ok WHAT IS RAID

iGary

Guest
May 26, 2004
19,583
0
Randy's House
I'mAMac said:
Is RAID an acronym or something or is it a word differing from the raid: to pillage and burn?
If you only typed "raid" into google or this site's search field, the answer would come easily.
 

cr2sh

macrumors 68030
May 28, 2002
2,554
1
downtown
  • Redundant Array of Independent/Inexpensive Disks, or RAID, a system of multiple hard drives for sharing or replicating data.
  • Raid (insecticide), a consumer insecticide marketed by S.C. Johnson & Son.
  • Raid (military), a sudden attack behind an enemy's lines without the intention of holding ground. Raid originates in the Scots from of the word road.
  • Raid (police action), when police invade a building or area.
  • Raid (robbery), an organized group of robbers, usually with transportation.
  • Raid (game maneuver), a sudden invasion by an allied group in a real life game (such as capture the flag) or in a simulated game. Raid in the context of computer games can also mean an instanced or outdoor encounter with a powerful opponent requiring a "raid group" of twenty or more players to defeat.
  • Corporate raid, a type of hostile takeover in business
  • Rally racing, a form of automobile racing.
  • Recherche Assistance Intervention Dissuasion, a counter-terrorist unit of the French National Police
  • Raid Script[1], a scripting language for the NewsRaider software to scrape websites into TomeRaider files
  • "Raid," a song by Madvillain from his album Madvillainy

I'm guessing it's the first definition you're interested in:

Via Wiki.

RAID
In computing, the acronym RAID (originally redundant array of inexpensive disks, now also known as redundant array of independent disks) refers to a data storage scheme using multiple hard drives to share or replicate data among the drives. Depending on the version chosen, the benefit of RAID is one or more of increased data integrity, fault-tolerance, throughput or capacity compared to single drives. In its original implementations, its key advantage was the ability to combine multiple low-cost devices using older technology into an array that offered greater capacity, reliability, speed, or a combination of these things, than was affordably available in a single device using the newest technology.

At the very simplest level, RAID combines multiple hard drives into a single logical unit. Thus, instead of seeing several different hard drives, the operating system sees only one. RAID is typically used on server computers, and is usually (but not necessarily) implemented with identically sized disk drives. With decreases in hard drive prices and wider availability of RAID options built into motherboard chipsets, RAID is also being found and offered as an option in more advanced personal computers. This is especially true in computers dedicated to storage-intensive tasks, such as video and audio editing.

The original RAID specification suggested a number of prototype "RAID levels", or combinations of disks. Each had theoretical advantages and disadvantages. Over the years, different implementations of the RAID concept have appeared. Most differ substantially from the original idealized RAID levels, but the numbered names have remained. This can be confusing, since one implementation of RAID 5, for example, can differ substantially from another. RAID 3 and RAID 4 are often confused and even used interchangeably.

The very definition of RAID has been argued over the years. The use of the term redundant leads many to object to RAID 0 being called a RAID at all. Similarly, the change from inexpensive to independent confuses many as to the intended purpose of RAID. There are even some single-disk implementations of the RAID concept. For the purpose of this article, we will say that any system which employs the basic RAID concepts to combine physical disk space for purposes of reliability, capacity, or performance (or even sociability — see the JBOD discussion) is a RAID system.
Or Something.
 

Mr. Mister

macrumors 6502
Feb 15, 2006
440
0
RAID = having your computer treat two or more hard drives as one. Through a variety of different modes, this can provide greater performance or greater reliability.
 

I'mAMac

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Aug 28, 2006
786
0
In a Mac box
cr2sh said:
  • Redundant Array of Independent/Inexpensive Disks, or RAID, a system of multiple hard drives for sharing or replicating data.
  • Raid (insecticide), a consumer insecticide marketed by S.C. Johnson & Son.
  • Raid (military), a sudden attack behind an enemy's lines without the intention of holding ground. Raid originates in the Scots from of the word road.
  • Raid (police action), when police invade a building or area.
  • Raid (robbery), an organized group of robbers, usually with transportation.
  • Raid (game maneuver), a sudden invasion by an allied group in a real life game (such as capture the flag) or in a simulated game. Raid in the context of computer games can also mean an instanced or outdoor encounter with a powerful opponent requiring a "raid group" of twenty or more players to defeat.
  • Corporate raid, a type of hostile takeover in business
  • Rally racing, a form of automobile racing.
  • Recherche Assistance Intervention Dissuasion, a counter-terrorist unit of the French National Police
  • Raid Script[1], a scripting language for the NewsRaider software to scrape websites into TomeRaider files
  • "Raid," a song by Madvillain from his album Madvillainy

I'm guessing it's the first definition you're interested in:



Or Something.
thank you