Overclocking G5


spunkgarLEWII

macrumors regular
Jun 1, 2013
100
0
Can't be done and never will be done. The G5's clock is what it is. Unless you can figure out how to micro solder, forget about it. If your G5 is slow, then just get a Quad or dual-core. They are the last of the fastest PowerPC Macs you can get.

If you don't need the power of the G5, then consider a G4 Mirror Drive Door but make sure you get one with a silent fan and power supply.

Is this possible through settings in osx?
 

Zotaccian

macrumors 6502a
Apr 25, 2012
637
2
Or get Intel -based Mac or PC. Those bring you more performance, per watt and total. They also offer better software support.

PowerPC machines should only be bought and kept if you have nostalgic reasons, you require PPC Mac for spesific software, you want to buy a Mac but cannot spend that much money for it, or the machine does what you want the way you want. I guess OP is not entirely satisfied with his machine.

G5 cannot be overclocked via software, it might be if you solder some resistors differently or something similar.
 

Zotaccian

macrumors 6502a
Apr 25, 2012
637
2
This has never happened. One guy few years ago claimed he did it, but never showed any proof.
Yeah I also haven't seen any actual proof of this, but if things worked the way they did in PC world the first iMac G5 17" models (for example) which had 1.6GHz and 1.8GHz processors probably had the same motherboard and the FSB was adjusted according what model it would become. If this was true, then maybe there was difference in the board somewhere, some resistors placed differently.

But then again, Apple's / IBM's design was different in many ways so it could be that the settings were simply locked in place somehow and couldn't be altered by anyone.
 

rabidz7

macrumors 65816
Jun 24, 2012
1,203
2
Ohio
Yeah I also haven't seen any actual proof of this, but if things worked the way they did in PC world the first iMac G5 17" models (for example) which had 1.6GHz and 1.8GHz processors probably had the same motherboard and the FSB was adjusted according what model it would become. If this was true, then maybe there was difference in the board somewhere, some resistors placed differently.

But then again, Apple's / IBM's design was different in many ways so it could be that the settings were simply locked in place somehow and couldn't be altered by anyone.
I bet if someone spent days and looking for the differences between the lobo on a 1.6 GHz iMac and a 1.8GHz, they would find the resistors. Every PPC cpu has them. Apple chose to not include the DIP switches.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,881
368
Inside
I bet if someone spent days and looking for the differences between the lobo on a 1.6 GHz iMac and a 1.8GHz, they would find the resistors. Every PPC cpu has them. Apple chose to not include the DIP switches.
Not every PowerPC Mac. There are no CPU speed resistors on the Powerbook G4 550Mhz/667Mhz models know as the gigabit Ethernet models, the Power Macintosh/Performa 6200, the TAM, or the Kanga Powerbook G3. There maybe other models as well. Then there are the non-Mac PowerPC CPUs like the Gekko and Broadway. Both of which lack jumpers or resistors to change the clock speed.
 

rabidz7

macrumors 65816
Jun 24, 2012
1,203
2
Ohio
Is this possible through settings in osx?
Yes.

But only the GPU, if it is ATI and pre X1xxx XX. Use ATIcelarator. If nVidia use graphiccelarator, or try to compile nVclock for OS X.

The processor is most likely overclockable, however no one knows the exact location of the micro resistors that control the multiplier. If someone did find them, it would only be modifiable through desoldering them, and them moving the resistors, or then jumping the two points with solder or pencil lead.

The FSB is most likely overclockable, however no one knows the exact location of the micro resistors that control the FSB. If someone did find them, it would only be modifiable through desoldering them, and them moving the resistors, or then jumping the two points with solder or pencil lead. Overclocking the FSB would also overclock the processor and RAM.

To overclock the RAM one would need to overclock the FSB.
 

spunkgarLEWII

macrumors regular
Jun 1, 2013
100
0
Since when did you start telling the truth? Maybe you didn't install Mountain Lion on your G5 desktop, right?

Yes.

But only the GPU, if it is ATI and pre X1xxx XX. Use ATIcelarator. If nVidia use graphiccelarator, or try to compile nVclock for OS X.

The processor is most likely overclockable, however no one knows the exact location of the micro resistors that control the multiplier. If someone did find them, it would only be modifiable through desoldering them, and them moving the resistors, or then jumping the two points with solder or pencil lead.

The FSB is most likely overclockable, however no one knows the exact location of the micro resistors that control the FSB. If someone did find them, it would only be modifiable through desoldering them, and them moving the resistors, or then jumping the two points with solder or pencil lead. Overclocking the FSB would also overclock the processor and RAM.

To overclock the RAM one would need to overclock the FSB.
 

ihuman:D

macrumors 6502a
Jul 11, 2012
925
0
Ireland
There is no knowledge so far that it can be done and I'd doubt if anyone would find any information about it this late in the game.
 

rabidz7

macrumors 65816
Jun 24, 2012
1,203
2
Ohio
Would that be a guy named: Rabidz7?
Yes it is,
G5 Overclock 2.0Ghz -> 2.2Ghz?
http://web.archive.org/web/20050215162051/http://24.13.230.40/overclock/g5.html

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There is no knowledge so far that it can be done and I'd doubt if anyone would find any information about it this late in the game.
I have beaten the iCrap game:
http://web.archive.org/web/20050215162051/http://24.13.230.40/overclock/g5.html

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Yeah I also haven't seen any actual proof of this, but if things worked the way they did in PC world the first iMac G5 17" models (for example) which had 1.6GHz and 1.8GHz processors probably had the same motherboard and the FSB was adjusted according what model it would become. If this was true, then maybe there was difference in the board somewhere, some resistors placed differently.

But then again, Apple's / IBM's design was different in many ways so it could be that the settings were simply locked in place somehow and couldn't be altered by anyone.
Here:
http://web.archive.org/web/20050215162051/http://24.13.230.40/overclock/g5.html
 

Goftrey

macrumors 68000
May 20, 2011
1,853
70
Wales, UK
This has never happened. One guy few years ago claimed he did it, but never showed any proof.
Would that be a guy named: Rabidz7?
sirhannik said:
The time has come. Its here. Well, not quite yet. The theory is here though. I'm just hesitant to pull more power out of my $4000 machine...

...I found what looks to be the way to overclock
Definition of the word 'proof': Evidence or argument establishing or helping to establish a fact or the truth of a statement.

Definition of the word 'theory': A supposition or a system of ideas intended to explain something.

Go figure.