumb.

Saying you have OCD because there's a microscopic scratch on your iPhone trivializes the problems people who suffer from OCD face every day.
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,753
142
I'm not insulted and therefore, that knocks out the idea that "every one" should feel insulted.
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
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Maybe it's worth pointing out the the colloquial or non-technical usage of OCD has nothing to do with OCD. In common usage, it usually means over attention to trivial flaws. That really has nothing to do with what OCD is, as a clinical syndrome.

Words like "gay", meaning dumb, and "retard", meaning stupid, are words I personally don't like. I'm not speaking for anyone else, but I find them unnecessarily offensive expressions. Another misused word is "paranoid", which, in common usage, has nothing to do with paranoia.

BTW: "Shrink" was originally, and possibly still is, a pejorative reference to psychologists and psychiatrists. I, for one, find it horribly offensive.:mad:
 
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the8thark

macrumors 68040
Apr 18, 2011
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Words like "gay", meaning dumb, and "retard", meaning stupid, are words I personally don't like. I'm not speaking for anyone else, but I find them unnecessarily offensive expressions.
Others might not find these terms offensive, but because you do, it's automatically wrong? Try to think of everyone here.

Maybe it's worth pointing out the the colloquial or non-technical usage of OCD has nothing to do with OCD. In common usage, it usually means over attention to trivial flaws. That really has nothing to do with what OCD is, as a clinical syndrome.
Just like the common usage of gay or retard might not refer to what those terms mean, just a colloquial use. And many people find being called OCD in this way offensive. Just because you do not, that does not make it right at all.

The original poster here has a very valid point. The OP finds being called OCD in that way offensive. And that is an insult. And I'm pretty sure the forum rules here prohibit users from insulting other users.
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
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Others might not find these terms offensive, but because you do, it's automatically wrong? Try to think of everyone here.

Just like the common usage of gay or retard might not refer to what those terms mean, just a colloquial use. And many people find being called OCD in this way offensive. Just because you do not, that does not make it right at all.

The original poster here has a very valid point. The OP finds being called OCD in that way offensive. And that is an insult. And I'm pretty sure the forum rules here prohibit users from insulting other users.
Please read my post again, as you have totally misinterpreted EVERYTHING I said.

You seem to have completely missed, and edited from the quotes, my statement..."are words I personally don't like. I'm not speaking for anyone else..."
 
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chrono1081

macrumors 604
Jan 26, 2008
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Why do so many people on this forum say to each other that they have "OCD"? Isn't this an insult to everyone, especially to people who really do suffer from OCD?
I've wondered this too. I used to have OCD (real OCD) and I would constantly switch light switches on and off, or make sure when I changed TV channels it always ended in pressing the "up" button, and I always had to shut doors and cabinets "correctly".

It was like I lived in a world where if I did one of these things wrong something terrible would happen. I overcame it mentally after a few years but still catch myself being "OCD" every now and then.

I kind of laugh when someone is like "I'm OCD because I need my sock drawer organized" oh if only they knew what real OCD was like.
 

Zmanbaseball2

macrumors 68040
Aug 24, 2012
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New York, USA
Ocd

I've wondered this too. I used to have OCD (real OCD) and I would constantly switch light switches on and off, or make sure when I changed TV channels it always ended in pressing the "up" button, and I always had to shut doors and cabinets "correctly".

It was like I lived in a world where if I did one of these things wrong something terrible would happen. I overcame it mentally after a few years but still catch myself being "OCD" every now and then.

I kind of laugh when someone is like "I'm OCD because I need my sock drawer organized" oh if only they knew what real OCD was like.
I feel you. I have OCD too. I am 15.

I have some of the same experiences as you. I constantly make sure my iPhone 5 is working by lock and unlocking and making sure the multitasking bar is clear 6-10 times before putting it away for school or before going to bed. I also make sure that my iPhone 5 or iPod touch 5 is charging before i go to bed by letting screen time out on its own, doing this 2-3 times. Its so annoying. I wish my OCD was keeping things clean and brushing my teeth more often!
I am not offended at all when someone refer to something as OCD. And i also kine to buy cases IDK if thats OCD. But whatever!


