Old british cars

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by elf69, Jun 20, 2016.

  1. elf69 macrumors 65816

    elf69

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2016
    Location:
    Cornwall UK
    #1
    OK I know there is a car thread here.

    I live in Britain and have a love of all car old and British.

    I have a 1969 Riley Elf (I also run the owners club website, no I do not run the club)

    I have a 1966 Austin 1100 (the Austin America in USA of course) this is donor car for the 1972 Austin.

    I also have a 1972 Austin 1300 Vandan Plas Princess.

    My 1972 is one of only 3 made in this particular trim/colour combination.

    Will get photos up soon.

    What classic brit cars do you own?
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #2
    Would love to see a picture of the Riley Elf.

    While I don't own any, I must admit that I do love some of those old sixties (and early seventies) cars from Britain.

    Personal favourites include the MGs, that wonderful - nay, sublime, - E-Type Jaguar, and the Rover P5.
     
  3. border terrier, Jun 20, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2016

    border terrier macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2013
    Location:
    England
    #3
    I don't own any these days but I used to own a 1968 Ford Escort Mexico rally car and a 1969 Lotus Elan S4 SE DHC which I spent 3000 hours restoring to its former glory.

    If I bought a classic again it would have to be a 1966/67 Lotus Elan S3 SE coupe in 'Lotus safety' yellow.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. elf69 thread starter macrumors 65816

    elf69

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2016
    Location:
    Cornwall UK
    #4
    This is my Elf the day we picked it up.

    It is really a mini with a bigger boot and fancy nose.
    everything in middle is mini.

    poor quality as really crappy camera at time.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #5
    My father is a bit on a British car collector. He's own a number of classics over the years. Right now he has a Triumph GT-6 and a Land Rover Series III (SWB, soft top). Both restored, the LR from the ground up. British cars have this unique charm you can't find elsewhere.

    @bunnspecial will gladly partake in this convo. He has an MG B.
     
  6. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #6
    I love all things MG :)

    IMG_2880.JPG

    And MGs as far as the eye can see :)

    IMG_2856.jpg
     
  7. elf69 thread starter macrumors 65816

    elf69

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2016
    Location:
    Cornwall UK
    #7
    MGB-GT are great except when the stupid rubber bumper version came out!

    my dad loves restoring old cars.

    my 1972 austin has had the whole nose almost hand made as front panel cost far too much.
    photos on my mac too big to upload will shrink and upload possibly tonite on my imac
    --- Post Merged, Jun 20, 2016 ---
    Here is some off my facebook album

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    All that grey primer is covering new metal gas welded in...
    [​IMG]
     
  8. colourfastt macrumors 6502a

    colourfastt

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    #8
    Sadly none, but my ideal if I could only have one: Morgan!!!
     
  9. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #9
    Believe it or not, I very nearly bought a rubber bumper GT a few weeks ago and haven't yet ruled it out completely.

    RB GTs are reasonably uncommon in the US with only 1200 and some having been imported. The RB came with the 74.5 MY, and GT imports ceased with the 75 my.

    There's a certain practical appeal about the combination. The GT is-obviously-a fair bit roomier and the RBs don't have to be babied as much as chrome.

    My 70 Tourer isn't going anywhere, but i think that the GT would be a nice complement to it.
     
  10. JJM macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Location:
    Chicago
    #10
    How could anyone forget British Leyland's TR6??? Especially in British Racing Green? Man, did I want to save up up all my Summer job money and buy this. Parents said "NO!". Still remains my favorite car.

    1974_Triumph_TR6_Roadster_Front_1.jpg

    1974_Triumph_TR6_Roadster_Rear_1.jpg
     
  11. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
  12. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
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    #12
    I have really fallen in love with these

    IMG_2844.JPG

    What's not to love about a car that's basically an MGA with a full size 4-door saloon body on it?

    BTW, I took my car down to a local shop that specializes in MGs this morning to have the new convertible top(that I've had since December) fitted.

    They had an Midget with Ontario plates parked in the garage. Apparently someone got a bit "handsy" at the show on Thursday and broke one of the retaining bolts on the clutch master. The guy had made it to Frankfort(60 miles) but couldn't manage any further and was stuck here until the new master came in. I had one in my boot that is waiting for me to find the time to install it, although the B and Midget M/Cs are(obviously) different so that was a no-go.
     
  13. vkd macrumors 6502a

    vkd

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2012
    #13
    Triumph Spitfire 1500

    Looks fantastic, roadholding completely the opposite. DO NOT drive at over 60 MPH except in a straight line on a flat road!


    [​IMG]
     
  14. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #14
    Ahh yes-Triumphs did always go for looks over handling :)

    Compare that to an MGB with good tires, which feels quite firmly planted at 50mph+ on nice, tight, twisty roads
     
  15. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #15
    @vkd In all seriousness, if your Spitfire has as poor of cornering ability as you state, I'd take a serious look at the suspension. The Spitfire, with its pseudo-independent rear suspension(compared to the live axle on most others), had a good reputation in the day for being one of the better handling British sports cars on the road, a type of car that in general is well regarded for its handling rather than all-out speed.

    Unfortunately, LBCs often have their tires neglected, and you should probably change them once every decade or so regardless of the amount of wear on them.

    Take a good look at ALL your suspension components. Spitfires have a single leaf spring in the rear that straddles the differential. It will almost always sag over time, and in extreme cases will break a leaf. I drove around in my MG for a little while with a broken leaf on one side, and it makes the handling REALLY unpredictable.

