Other tutorials for pc to Mac convert?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by scooterguitar, Mar 7, 2008.

  1. scooterguitar macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    #1
    So within 24 hours I decided to snag my first Mac, have never even used one! I am fairly agile around a pc, but wanted a fresh start as I basically wanted a Macbook for Garageband and recording music, but plan to use it for other basic needs as well.

    So, I have looked and relooked at everything I cna find on Apple's site on the converting from pc. Are there any other sites or suggestions that will help jumpstart me when it arrives next week? Just basic overviews of how to jump head first is great! The apple site stuff is decent, but I wish when it shows screenshots it had links to hit as if you were working on ana ctual mca ya know.

    I'm actually excited to explore and learn a new operating system, but don't want to sit there idle for an hour just figuring out how to hop on the net!

    Thanks for any help or suggestions!
     
  2. MurphyM macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    #2
    Since you asked, I know an EXCELLENT site:

    http://murphymac.com - There are a ton of screencasts to help with various tasks.

    There are categories for Beginner and Advanced as well as different applications.

    http://macosxhints.com is an excellent resource, you can't miss it if you google for mac stuff. Tons of stuff there, some of it kind of quirky.
     
  3. scooterguitar thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    #3
    Hey thanks for the fast help!
    I'll dig into them this weekend.

    btw, I lied...this past summer I tried using a Mac at a public facility to get online and check my mail...spent about 5 minutes on it and couldn't figure anything out:eek:
     
  4. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    51.50024, -0.12662
    #4
    welcome to Macs! youll definately enjoy it. once you go Mac you never go bac :p

    did you have a look at Apple's Find Out How video tutorials? theres also getting started tutorials for the MacBook here

    this site is also very good too.
     
  5. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    51.50024, -0.12662
    #5
    you have to sit on the floor with a round cushion cross-legged holding a cup of 'erbal tea while incense is burning and let out a controlled, loud "hummmmmmm..." and concentrate on forgetting the "windows" way of doing things.
     
  6. siorai macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    #6
    I think that your first step in converting to Mac is to buy a black turtleneck shirt. Then go to your nearest Starbucks, order a venti no-fat, no-foam, double latte with a shot of vanilla, then proceed to sneer at anybody in the establishment not using a MacBook Pro to write their incredibly heart-wrenching poetry..


    :p


    Just dive right in. Pour over sites like this one and play around. Very quickly you'll find yourself in the position of being at a Windows machine and you're moving the mouse to the left side of the window to close it or wondering where the hell the "Command" button is on the keyboard.. It's amazing how quick that happens actually. :D
     
  7. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    51.50024, -0.12662
    #7
    scooterguitar i think your ":D:D:D" post was removed by a Mod as it contained no sentences. just a heads up.
     
  8. wilfried macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    #9
    I switched in November, and this was one of the first sites I came across:

    http://myfirstmac.com/

    It doesn't seem very well known, but for me it was quite helpful as a starting point, even before I got the Mac. I still check in once in a while.

    I've never bought a manual for anything before, but I got myself David Pogue's Mac OS X Leopard: <i>Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual,/i>, and I think it's well worth the $21 it costs at Amazon. It makes for a hand reference source; his systematic explanations makes life easier, and you get a better "big picture" of how Macs are supposed to work and how it all fits together (and one of the beautiful things about the Mac is that all the bits do seem to fit together to make a nice, elegant whole). And every time flip through it, I come across some tidbit I didn't know existed. Pogue likes to be chatty, which makes the book twice as heavy as it needs to be, but it makes for a much more pleasant read than your typical turgid technobabble.
     

Share This Page