Sent from my iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2
 
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the8thark

macrumors 68040
Apr 18, 2011
3,993
837
Please read my post again, as you have totally misinterpreted EVERYTHING I said.

You seem to have completely missed, and edited from the quotes, my statement..."are words I personally don't like. I'm not speaking for anyone else..."
And that is my point. Just because someone means well, or says a harmless joke, or whatever, it might be taken a totally different way by someone else. So if someone takes offence to what we say, it's not a case of "I meant it in a nice way, therefore it is not offensive". We should be saying, "I did mean it in a nice way, but I am sorry if you are offended, I'll try not say it differently next time"

Many people say things in respect their personal attitude to certain words. And forget that others feel differently. We need to respect everyone's opinions on this matter and watch what we say.
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
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New England, USA
And that is my point. Just because someone means well, or says a harmless joke, or whatever, it might be taken a totally different way by someone else. So if someone takes offence to what we say, it's not a case of "I meant it in a nice way, therefore it is not offensive". We should be saying, "I did mean it in a nice way, but I am sorry if you are offended, I'll try not say it differently next time"

Many people say things in respect their personal attitude to certain words. And forget that others feel differently. We need to respect everyone's opinions on this matter and watch what we say.
Since you are not addressing my post, I'll just accept your instruction on how to conduct myself in the future. And i'll certainly try my best to respect everyone's personal opinions, and will absolutely watch what I say in the future.

I might point out that my post primarily addressed the issue of the clinical vs everyday usage of the terms mentioned, and my opinion (carefully labeled as such) of the everyday usage of those terms, which I personally find unnecessary and offensive.

(Please note: I emphasized that it was my personal opinion)
 

chrono1081

macrumors 604
Jan 26, 2008
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Isla Nublar
I feel you. I have OCD too. I am 15.

I have some of the same experiences as you. I constantly make sure my iPhone 5 is working by lock and unlocking and making sure the multitasking bar is clear 6-10 times before putting it away for school or before going to bed. I also make sure that my iPhone 5 or iPod touch 5 is charging before i go to bed by letting screen time out on its own, doing this 2-3 times. Its so annoying. I wish my OCD was keeping things clean and brushing my teeth more often!
I am not offended at all when someone refer to something as OCD. And i also kine to buy cases IDK if thats OCD. But whatever!


Sent from my iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2
Hopefully you'll end up like me and be able to overcome it. It took me years (maybe until I was 20 or so). Its soooo hard to do but if you can next time you start locking and unlocking your phone just stop. Put it down and walk away from it (I know its far easier said than done.) I started breaking my OCD when I was finally able to start doing this. Its horrible the first many times but eventually it gets easier and I found myself being less and less OCD.
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
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New England, USA
Hopefully you'll end up like me and be able to overcome it. It took me years (maybe until I was 20 or so). Its soooo hard to do but if you can next time you start locking and unlocking your phone just stop. Put it down and walk away from it (I know its far easier said than done.) I started breaking my OCD when I was finally able to start doing this. Its horrible the first many times but eventually it gets easier and I found myself being less and less OCD.
While I would never discourage any individual from working to overcome OCD on their own, I would suggest that there are some VERY effective techniques that can be taught in the proper situation that can help seped the process in a manner that can be less painful than doing things on one's own.

Again, I'm not pitching anything, and anything that works...works!:D
 

chrono1081

macrumors 604
Jan 26, 2008
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While I would never discourage any individual from working to overcome OCD on their own, I would suggest that there are some VERY effective techniques that can be taught in the proper situation that can help seped the process in a manner that can be less painful than doing things on one's own.

Again, I'm not pitching anything, and anything that works...works!:D
This.

I didn't want my parents to find out when I was a teenager because I knew they'd completely overreact so I never sought help.
 

Kissaragi

macrumors 68020
Nov 16, 2006
2,336
361
I had OCD when i was about 15 and have recovered from it. Its an awful condition but its certainly possible to beat or at least manage, the more help you can get the better.

Its pretty crazy for anyone to be offended by people using the word OCD in the context its used for here. Its a much more polite term to describe some of the people who are practically using scanning electron microscopes to look for imperfections on their new iPhones than they possibly deserve!
 

