Paper suggestions

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Laird Knox, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. Laird Knox macrumors 68000

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    #1
    OK the Canon Pixma Pro 9000 Mk II was just too tempting to pass up at $180 shipped.

    So my question is, what type of paper are you using for your prints? Normally I send my print jobs out but this will give me another option for medium sized prints and proofs.

    Mostly I am printing photos and they tend to be landscapes, night shots or highly saturated colors.
     
  2. Artful Dodger, Dec 8, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2011

    Artful Dodger macrumors 68020

    Artful Dodger

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    #2
    Well for fine art I liked one type but they have discontinued it in 13x19, it was the Museum Etching paper. I also printed on the Photo Rag and that seems like it would be nice for B&W because it is a bit thicker of a paper than glossy but it can still be used by the top feed, the ME paper needs to be placed through the front feed only because it is really thick but awesome.

    I should list the papers I used, after re-reading this it would make more sense so here they are:
    1) Museum Etching
    2) Photo Rag
    3) Pearl Smooth
    4) HP's texture canvas paper
    5) Semi-Gloss
    6) Matte
    7) Glossy-Pro

    If you can get a sample pack that would help you decide for the larger prints. I did print (all the same piece of art fwiw) on Illford Pearl and that looked really nice with just the right amount of color, luster and so on. If your looking into being really daring, try http://www.dickblick.com/printmaking/papers/ as they have a nice selection of papers until your heart is content. I also printed one up on a semi-gloss and it looked good so I'm going to say if you think the weight isn't enough of the paper then go from there even though papers with tones will matter most, obviously.

    Try here http://www.hahnemuehle.com/site/en/169/home.html and then there might be cheaper suppliers out there that carry a good selection. On a side note, I have seen some of HP's papers that have a slight canvas like texture that a friend printed on the Canon just to see the quality and his look fantastic. It is like an expensive candy store to some degree but it's really nice to print big at home and have a ton of paper choices to very photos or artwork for the final viewing.

    If you have any issues trying to get the front tray open and working let me know via here or email with the heading 9000 front feed issues, the how-to is weak in the manual so just be gentle.

    If you want to see a sample of the Museum Etching I was given a few photos from the person I made this for so you can see to some degree the results. Just send me a pm with your email if you want. Good luck & happy printing :D
     
  3. Laird Knox thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #3
    Thank you for the extensive reply.

    So on your list are you referring to general types of paper or are those the types you use from Hahnemuhle? (Excluding the HP of course. ;)) My local printing has been limited to 8x10 Luster and Glossy so this will be a new adventure for me.

    I've also seen a lot of references to Ink Press papers. Do you have any thoughts on their products?
     
  4. snberk103, Dec 8, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2011

    snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #4
    Artful Dodger has lots of good advice, but the best bit that kinda got buried amongst the advice .... Get and use the sample packs. The reason there are so many good papers is that each photographer has a different idea about what will make our image stand out.

    Note: learn about paper profiles, how to get them, how to install them, when to use them. Learn when it is time to turn off colour management in your printer. The Adobe website has some very good tutorials - even if you aren't using Photoshop. I find many of the random "tutorials" on the 'net to be suspect, until you learn which sources to trust.

    Luck.
     
  5. Artful Dodger macrumors 68020

    Artful Dodger

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    #5
    Glad I could pass along some info for others.
    No, I bought two sample packs of the big stuff when I bought my printer so I could play around with one (1) sample pack from Canon not knowing Hahnemuhle made that pack for them until later on. The other was an Illford sample pack at the time, not sure if they still have it or not of the 13x19 stuff. I've used the Museum Etching (Canon sample pack) which I really like as it's similar to a thin piece of Bristol Board in weight/thickness and I like to print my line art with that and then use a Gouache to fill in my color, of course this isn't all printing however the ones I mentioned I did do a full print. Hope that answered your question and my leaving out a few things before :eek:

