Optimum temperatures for MacBook Pro retina display 13"

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Applefanboy8153, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. Applefanboy8153 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2012
    #1
    Hi, I purchased a new MacBook Pro retina display 13" (it is with apple right now for diagnosing the problem) anyways i sent it in as it was overheating and the temps were going up to 52 degrees Celsius. I want to know if the temps are alright and whether I overreacted.
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Yes, you overreacted. 52C is quite normal and well within safe operating limits. If you're not already doing so, use iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) to get accurate readings of your temps, fan speeds, etc., rather than relying on your sense of touch or sound. A forum member has posted a copy of iStat Pro that has been "tweaked" to enhance compatibility with Mountain Lion. You can download it here.

    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level.

    If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC.
    (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  3. Applefanboy8153 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2012
    #3
    Thanks! For the quick reply...my fans trouble me, they go upto 7000rpm and one of them even went into -ves! Don't know how, I use istat pro
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    As stated in my post, try resetting your SMC. If that doesn't help, let Apple check it out.
     
  5. Applefanboy8153 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2012
    #5
    I reset the SMC thrice without any effect so I sent in for service. I also called Apple about it and they asked me not to turn on the mac as it is too hot and it should not go over 50C. Guess I was a victim of a misinformed customer care executive.
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    Yes, they definitely don't know what they're talking about. Temps in the 50-80C range are extremely normal, and even higher temps are normal for resource-intensive work.
     
  7. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    Dec 11, 2008
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    #7
    Definitely I run several 15" MBP`s and a 13" Air and the Pro`s can hit over 100C under full load and the Air can easily surpass 90C. For older Mac`s 50C is a pretty decent idle temp, don't worry your Mac is well within it`s limits.
     
  8. fatlardo macrumors 6502

    fatlardo

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    #8
    GGJstudios,

    Although I know these are all safe temps for the CPU, do you think in the past it is the root cause of most logic boards deaths? What's your opinion bout that?
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    Mac logic boards are designed to operate for many years with the normal operating temperature ranges of the components factored in. I'd say the root cause of most logic board deaths (apart from accidents such as spills) is manufacturing defects. Apple sells over a million Macs per month and only a miniscule fraction of those suffer logic board deaths.
     
  10. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

    Joined:
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    #10
    High temperature is not so detrimental as one would think (within specifications), what is far more damaging is "thermal shock" which occurs when a thermal gradient causes different parts/components of an object to expand by differing amounts. This differential expansion can be explained in the terms of stress or of strain, equivalently. At some point, this stress can exceed the strength of the material, causing a crack to form. If nothing stops this crack from propagating through the material, it will cause the object's structure to fail.

    Essentially it`s the reoccurring rapid cycling of extreme temperature that is more likely to cause damage to the Logic Board, resulting in a fracture to one of the component joints. The way to combat this is to take control of the cooling plan and elevate the rear of the system, reducing the thermal gradient by changing temperature at a slower rate.

    Much of this is taken into account at the design stage, equally if you want to prolong the life of a MBP under heavy load, it`s worth considering, and certainly wont hurt. I have one with over 35K operating hours, still all original.
     
  11. Doward macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    #11
    I pulled my late 2011 MBP 17" apart, checked the heatsink (very poorly finished) and the thermal paste (WAY too much of it was applied) - I lapped the heatsink, properly applied some Arctic Silver 5, and now my current temp (after using it for the past 6-8 hours no less - I'm at work) is 43C.

    That's with Chrome open (10 tabs), Colloquy, iTunes playing, 2 terminals open and Adium online.

    When I'm doing some intensive compiling, or specifically when rendering in FCPX, I do get temps all the way up to 92C-93C, fans @ 4500-5500rpm, and no CPU throttling at all.

    Temps when playing StarCraft 2 are usually ~80C, 3500-4000rpm fan speeds.
     

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