SMDBill

macrumors 6502
Apr 12, 2013
255
1
I've never been diagnosed but I have always secretly wondered. I do very odd things repetitively and often in multiples, or odd or even numbers of times. For example, I count every step I go up or down. I also count to verify each "flight" or change of direction in the stairs has the same number of stairs. If they do not, I go another level up or down, if possible, to verify at least the unevenness of the stairs remain the same floor to floor. If I take stairs and they end in an odd number of steps, I will sometimes take one step twice just to end on an even. It's silly and I know it is meaningless, but it drives me crazy to not do it so I just appease myself, as silly as it sounds.

I do several things that way. I find it very odd and I try to keep it to myself because it is embarrassing. If I tap my fingers I know how many times I did it, even if drumming to a beat. Music, fortunately, is usually in even numbers of beats so it is calming. But anyone who has ever listened to Rush (band) will know what I mean when I say some of their music drives me insane because they do not use standard time measures.

I don't get offended. Makes me feel like more of a club member when i hear others say it about themselves ;)
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
8,931
1,598
New England, USA
I've never been diagnosed but I have always secretly wondered. I do very odd things repetitively and often in multiples, or odd or even numbers of times. For example, I count every step I go up or down. I also count to verify each "flight" or change of direction in the stairs has the same number of stairs. If they do not, I go another level up or down, if possible, to verify at least the unevenness of the stairs remain the same floor to floor. If I take stairs and they end in an odd number of steps, I will sometimes take one step twice just to end on an even. It's silly and I know it is meaningless, but it drives me crazy to not do it so I just appease myself, as silly as it sounds.

I do several things that way. I find it very odd and I try to keep it to myself because it is embarrassing. If I tap my fingers I know how many times I did it, even if drumming to a beat. Music, fortunately, is usually in even numbers of beats so it is calming. But anyone who has ever listened to Rush (band) will know what I mean when I say some of their music drives me insane because they do not use standard time measures.

I don't get offended. Makes me feel like more of a club member when i hear others say it about themselves ;)
As long as it doesn't bother you, or interfere with the comfortable functioning of your life...the hell with it!:D

It's only when we do something that we do't want to do, and it bothers us, that it is worth getting some help for it.

The first question I would ask a patient is...what are you doing that you wish you weren't doing, or what are you unable to do that you wish you could.
 

SMDBill

macrumors 6502
Apr 12, 2013
255
1
As long as it doesn't bother you, or interfere with the comfortable functioning of your life...the hell with it!:D

It's only when we do something that we do't want to do, and it bothers us, that it is worth getting some help for it.

The first question I would ask a patient is...what are you doing that you wish you weren't doing, or what are you unable to do that you wish you could.
Good point and probably why I have never inquired. It doesn't inhibit anything and normally just aggravates me at worst. Nothing that lasts and usually only momentary interruptions. Nobody suspects unless I mention something like "we just climbed 58 stairs, with xxx on each flight" or something equally as trivial. And even then, most people brush it off as me being silly.
 

annk

Administrator
Staff member
Apr 18, 2004
13,613
4,471
Somewhere over the rainbow
*Puts on admin hat for a moment*

Just so no one needs to wonder: we consider the use of "gay" or "retarded" to be inappropriate language, and we moderate them (when we see them). This applies to all uses that aren't actually referring to gay issues (like in PRSI), or to issues surrounding mental retardation as such.

Some members use these terms innocently, not realizing that they're not really PC in civil conversion. We usually get a "Sorry, I didn't mean it like that, I won't use it in future" sort of response when we send a reminder. Some members use them knowingly, to rile others up.

"OCD" isn't seen to be as bad by as many people, but it's a good idea to keep in mind that it is a diagnosis, and it might well be offensive to some if you use it lightly. It's really all about respect. We might moderate it, depending on how it's used.

If someone makes a comment such as "you've got OCD" it can sometimes fall between the inappropriate and insults categories. It's inappropriate no matter what, but whether or not it's insulting according to our rules depends to a great extent on intent. "You're retarded" however is considered both inappropriate (because of the use of retarded) and insulting (should be pretty clear that the intent here is basically to insult).

