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AppleGoat

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Oct 14, 2010
655
8
Lately, I've gotten back into chess. Given how CPU-intensive Chess is and how much of a sweat my machine works up -- is the challenge of the game in proportion to the speed of the processor? Say, you had two machines, one with a Core2Duo and another with the latest Hawell quad-core, would the computer with the Haswell chip offer a more challenging game of chess?
 

disasterdrone

macrumors 6502
Aug 31, 2013
300
0
Lately, I've gotten back into chess. Given how CPU-intensive Chess is and how much of a sweat my machine works up -- is the challenge of the game in proportion to the speed of the processor? Say, you had two machines, one with a Core2Duo and another with the latest Hawell quad-core, would the computer with the Haswell chip offer a more challenging game of chess?

In theory. In practice it's likely that the algorithm in that chess implementation is going to be the limiting factor.
 

AppleGoat

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Oct 14, 2010
655
8
In theory. In practice it's likely that the algorithm in that chess implementation is going to be the limiting factor.

Thanks -- I thought about the software being the limiting factor. I would imagine a better chip will play faster though.
 

simon48

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2010
1,315
88
I'm sure the challenge the same. A faster CPU will just allow the computer take less time to decide on its move.
 

disasterdrone

macrumors 6502
Aug 31, 2013
300
0
I'm sure the challenge the same. A faster CPU will just allow the computer take less time to decide on its move.

Theoretically playing tight time limits with a slower chip might limit the computer's ability to explore trees, but I don't think it's going to be a real issue.
 
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