Odd Email from Dropbox.

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Traverse, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. Traverse macrumors 604

    Traverse

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    #1
    I used to use Dropbox all the time, but with my Office 365 subscription I moved to to OneDrive about 4 months ago and haven't used Dropbox since. I just got an email from "no-reply@dropboxmail.com" telling me my dropbox was lonely and reminding me what it can do.

    All other emails I have ever received from Dropbox came from "no-reply@dropbox.com". Do they really monitor account activity that closely? This email seemed strange to me.
     
  2. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    #2
    Seems that a lot of Dropbox phishing scams originate from that particular address.
     
  3. Traverse thread starter macrumors 604

    Traverse

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    #3
    So there are other reports of the @dropboxmail.com?

    Before I posted I did a very quick google search but didn't look thoroughly because I was working.
     
  4. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    #4
    Yeah, for a few years now.
     
  5. Traverse thread starter macrumors 604

    Traverse

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    #5
    Thank you. That confirms my suspicion. What bothers me is how they got my email. It's my personal one that never goes out to anyone. Aw well. Thanks again.
     
  6. Pakaku macrumors 68000

    Pakaku

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    #6
    Probably a mass-mailing where, by sending millions of emails, they hope to hook one or two legit victims.
     
  7. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #7
    Phising attempt, this occurs from time to time. I never click on a link in an email, regardless of the sender. I go to their main site and log in.

    Likewise, when I get called by a credit company stating there's an issue with my credit card, I hang up, and call the number on the back of my card.

    You can be too cautious in this day and age.
     
  8. Traverse thread starter macrumors 604

    Traverse

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    #8
    Good advice. I do the same thing. There is a Dropbox download link in the email, but I'd never use that. I would just go to Dropbox.com
     
  9. Darth.Titan macrumors 68030

    Darth.Titan

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    #9
    dropboxmail.com is a verified Dropbox domain.

    Considering the contents of the message, and the fact that dropboxmail.com is owned by Dropbox, Inc. I don't think I'd rush to say that this was a phishing attempt. Unless you check the mail headers and find something fishy, I'd say the email was legit.

    It's quite reasonable that their system would note a lack of activity on an account and send out a marketing email to try to bring you back in.
     
  10. jeremysteele macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    #10
    Do you know how insanely easy it is to modify the from address? Email addresses should never be used as an indicator of whether or not an email is legit. Even looking at headers can be difficult since many companies rely on third party email systems these days (sendgrid, AWS, etc)
     
  11. Darth.Titan macrumors 68030

    Darth.Titan

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    #11
    Calm down, I said to check the message headers because I'm quite aware how easy it is to spoof the from address in an email. It's usually also quite easy to determine by the message headers whether an email address is on the level, even if companies use "third party email systems".

    My point was the message content in no way implies that it was a phishing mail. I've received similar messages from Dropbox in the past, and you'll note that the OP's report of the message content said nothing of the usual "Click here to login" that a phishing mail would have.

    Like I said before, it looks to me like Dropbox noticed a lack of activity in the OP's account so they sent a standard marketing message to the email address on file. I just don't see anything hinky here.
     

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