Overheating MBP 2010

Chazz08

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 4, 2012
537
96
I have a 13in 2010 MBP. I guess technically it's not overheating, but it get's really hot and stays hot. I checked the temperature and it was 140 degrees. It started after I removed the Disk Drive and installed an SSD next to the HDD. I use the SSD as my main drive, so the HDD rarely spins. So it isn't that that's getting hot. I didn't think the SSD would get so hot. Could it? I'm not sure what to do to keep it from getting so hot.

One thing I've noticed is ever since I installed the SSD, it won't even cool down when I close it. The fans keep spinning and the computer stays hot. So something is running, but I don't know what. Anyone else have this problem? What did you do?
 
Last edited:

skofgar

macrumors newbie
Jun 18, 2013
14
2
Hi Chazz

I recommend you to take a look at the Activity Monitor (just type it in in spotlight)

  • Make sure you set it to show "All Processes"
  • order them by CPU (click on the column)

probably you will see the process which is heating up your mac (a blind guess would be, that it could be spotlight --> mdworker)


----

If it does not go to sleep you could check, using Terminal:

Code:
pmset -g assertions
if any process are listed, they could be preventing sleep.
If you need any help with that post us the result of this command or take a look at this: macworld-article


Hope this helps
 

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Doward

macrumors 6502a
Feb 21, 2013
526
8
This whole concept of some rogue thread causing your system to overheat is a fallacy.

Any system is designed to be able to cope with 100% CPU usage.

The MacBook Pro is designed to keep your system under 95C when under full load. If you are experiencing temperatures above 95C, you have a problem.

Unfortunately, stating a temperature of 140F is useless without knowing what load is on your system.

Run some heavy duty load on your system, and see what your temps are.
 

nickandre21

macrumors 6502a
Jun 21, 2012
539
1
This whole concept of some rogue thread causing your system to overheat is a fallacy.

Any system is designed to be able to cope with 100% CPU usage.

The MacBook Pro is designed to keep your system under 95C when under full load. If you are experiencing temperatures above 95C, you have a problem.

Unfortunately, stating a temperature of 140F is useless without knowing what load is on your system.

Run some heavy duty load on your system, and see what your temps are.

My cmbp stays under 99c :D But then again its because of fcp, logic pro, aperture and motion oh and flash videos otherwise sits nicely at 62c.

If there's any issue otherwise the macbook will shut down on thermal protection.
Some steps to ensure you macbook stays cool is to clan the vents at the back of the keyboard and if you are good with opening up then remove the fans clean them and use compressed air to clean the heatsink fins of dust.
 

makaveli559m

macrumors 6502
Apr 30, 2012
312
0
I have a 13in 2010 MBP. I guess technically it's not overheating, but it get's really hot and stays hot. I checked the temperature and it was 140 degrees. It started after I removed the Disk Drive and installed an SSD next to the HDD. I use the SSD as my main drive, so the HDD rarely spins. So it isn't that that's getting hot. I didn't think the SSD would get so hot. Could it? I'm not sure what to do to keep it from getting so hot.

One thing I've noticed is ever since I installed the SSD, it won't even cool down when I close it. The fans keep spinning and the computer stays hot. So something is running, but I don't know what. Anyone else have this problem? What did you do?
I switched back to Lion after having heat issues with Mountain Lion, even my battery life is higher in Lion than Mountain Lion was!
 

Chazz08

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 4, 2012
537
96
140° Fahrenheit I suppose? What app does tell you that? Have you tried MenuMeters or iStat Menus to read CPU and HDD or SSD temps?
If the CPU is at 140° F (which is around 60° Celsius (the other temp scale used on this planet, the logical one)), your computer is fine.

Those Macs in their heat - a sine of over-heating? - a short story by Mister GGJstudios

As to the not sleeping issue, check the Console for hints.

I used smcFanControl to check it out. The temperature it said when I was running a heavy duty program was 195 degrees, and yes, Fahrenheit. That's 90.5 Celsius. I'll try the other programs you listed to see if it can give me specifics as to what is getting hot, like you said. Thanks!

----------

This whole concept of some rogue thread causing your system to overheat is a fallacy.

Any system is designed to be able to cope with 100% CPU usage.

The MacBook Pro is designed to keep your system under 95C when under full load. If you are experiencing temperatures above 95C, you have a problem.

Unfortunately, stating a temperature of 140F is useless without knowing what load is on your system.

Run some heavy duty load on your system, and see what your temps are.
When I run heavy programs it goes up to about 90.5 Celsius. The problem is that it never cools back down unless I shut the computer down and let it sit. If I sit it on a table or something, the fans just keep spinning without anything cooling down. It only happens when it gets that hot though. If it's lower and the fans aren't going full speed, then it's able to cool down, which I find strange. I'm not to much concerned about the temperature as much as I am with it's inability to cool back down.

----------

My cmbp stays under 99c :D But then again its because of fcp, logic pro, aperture and motion oh and flash videos otherwise sits nicely at 62c.

If there's any issue otherwise the macbook will shut down on thermal protection.
Some steps to ensure you macbook stays cool is to clan the vents at the back of the keyboard and if you are good with opening up then remove the fans clean them and use compressed air to clean the heatsink fins of dust.
I'll look into doing this as well. I'll have to look around for compressed air. I'm currently living in Jordan, so hopefully I can find some. :)
 

Doward

macrumors 6502a
Feb 21, 2013
526
8
I think your problem is lack of airflow, not lack of heat transfer from the die ;)

Clogged Airways for $600, Alex.
 

Chazz08

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 4, 2012
537
96
I think your problem is lack of airflow, not lack of heat transfer from the die ;)

Clogged Airways for $600, Alex.
Well, I would like to think that too, because I'd know how to fix that. haha. But here's an update. I decided last night to close the laptop and put it upside down to make sure the vent in the back was opened up. It wasn't extremely hot at that point because I had just checked my email. When I woke up, there was no heat at all, but the fan was still going full speed......This is so weird to me!
 

Doward

macrumors 6502a
Feb 21, 2013
526
8
Well, I would like to think that too, because I'd know how to fix that. haha. But here's an update. I decided last night to close the laptop and put it upside down to make sure the vent in the back was opened up. It wasn't extremely hot at that point because I had just checked my email. When I woke up, there was no heat at all, but the fan was still going full speed......This is so weird to me!
Have you done an SMC reset yet?
 

Lolito

macrumors 6502
Mar 20, 2013
392
27
here
my advise:
- check for problematic apps, that might be the problem.
- clean your fans properly.
- install new thermal paste, although this must be not neccessary at all...
 

Chazz08

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 4, 2012
537
96
Have you done an SMC reset yet?
I have not, but I will look that up and do it soon. I noticed last night it didn't do the same thing.....It was after I had updated OS X 10.9 on the second hard drive. I don't know how that would cause the problem, and I don't want to rule that it's fixed because of one good night. I'll wait and see what happens again and report back after that and the SMC reset.