OS X Server + VPN: How to make it configure the Airport?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by micsaund, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. micsaund macrumors 6502

    micsaund

    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    #1
    Hi all,

    I'm trying to setup OS X Server so that I can connect via a VPN while I'm on the road and effectively bounce all of my traffic through my cable modem at home. The structure of my network is:

    internet<-->Airport Extreme<-->192.168.1.xxx network (including the OS X Server machine)

    During the Server installation, I provided the password to my Airport Extreme believing that it would be configured automatically to accept incoming connections on the VPN ports and send them to the Server machine.

    However, I ran a Shields-up scan on my external IP and didn't see any ports listed as 'open'. When I open the Airport Utility, I don't see any ports forwarded either.

    I have enabled L2TP, given a starting and ending range in the 192.168.1.xx space. In Client Information, I supplied DNS servers and added a "private" route for 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0.

    Is there something I need to do differently to make it configure my Airport to forward VPN packets to itself? I know I can enter the ports manually in the Airport, but one of OS X Server's selling points is that it will configure the Airport for you, and I'd rather use that.

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  2. gdc macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    #2
    Did you get this working?

    Just wondering if you worked this out as I would like to have exactly this setup (Mac OS 10.6 Server vpn routing my external browsing out through my home ISP, and have Server configure the ports for my Airport Extreme).

    Thanks in advance.
     
  3. pauldacheez macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    #3
    It's likely that you need to forward the ports manually.

    Apple has a nice support page that lists what TCP/UDP ports their products use.
    All are UDP with the exception of 1723 (TCP).
     

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