    I really wanted to see what the different brightness of the papers would produce for my first all digital painting. I should have stressed try getting a sample pack with different papers, Canon still sells the sample pack it's just in 8.5x11 now (good point reminder from snberk103 ). I found that Hahnemuhle was making the paper for Canon and when they, meaning Canon, discontinued the Museum Etching in the 13x19 size I ended up going to the Hahnemuhle site and was very pleased to find it was still being made, just not sold by Canon. As you can see they also have a nice range of other papers as well. I will be getting some of their other sample packs as I'm really interested in the broad range they can offer and learning which paper could enhance a photo or art work down the road. To be honest, that Bamboo Paper has my interest perked and I've been wondering how an old Hollywood type of photo would look using it…The Goya Canvas paper sounds like the HP paper my friend uses and the slight texture looks really good in 13x19.

    The rest of the list again I have printed using the same one piece of art work because like on the Hahnemuhle site, some papers will add a slight warm tone and others will be in the cool range, some will help define the color saturation while others seem to flatten a photo and it's nice to see just the paper altering the colors or perspective ever so slight and not PS, Illustrator or another program.

    Glad the profiles were brought up, I was told by a Canon rep. and at one time it is/was in the manual, you can print 14x22 using the front tray if you use the paper profiles from a few different vendors. This will override the limit or border Canon places on the full print "only" when using fine art paper such as Museum Etching, Photo Rag and one other. Something about the edges might, and I do mean ever so slightly "could" peal up from the print head on the thick wide stuff. The glossy, matte and the other papers will print a true boarder-less print no qualms asked. So my art piece ended up printing 11x17 on the 13x19 Museum Etching because of the boarder but that was fine for that piece, a different one maybe not.

    Also this is something I just did myself because ink is a cost with this printer over time, I cut up a sheet of paper into smaller sizes. I made some smaller sizes of the the Museum Etching just until I got the colors where I wanted them. If you were following a thread from me and the 9000 you would have read my own grief I had with a conflict somewhere/how with the drivers. I went from a 17" MBP running Snow Leopard to a new iMac with Lion and things went wack with my MBP. I had a super yellow cast over everything and because of that, I'm glad I used the smaller sizes first and not the 13x19 or I'd be chewing my own fingers at that point fwiw, laughs. It's all good now but it was a learning experience to say the least.

    I will be the first to say, ICC profiles and all I'm still not use to meaning until I got this printer I didn't care because I just gave a shop my file and went about my day. Not to mention I was a painting major, canvas meet brush meet paint, simple or so I thought, laughs. Now I pay attention or send off an email making sure I have the right ones and so on.

    I never checked out that site but I have heard great things about the water color paper they make because another friend has used it for Giclee prints with great results. Thanks for that link! :)
     
  6. Laird Knox thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #6
    Yes ICC profiles are going to be a new adventure for me. Like you I just sent the jobs off to the printers and let them sweat the details.

    I ordered some Epson paper just to have some general purpose paper on hand. The Ultra Premium Luster paper had some good reviews and they are offering 40% off on all paper with the coupon code FROSTY40. After I get comfortable with the setup I'll definitely be trying other papers.

    Snberk103, when you mention "colourbox management" are you referring to the setup in the print dialog box or something else? I know about letting Photoshop handle the color management but not sure if this is what you mean.
     
  7. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #7
    Ooops.... typo .... meant it to just be "Colour Management".

    If you now about Photoshop handling 'colour management', then you are fine. I find it useful to have a folder where I put all the little bits of documentation for using each paper. I'm using an Epson, so I don't know if Canon makes printing easier or not. However, the ICC profile names from each paper maker follow different naming conventions. I find it useful to have a list so that I can look at it and know that if I want to print to Ilford Galerie Gold Fibre Silk, then I chose the profile IGGFS13_EPR2400_PSPPn (because the profile name just makes so much sense! )

    I also put into the folder the printing instructions that tell me which Epson paper I tell the printer I'm using even if I'm using a non-Epson paper. At least for Epson printers (I don't want to assume anything for Canon), the ICC profile tells Photoshop how to tweak the colours for that particular paper. However, I still need to tell the printer about the paper - Glossy vs Matte, thick vs thin, etc - so that it knows how to physically work with the paper, and which black to use (my Epson changes a black ink depending on whether it's printing to glossy or matte paper). So, the last step in my printing process is to set the paper type based on the paper maker's recommendation.