Ok, carry on. Just thought I'd clear that up from a perspective of using certain words or terms in posts, since it seemed like this was being asked initially. :)
 

Zmanbaseball2

macrumors 68040
Aug 24, 2012
3,525
10
New York, USA
*Puts on admin hat for a moment*

Just so no one needs to wonder: we consider the use of "gay" or "retarded" to be inappropriate language, and we moderate them (when we see them). This applies to all uses that aren't actually referring to gay issues (like in PRSI), or to issues surrounding mental retardation as such.

Some members use these terms innocently, not realizing that they're not really PC in civil conversion. We usually get a "Sorry, I didn't mean it like that, I won't use it in future" sort of response when we send a reminder. Some members use them knowingly, to rile others up.

"OCD" isn't seen to be as bad by as many people, but it's a good idea to keep in mind that it is a diagnosis, and it might well be offensive to some if you use it lightly. It's really all about respect. We might moderate it, depending on how it's used.

If someone makes a comment such as "you've got OCD" it can sometimes fall between the inappropriate and insults categories. It's inappropriate no matter what, but whether or not it's insulting according to our rules depends to a great extent on intent. "You're retarded" however is considered both inappropriate (because of the use of retarded) and insulting (should be pretty clear that the intent here is basically to insult).

Ok, carry on. Just thought I'd clear that up from a perspective of using certain words or terms in posts, since it seemed like this was being asked initially. :)
Well said. Im glad you said that:)


Sent from my iPhone 5 using Tapatalk 2
 

chown33

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 9, 2009
8,495
4,504
Restivus
I've never been diagnosed but I have always secretly wondered. I do very odd things repetitively and often in multiples, or odd or even numbers of times. For example, I count every step I go up or down. I also count to verify each "flight" or change of direction in the stairs has the same number of stairs. If they do not, I go another level up or down, if possible, to verify at least the unevenness of the stairs remain the same floor to floor. If I take stairs and they end in an odd number of steps, I will sometimes take one step twice just to end on an even. It's silly and I know it is meaningless, but it drives me crazy to not do it so I just appease myself, as silly as it sounds.

I do several things that way. I find it very odd ...
Surely, you meant to say you find it very even. ;)
 

Brian Y

macrumors 68040
Oct 21, 2012
3,528
653
"OCD" has become a bit of popular culture, and everybody on the internet wants to be seen to have it - because it's "cool".

From my experience, people who have OCD don't go posting about it on the internet - and I apologise in advance if I offend anyone, but you can probably quite safely assume that anyone who says they have/boasts about having OCD on a tech forum (including most in this thread) probably don't (even if they think they do).

There are also various "grades" of OCD - walking up the stairs multiple times, or locking/unlocking your phone in a pattern, isn't what the diagnosis is about. By its very nature - an obsession (distressing thought) leads to a knowingly irrational compulsion which severely debilitates someone. I.e turning your phone on and off to check it's switched off isn't irrational/unrelated. Neither is putting things in a straight line on the table to ensure that you don't trip over them.

As I said, I mean absolutely no offence by this - but to put SMDBill's example of counting stairs/only wanting to go up an even number of stairs. That wouldn't be considered to be a symptom of OCD since it's more a "brain training" thing - something that you've trained yourself to subconsciously do. Now, say that every time you walked up a flight of stairs, you got an uncontrollable vivid thought of you stabbing every single one of your family members (obsession), and no matter how hard you try to think about something else, you can't (uncontrollable) - the only way you can stop the thought is by walking up an even number of stairs (irrelevant compulsive behaviour). If you walk up an odd number of stairs, your thoughts will come true and your family will be dead (irrational fear), and because of this, you cannot walk up an odd number of stairs under any circumstances. That would be a symptom of obsessive compulsive disorder. The fact that you "know it's meaningless" proves it's not.

Again, I apologise if I offend anyone - that's not what's meant by this post as I hope people will appreciate. But it does get tiresome hearing people throw around the term not just in "OH MY GOD IM OCD MY PHONE HAS A SCRATCH" but how it's seen to be "cool" and there's a "club". People who have cancer wouldn't go around throwing it into every post on a tech forum because it's not "cool" - and neither will anybody who genuinely suffers with OCD in it's true sense (which, whilst manageable, has been pretty much proven to be chronic). I hope my example in the previous paragraph shows this.

OCD is thrown around very lightly, but it's often deeper and darker than the majority of people, including most self diagnosees, think.