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furam90

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 15, 2010
251
230
So the watch is supposed to prompt your PIN once it breaks skin contact right?

Well, I've been playing around with it and apparently theres a small gap between the time you take it off and when it locks.

I've been able to successfully take off my watch and then just put my fingers underneath right after and it doesn't lock at all. As a matter of fact, it actually bugged it out to the point where it wouldn't lock again until I restarted the device. Try it out for yourself.

I think this is kind of a big security flaw as it leaves the watch open to theft or unwanted access to your information, no?
 
Last edited:

MartyCan

macrumors 68000
Oct 31, 2012
1,512
351
Near Toronto, ON
So the watch is supposed to prompt your PIN once it breaks skin contact right?

Well, I've been playing around with it and apparently theres a small gap between the time you take it off and when it locks.

I've been able to successfully take off my watch and then just put my fingers underneath right after and it doesn't lock at all. As a matter of fact, it actually bugged it out to the point where it wouldn't lock again until I restarted the device. Try it out for yourself.

I think this is kind of a big security flaw as it leaves the watch open to theft, no?
If your watch is stolen once it breaks contact with your phone it becomes kinda useless doesn't it?
 

AFDoc

macrumors 68030
Jun 29, 2012
2,810
557
Colorado Springs USA for now
The fact that it's a watch leaves it open to theft..... Not sure exactly what you're point is.

IF you mean some one could "take over" your watch then sure, that may be a problem. However not every one will have the pass code feature on.... my wife doesn't.
 

furam90

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 15, 2010
251
230
If your watch is stolen once it breaks contact with your phone it becomes kinda useless doesn't it?

I think you can restore the device from the watch interface.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204567 <--Oddly enough the info on Apple's site is wrong, you can erase the device from your wrist, but not by the force touch it describes in the link above.

It's an option in General->Settings

----------

The fact that it's a watch leaves it open to theft..... Not sure exactly what you're point is.

IF you mean some one could "take over" your watch then sure, that may be a problem. However not every one will have the pass code feature on.... my wife doesn't.

Well the idea is a would be thief would be deterred from stealing the watch because the watch wouldn't be able to be used if its protected by the PIN. IF there's no PIN, the thief can Erase and restore and use as his own.
 
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furam90

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 15, 2010
251
230
You haven't dealt with many thieves in your life have you?

No, but I do know that thieves can be rational. iPhone theft is significantly down since the advent of Activation lock

Once a hot item for thieves and pickpockets, Apple's iPhone is becoming a significantly less attractive target as the company's Activation Lock prevents the devices from being easily wiped and re-sold, a new report indicates.

http://appleinsider.com/articles/15...thefts-down-40-in-san-fracisco-25-in-new-york

So the idea that Apple watch's lock-- its main security feature on something worn on your wrist-- is easily bypassable should be a big issue.
 
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MartyCan

macrumors 68000
Oct 31, 2012
1,512
351
Near Toronto, ON
What I mean is that a thief would not be able to use any personal info from the watch wothout it's connection to the iPhone it is paired with.

I think that was the concern of the OP and for sure is a bigger issue than a stolen Watch unless it were an Edition.
 

AFDoc

macrumors 68030
Jun 29, 2012
2,810
557
Colorado Springs USA for now
No, but I do know that thieves can be rational. iPhone theft is significantly down since the advent of Activation lock



So the idea that Apple watch's lock-- its main security feature on something worn on your wrist-- is easily bypassable should be a big issue.

Hard numbers showing thefts of iPhone down? You're probably talking about the story from Feb 11 of this year but where are they getting their numbers? "From officials in those cities"...... what officials? Police reports? PLUS that was in 3 cities studied..... no mention if thefts went up in other locations. Not saying it doesn't help but the fact that something can be pass locked doesn't mean it won't get stolen.
 

alxz1194

macrumors member
Sep 30, 2007
99
13
If your watch is stolen once it breaks contact with your phone it becomes kinda useless doesn't it?

Well what if the person has added CCs for use with Apple Pay? Of course you'd cancel the cards, but I imagine between the period its stolen and when you call, they'd be able to make purchases (even if you can later have the bank refund you)? This would kind of be a big security issue if it in fact doesn't lock when you do what the OP described
 

xraydoc

macrumors demi-god
Oct 9, 2005
8,570
2,656
192.168.1.1
So the watch is supposed to prompt your PIN once it breaks skin contact right?

Well, I've been playing around with it and apparently theres a small gap between the time you take it off and when it locks.

I've been able to successfully take off my watch and then just put my fingers underneath right after and it doesn't lock at all. As a matter of fact, it actually bugged it out to the point where it wouldn't lock again until I restarted the device. Try it out for yourself.

I think this is kind of a big security flaw as it leaves the watch open to theft, no?
If there wasn't this delay the watch could lock itself repeatedly during the day if it comes off your skin for a second, especially for those who wear the watch loosely.

I would strongly suspect that the slight delay is by specific design.
 

furam90

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 15, 2010
251
230
Hard numbers showing thefts of iPhone down? You're probably talking about the story from Feb 11 of this year but where are they getting their numbers? "From officials in those cities"...... what officials? Police reports? PLUS that was in 3 cities studied..... no mention if thefts went up in other locations. Not saying it doesn't help but the fact that something can be pass locked doesn't mean it won't get stolen.

I think they were from crime statistics based on police reports. 3 of the worlds biggest cities is a pretty big sample size. Of course a passlock doesn't prevent all theft but it can deter it.

But it's not just theft, as you said before someone can take full control of the device and get all your information. Someone else in the thread mentioned apple pay via the CC on the watch. Didn't even think about that, that's a danger.

I think if they sped up the lock just a bit it would be much more effective. Right now it's way too slow.
 

zmunkz

macrumors 6502a
Nov 4, 2007
921
229
As a matter of fact, it actually bugged it out to the point where it wouldn't lock again until I restarted the device. Try it out for yourself.

I am not fussed about the dealy, but this part you mentioned has me wondering. Can you elaborate how to reproduce this part?
 
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