Old SSD

alexburton

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 21, 2013
18
0
Europe
Hi, I am going to buy a new mbp retina but I would like to use my old SSD 840 pro, do you know if I could just put the SSD on the new mbp and have directly all my files?? Thanks!!
 

yjchua95

macrumors 604
Apr 23, 2011
6,725
230
GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
Hi, I am going to buy a new mbp retina but I would like to use my old SSD 840 pro, do you know if I could just put the SSD on the new mbp and have directly all my files?? Thanks!!
No you can't. The late-2013 rMBPs use a blade PCIe SSD. It's a totally different connection altogether.

Buy a USB3/Thunderbolt enclosure for your 840 Pro and transfer it to your rMBP that way.
 

alexburton

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 21, 2013
18
0
Europe
I have already an external hdd which I use for time machine, another external which I use for music pictures movies.. So I don't think I need one more.. I'll just go for the mbp retina with 256 gb SSD, it's 200 euros more than the mbp retina 128 gb.. But ok..
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
64,105
30,703
Boston
I have already an external hdd which I use for time machine, another external which I use for music pictures movies.. So I don't think I need one more.. I'll just go for the mbp retina with 256 gb SSD, it's 200 euros more than the mbp retina 128 gb.. But ok..
I think moving up from a 128GB SSD to the 256 is a safe bet and I highly recommend it. You'll run out of storage imo, pretty quickly with the 128
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,449
5,664
[[ I have already an external hdd which I use for time machine, another external which I use for music pictures movies.. So I don't think I need one more.. ]]

Yes, you DO need one more.

You need an external, BOOTABLE clone of your internal drive. Or, at the very least, you need a fully-bootable external copy of the OS.

You can't boot from a Time Machine backup. Not a "full boot", anyway. By "full boot" I mean that the computer boots to the finder, and you can then run any app you want or move files as required.

Someone above said it right:
Get an external enclosure and put the old drive into it.
Test it, so that you know it can boot the new MacBook in an emergency.

Sooner or later, you're going to have an "I can't boot!" moment. This is where having a bootable cloned backup makes things MUCH easier....
 

alexburton

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 21, 2013
18
0
Europe
Yes you have right on this, I might need a bootable back up disk..but I think ill use the SSD for time machine and the other hdd as bootable disk.. The only thing is that I don't know if I can trust the SSD for time machine..
 

Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
29,356
8,967
California
Yes you have right on this, I might need a bootable back up disk..but I think ill use the SSD for time machine and the other hdd as bootable disk.. The only thing is that I don't know if I can trust the SSD for time machine..
Why not? Were you having trouble with it before?

An SSD will work just fine for a backup.
 

alexburton

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 21, 2013
18
0
Europe
No I didn't have any problem, I ve heard that the hdd are more trustworthy than the ssd.. I don't know if it's true..
 

5to1

macrumors 6502
Mar 9, 2008
302
48
[[ I have already an external hdd which I use for time machine, another external which I use for music pictures movies.. So I don't think I need one more.. ]]

Yes, you DO need one more.

You need an external, BOOTABLE clone of your internal drive. Or, at the very least, you need a fully-bootable external copy of the OS.

You can't boot from a Time Machine backup. Not a "full boot", anyway. By "full boot" I mean that the computer boots to the finder, and you can then run any app you want or move files as required.

Someone above said it right:
Get an external enclosure and put the old drive into it.
Test it, so that you know it can boot the new MacBook in an emergency.

Sooner or later, you're going to have an "I can't boot!" moment. This is where having a bootable cloned backup makes things MUCH easier....
Firstly not everyone DOES need that level of backup/mitigation against drive failure. Provided their data is recoverable many people can live without it until the machine is repaired (replacing SSD under warranty or otherwise, or reinstalling OS then restoring from time machine).

Secondly, why on earth would it be prudent to use an expensive (in terms of £/GB) SSD for such a rare occurrence? If one really does need that level of backup/mitigation against drive failure, isn't it far more prudent to use a conventional external HDD with a far lower cost per GB?

IMO OP if you have no use for the SSD, recoup as much as you can for it. Its a rapidly depreciating item which is fair enough if you're making use of it, but silly to keep around to hold a backup you'll likely never use :/
 

Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
29,356
8,967
California
No I didn't have any problem, I ve heard that the hdd are more trustworthy than the ssd.. I don't know if it's true..
Nah... SSD is fine. The difference is usually a HDD will start throwing errors or maybe making some odd noises before it dies. With SSDs when they do die it seems like the controller inside goes bad and they just all of a sudden stop working with no warning. But I don't think they are otherwise any less reliable.

That said, I have not really seen any definitive studies on the topic.