    Check ALL the rubber suspension components, as rubber is a perishable item and bushings at best are good for 20 years-usually less. If you don't mind throwing a bunch of money at it, neoprene bushings not only stiffen the ride but also last nearly forever-the downside is that they're 5-10x the cost of rubber. I spent about $10 for a full new set of rubber bushings on the rear of my car(both sides) and the neoprene set is around $90. Wear in the front kingpins, tie rod ends, and steering rack can all cause issues.

    Look at your shocks. In the best case, you may want to top the oil up in them if it's low/missing(an Armstrong shock won't work without oil in it). There's a lot of debate about the correct oil for these-I know a lot of folks who swear by SAE 20 motorcycle fork oil, although I worry about the pressure that an oil that heavy puts on the seals of an old shock. It also gives a fairly firm ride. I use dirt cheap SAE 10 hydraulic oil from Napa, which has is close to the factory weight and gives a good compromise between handling and ride quality. Be sure you clean the area around the fill port before removing it, and work the shock while adding oil to be sure it gets everywhere it needs to go. If your shocks won't hold oil, considering sending them off for rebuild or installing reconditioned units-I'm a big believer in retaining Armstrong shocks where originally installed. Tube shock conversions are available, but pay careful attention to how they attach-I've seen some that have the potential to be down right dangerous if they come lose while simultaneously doing a poor job of actually securing the shock.

    Finally, I've seen cars that folks claimed couldn't handle well, and unfortunately I've found that the biggest issue was in the big nut that's behind the steering wheel. There's no a lot that can be done for that, unfortunately.
     
  16. mojolicious macrumors 68000

    mojolicious

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    Location:
    Sarf London
    #16
    I had an absolutely shagged Triumph Vitesse convertible when I was at university, with the customary concrete fence post lying across the boot. For the last year the roof was broken. Luckily it came with a tonneau cover with a zip-out section for the driver, so I drove like that. Was okay unless stationary in rain, when water would pool on the tonneau and flood into your lap when turning left or braking...

    Can't say I miss the car itself, but I miss the 'immediacy' of old cars. With all the driver aids and safety gear, a modern car feels bloated and overly insulated from the outside world.

    A TR5 for sunny weekends (ha!) would be good.
     
  17. vkd macrumors 6502a

    vkd

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2012
    #17
    First, thanks for your in-depth and thorough explanation. Unfortunately I parted company with my Spitfire way back in 1988! Perhaps if I'd had your advice back in the day my relationship with the car would've been more fruitful. LOL

    My basic understanding of the rear suspension is that, as you describe the transverse leaf spring design led to the rear tyres in normal loading conditions to have a slight topside inclination towards the inside when viewed from the rear of the vehicle. When subjected to centrifugal force, such as in cornering at speed, loading conditions change significantly enough to create rear end lift. This in turn causes the tyres to swap from topside inclination towards the inside to a more vertical posture and even outside inclination. End result: loss of traction and tendency for the rear of the car to slide sideways. It happened to me a couple of times; once I mounted the kerb sideways on and ended up in the hedgerow and the second time swerving from right to left at speed on both sides of the road in order to regain control. Luckily nothing was coming the other way otherwise I am sure I would not be here to tell the tale! I was told at the time to keep a back of cement in the boot to hold it down LOL.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 22, 2016 ---
    There you go. My advice to stabilise my Spitfire 1500 was to keep a bag of cement in the boot. :)
     
  18. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #18
    As a teenager I always wanted one of these.

    image.jpeg

    Now I couldn't afford one given how much a good one would cost.
     
  19. Zenithal macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #19
    I forgot to post this back in December, but I spotted a London Black Taxi. It was a TX1, IIRC. It had been converted to LHD.
     
  20. OLDCODGER macrumors 6502a

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    Lucky Country
  21. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #21
    I love Big Healeys.

    My wallet doesn't...
     
  22. Benjamin Frost Suspended

    Benjamin Frost

    Joined:
    May 9, 2015
    Location:
    London, England
    #22
    Great thread!

    I’ll be posting some photos. Can't beat classic cars. It's incredible how much more beautiful cars used to be back then. It's a shame that, due, I guess, to safety laws, we've lost that beauty. And that beauty spanned all car manufacturers from Rolls Royce to Fiat.

    I'm sad that things are so much uglier today, from clothes to music to architecture to art to countryside to cars, but at least we can still enjoy the fruits of yesteryear in a limited fashion.
     
  23. OllyW Moderator

    OllyW

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Location:
    The Black Country, England
    #23
    My friend is currently restoring one. The prices he's had to pay for genuine parts is unbelievable but it's going to be worth a lot of money when it's finished.
     
  24. elf69 thread starter macrumors 65816

    elf69

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2016
    Location:
    Cornwall UK
    #24
    I cant wait to get my black 1300 back on road.

    been in workshop since 2008.

    love classics but forced to drive newer (1998) car at moment.

    My black austin is worth up to £6K when finished.
    Not a lot really but worth more to me as it is one of only 3 made and I saved it.

    It will be my daily driver and show car..... one day lol
     
  25. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #25
    I very much doubt that it is safety laws that have caused the deterioration in visual quality in many modern cars; rather, it is cost. Reliability - and a reputation for lacking reliability, which is something that really is non-negotiable when driving - cost some of the more stylish cars a lot more in lost sales than perceived safety flaws.

    Moreover I suspect that it may be perfectly possible to design a safe, and gorgeous looking car, but it may cost too much to do so, especially if cars must be able to successfully translate cross platform.

    Besides, these days, while few car manufacturers have their own designers in-house to the same extent that they used to, designers, such as the Italian company Pininfarina, have designed some lovely production cars.
     

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