Options for external thunderbolt drive using my own SSD?

Boe11

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 12, 2010
516
23
Hey folks,

I have a samsung 840 512gb ssd that I'm no longer using and I'd like to put it in an external thunderbolt enclosure and use it for editing video with my rMBP. I have a 2tb usb3 drive that I currently use and will still use that for bulk storage, but I thought the ssd and thunderbolt would work well for current projects I'm working on.

This Lacie Rugged option looks like the cheapest route, but can anyone confirm whether or not I can crack it open and put my SSD in?
http://store.apple.com/us/product/HA384ZM/A/lacie-1tb-rugged-usb-30-thunderbolt-series-hard-drive?fnode=5f

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

Ifti

macrumors 68020
Dec 14, 2010
2,252
422
UK
Hey folks,

I have a samsung 840 512gb ssd that I'm no longer using and I'd like to put it in an external thunderbolt enclosure and use it for editing video with my rMBP. I have a 2tb usb3 drive that I currently use and will still use that for bulk storage, but I thought the ssd and thunderbolt would work well for current projects I'm working on.

This Lacie Rugged option looks like the cheapest route, but can anyone confirm whether or not I can crack it open and put my SSD in?
http://store.apple.com/us/product/HA384ZM/A/lacie-1tb-rugged-usb-30-thunderbolt-series-hard-drive?fnode=5f

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
I had exactly the same drive and decided to sell it instead after reading SSDs have a much shorter life the HDDs and the constant writes with rendering is not suited to an SSD?

Nevertheless, you could alway buy a 500GB Buffalo MiniStation Thunderbolt drive - which comes with both ThunderBolt and USB3.0 connections - then you have the best of both worlds (PC and MAC). Opening the drive up is pretty straight foward, and you can us eyour own SSD fine.

Personally, I use a 1TB Buffalo Ministation ThunderBolt for when I need to edit and be portable etc. Although its a HDD, Ive still found it to be more then adequate for FCPX. When Im editing at home I use a Drobo 5D instead.
 

Boe11

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 12, 2010
516
23
Thanks guys. I'll have to think it over but may end up just selling the drive.
 

Ifti

macrumors 68020
Dec 14, 2010
2,252
422
UK
Thanks guys. I'll have to think it over but may end up just selling the drive.
You'll get a good price if you sell - enough to cover a 1TB Buffalo Ministation Thunderbolt, with cash to spare!
 

LaCieTech

macrumors member
Jul 18, 2012
80
1
As long as your SSD drive is of a standard size and has standardized screw holes (which it should) We don't see why it would not fit into the enclosure. Of course modifying the Rugged drive in this manner would void the manufacturers warranty. All the best. ~TE

Hey folks,

I have a samsung 840 512gb ssd that I'm no longer using and I'd like to put it in an external thunderbolt enclosure and use it for editing video with my rMBP. I have a 2tb usb3 drive that I currently use and will still use that for bulk storage, but I thought the ssd and thunderbolt would work well for current projects I'm working on.

This Lacie Rugged option looks like the cheapest route, but can anyone confirm whether or not I can crack it open and put my SSD in?
http://store.apple.com/us/product/HA384ZM/A/lacie-1tb-rugged-usb-30-thunderbolt-series-hard-drive?fnode=5f

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

mooncaine

macrumors regular
Dec 19, 2004
154
1
Nevertheless, you could alway buy a 500GB Buffalo MiniStation Thunderbolt drive - which comes with both ThunderBolt and USB3.0 connections - then you have the best of both worlds (PC and MAC). Opening the drive up is pretty straight foward,....
It is? I'm holding a dead 1TB Ministation right now, and I don't even see much of a seam. No screws or fasteners....

[I bought this 2 weeks ago, and dropped it before I even had a chance to write a file to it. It fell about 3 feet onto a carpeted floor (because I stood up, forgetting that it was plugged into my laptop). Didn't seem like a hard impact, but the drive was plugged in to Thunderbolt and mounted. Now it is useless.]

This costly lesson may help me remember to treat them more like tiny glass cabinets full of expensive glass knicknacks.

I kinda want to crack this open and get some use out of it.
 

Ifti

macrumors 68020
Dec 14, 2010
2,252
422
UK
It is? I'm holding a dead 1TB Ministation right now, and I don't even see much of a seam. No screws or fasteners....

[I bought this 2 weeks ago, and dropped it before I even had a chance to write a file to it. It fell about 3 feet onto a carpeted floor (because I stood up, forgetting that it was plugged into my laptop). Didn't seem like a hard impact, but the drive was plugged in to Thunderbolt and mounted. Now it is useless.]

This costly lesson may help me remember to treat them more like tiny glass cabinets full of expensive glass knicknacks.

I kinda want to crack this open and get some use out of it.
Yes. The white plastic part comes away from the metal caddy. It's currently held in with double sided tape so it's tough to get off, but its easier if you use a hair dryer to heat up the bottom first as it makes the tape less tacky.
Once open there are some screws to remove and another bracket to remove (held on with clips) and you can then change the drive.
Not the easiest to get to, but definately doable.