Other ways to check computer besides Malwarebytes and Clamxav?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Yumid, Feb 4, 2017.

  1. Yumid macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    #1
    I ran Clam and Malware bytes without finding anything. The only problem is someone international keeps swiping my credit card info/tries accessing my online banking all the time...are there any other ways to scan your CPU that are a bit more in depth than malware bytes or clamxav? Free options?
     
  2. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #2
    Real security isn't free.
    How are these creeps getting your credit card info?
    You know they are trying to access your online banking account. How?
    They tried, but did not succeed? What stopped them?

    There really aren't legitimate security apps out there for the Mac. It's not a virus, since there are none. Malwarebytes is annoy-ware IMO. I don't need it, since my browsing habits have not created issues for me. To prevent what is happening to you, it's likely that you are going to need to change some habits.
     
  3. campyguy macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2014
    Location:
    Portland / Seattle
    #3
    Agreed with Gregg2, AFAIK no free software is available to fully assess what's going on with your situation. You could be the victim of a keylogger install, a man-in-the-middle compromise, a hijacked router, poor wifi, or easily broken passwords. The only Mac-based commercial security app that claims to include keystroke logger detection is MacScan by SecureMac. Personally, I use Little Snitch and a unique Standard User account for all of my financial dealings, and only with a wired connection.

    You didn't list which OS, web browser, whether or not you're using a VPN, or network connections you're using. That kind of info could be helpful, so we can help you…
     
  4. willmtaylor macrumors G3

    willmtaylor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    A Natural State
    #4
    My guess is that your computer isn't the culprit here.
     
  5. chscag macrumors 68020

    chscag

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #5
    I agree. I have had both my personal credit card and my business credit card information stolen several times. On one occasion it was used by some low life individuals operating out of Ireland. (I live in Texas) How did they get the info? Not from me or from my computer directly, but likely from my using the credit cards on line or in Walmart, Target, etc.
     
  6. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    #6
    Download and run EtreCheck (https://etrecheck.com/), then post the results of a Normal scan. It's not security software but instead produces a detailed system profile that includes all application components that are installed in directories of concern. One the Mac, there are relatively few places for nasty application to hide. The resulting report will clearly show nearly any significant threat installed on your Mac.
     
  7. Brawdy14 macrumors newbie

    Brawdy14

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Location:
    Devon, England
    #7
    The developer of EtreCheck has already displayed irritation when folk have challenged the validity of both EtreCheck and ClamXAV. When one downloads and installs such software onto an Apple machine an average user will have no idea what 'nasties' may also be installed surreptitiously.

    I'm hardly surprised that the OP did not comply with your instructions! ;)

    https://discussions.apple.com/message/33738761?ac_cid=tw123456#33738761
     
  8. BrianBaughn macrumors 603

    BrianBaughn

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Location:
    Baltimore, Maryland
    #8
    This webpage explains how to install and run "Rootkit Hunter" for the Mac, if you want to give that a shot.
     
  9. Brawdy14 macrumors newbie

    Brawdy14

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Location:
    Devon, England
    #9
    Thank you for posting that helpful information, Brian.

    I actually took an 'over-kill' approach and bought a brand new iMac! ;-)
     
  10. Brawdy14 macrumors newbie

    Brawdy14

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Location:
    Devon, England
    #10
    Brian,

    Once again, I thank you.

    On this rainy afternoon I thought I'd run a check anyway - just to see if I could!

    Here's the Rootkit Hunter summary:-

    System checks summary
    [17:08:13] =====================
    [17:08:13]
    [17:08:13] File properties checks...
    [17:08:13] Files checked: 94
    [17:08:13] Suspect files: 3
    [17:08:14]
    [17:08:14] Rootkit checks...
    [17:08:14] Rootkits checked : 385
    [17:08:14] Possible rootkits: 0
    [17:08:14]
    [17:08:14] Applications checks...
    [17:08:14] All checks skipped
    [17:08:14]
    [17:08:14] The system checks took: 5 minutes and 40 seconds
    [17:08:14]
    [17:08:14] Info: End date is Sun 26 Aug 2018 17:08:14 BST

    =

    What could I/should I do about the 'Suspect' files?
     
  11. BrianBaughn macrumors 603

    BrianBaughn

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Location:
    Baltimore, Maryland
    #11
    I tried to read up on those “suspect files” and, from what I’ve gathered, it is changes to macOS that causes the app to report those and there’s nothing to worry about.

    To me, “Possible rootkits:0” is the important part.
     
  12. Brawdy14 macrumors newbie

    Brawdy14

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Location:
    Devon, England
    #12

    That's good to know, Brian. :)

    Thanks.

    Whilst you're here ..... Do you have any experience of seeking and/or giving advice in the Apple Support Communities?

    .
     
  13. BrianBaughn macrumors 603

    BrianBaughn

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Location:
    Baltimore, Maryland
    #13
    I search there for information but don't really contribute.
     
  14. Brawdy14 macrumors newbie

    Brawdy14

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Location:
    Devon, England
    #14
    As that is the case, you'll have noticed that much use is made of a facility called 'EtreCheck' developed by a Mr John Daniels https://etresoft.com

    In your professional opinion, is EtreCheck 'safe' for use by the unwary folk who go to ASC to ask for help and advice?

    Thanks for your comments, btw. I'm glad that I don't have to pay $110 an hour to chat to you here! ;)
     
  15. chscag macrumors 68020

    chscag

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #15
    EtreCheck is safe to use. I believe they offer a number of free runs of the utility before having to purchase a license. Older versions of EtreCheck were freeware.
     
  16. Brawdy14 macrumors newbie

    Brawdy14

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Location:
    Devon, England
    #16
    Thank you for your opinion 'chscag'. I did note that BrianBaughn and Weaselboy agree with you. :)

    Perhaps you'd also like to provide your opinion of the current ClamXAV software? https://www.clamxav.com

    W
    ould YOU install it on your own Apple computer?

    If by so doing, you surreptitiously loaded malware onto your machine, just how would you know that you had done so?
     
  17. hobowankenobi macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2015
    Location:
    on the land line mr. smith.
    #17
    For anybody following along, a couple more free tools that have performed adequately for me: Sophos Home and Open AVG.

    Neither is perfect, but I consider them good (and useful) for free tools.

    My employer requires AV software and supplies Symantec Endpoint Protection. Been comparing Open AVG to a full enterprise SEP license on machines and file server shares that end up with malware/adware, and so far (surprisingly) Open AVG has identified everything SEP has and a few more; and seems to use less machine resources....and has had fewer false positives.
     

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