OSX Admin Tools

Discussion in 'macOS' started by aesc80, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. aesc80 macrumors 6502

    aesc80

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    #1
    Ever since I got my new iMac this past month, I've been immersing myself with OSX and some of its administrative tools. While I use Activity Monitor for nearly everything, I learned from this forum of other tools, like memtest, that I normally didn't work with before. I'm aware of most of the console tools (ifconfig, netstat, top, etc.), but I'd be interested in what most OSX vets use for administration tools. Any would work, from hardware test and analysis, to network mapping and firewall rules. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    One of the main attractions to me of OS X was that you don't have to "monkey around under the hood" as much as I did on Windows. You don't need any admin tools unless you're troubleshooting a particular issue. OS X takes care of itself without requiring any interference from the user.
     
  3. aesc80 thread starter macrumors 6502

    aesc80

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    #3
    True, though I can't help but to love system dashboards. After working with my MBP for over a year, I've never had to tinker with the configurations to "dial it in".

    I'm willing to bet most of the replies will be "Activity Monitor is all you ever need" type of response, though I'm open to any other beloved favorites from a longer seasoned OSX community.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    How "seasoned" a user is won't change the answers. OS X requires no action on the user's part to "tweak" or "tune" or "maintain" it. Many who migrate from Windows to OS X bring with them the "Windows mentality" that they need to manually intervene to make sure OS X runs optimally, or that they need to take an active role in maintaining the OS. Some app developers prey on this false notion by offering apps that purportedly assist in these unnecessary efforts.

    You don't need "cleaner" or "maintenance" apps to keep your Mac running well, and some of these apps can do more harm than good. Most only remove files/folders or unused languages or architectures, which does nothing more than free up some drive space, with the risk of deleting something important in the process.
    These apps will not make your Mac run faster or more efficiently, since having stuff stored on a drive does not impact performance, unless you're running out of drive space. In fact, deleting some caches can hurt performance, rather than help it, since more system resources are used and performance suffers while each cache is being rebuilt.
    Many of these tasks should only be done selectively to troubleshoot specific problems, not en masse as routine maintenance. OS X does a good job of taking care of itself, without the need for 3rd party software. Among other things, it has its own maintenance scripts that run silently in the background on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, without user intervention.
     
  5. aesc80 thread starter macrumors 6502

    aesc80

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    #5
    Got it! I appreciate the feedback!
     

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