    Hope this helps.

    If you are getting whacky colours, it's almost always because you forgot to turn off colour management in the printer. It's easy to forget to do when you're tired.

    Prints need some time to dry before you can fully evaluate them. They also look different hung on a wall vs flat on a table. I hang my prints on wall to evaluate - using magnets on a wall painted with a magnetic paint.

    Luck.
     
  8. Laird Knox thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #8
    Actually it does make some sense:

    IGGFS = Ilford Galerie Gold Fibre Silk
    13 = 13"? Do you have different profiles for different sizes?
    EPR = Epson printer
    2400 = printer model
    PS = Photoshop
    PPn = printer profile?

    Anyway, makes some sense to a programmer. :D hehe

    I forgot to turn off the printer management the other day. Turns out that the print actually came out better. I was trying to print out picture with some crazy blues and greens that wanted to go way out of gamut. (I'm still learning how to make a good print.) The printer pulled them back in line somewhat and the result was must less muddy than what I have been able to produce so far.

    [​IMG]

    It needs a lot of work but I was fighting a malfunctioning camera that night. :(

    Magnetic paint?! I have never heard of such a thing (at least strong enough to hold a print). Now I have have yet another thing to Google. :)
     
  9. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #9
    IGGFS13_EPR2400_PSPPn

    IGGFS13: = ILFORD Galerie Gold Fibre Silk (Sheets only)
    OR
    IGGFS13 = ILFORD Galerie Gold Fibre Silk (Rolls only)

    EPR2880: = Epson Stylus Photo R2880 - Actually, I'm using the Epson Stylus Pro 3800 - so my paper profile includes EPP3800 (note that it drops the R and substitutes a P. ??

    PSPP: = Premium Semigloss Photo Paper

    n: = No Colour Management

    This one is not so bad, but Hanemuelle (sp?) and Harmann, and Canson, each use their own coding ... so it's easy to decipher the name with the wrong "decoder ring". Some use M for 'matte', but at least one of them uses MK to denote 'matte' (as in Matte Black Ink), but at some point I'm sure I will find a profile that uses the "K" to mean something else I'm sure.

    How about

    PRO38EMP = Epson Ultra Premium Presentation Paper Matte
    or
    PRO38PQIJP_MK = Epson Presentation Paper Matte?

    Yikes!

    In the case of the Ilford paper, I also need to know what kind of Media Type I have tell the printer it is.
     
  10. Laird Knox thread starter macrumors 68000

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  11. Artful Dodger macrumors 68020

    Artful Dodger

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    #11
  12. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #12
    Wonderful, ain't it?

    To answer your question....

    Depends: The 1st question is, What is the intended print supposed to do?

    Along with my Hanhemuelles (sp?) Ilfords, Harmanns, Cansons (very nice paper!) I also have lots of cheap Staples and old 1/2 price Ilfords.

    The expensive paper is good for archival purposes, if you need the cachet of selling archival prints, and can bring out certain characteristics of an image. However, sometimes you just need a good looking cheap print. If it's going into an album, or it's small, or the client just wants a quick and fast photo session (for instance corporate head shots for the hallway) .... then the Staples paper works really well. And you won't have to charge as much for the print as for the photo shoot.

    I actually bought a whack of old Ilford paper on a 1/2 price sale on the theory that it should be at least as good as the Staples paper, but if anyone looks at the name imprinted on the back they won't see the name of a big-box office supply store, they'll see the a photographic name. It's about appearances. I haven't had a chance to fully test the paper yet, however.
     

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