Parallels - How big a partition do you make?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by zub3qin, Jun 15, 2007.

  1. zub3qin macrumors 65816

    zub3qin

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    #1
    I plan on installing Parallels as soon as I get my MB.
    On the XP side, I am only going to keep MS Office, Adobe Reader, some media players (VLC, WMP) and maybe a few other small programs.

    1) How big of a partition do you make for the Windows side?
    2) Do you make the partition in Boot Camp as well?
    3) If after a while you change your mind and need MORE room in the partition, is that impossible to do?
    4) If after a while you change your mind and need LESS room in the partition, is that possible?

    Thanks
     
  2. xUKHCx Administrator emeritus

    xUKHCx

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    #2
    I only use bootcamp/parallels for Office, Red alert 2, Fluent, and some other small applications

    1.) 8Gb - gives me about 1.5 Gb free space which i feel is ample headroom for the limited task i do in Bootcamp/parallels.
    2.) I only use bootcamp with parallels booting from it when i want to run it in a window
    3.) Yes i have done this exact thing with my bootcamp partition using a program called Winclone. Caveat, it may corrupt your bootcamp install if things go horribly wrong.
    4.) Yes i have done this exact thing with my bootcamp partition using a program called Winclone. Apart from the cavet above there is another in this case, you can't make it smaller than the amount of data actually on the drive. Say the partition is 16Gb but you are using only 7Gb you can resize with winclone so that the bootcamp partition is 7Gb but obviously it will be more like 8 or 9 allowing for some headroom.
     
  3. yetanotherdave macrumors 68000

    yetanotherdave

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    #3
    If you're just going to use parallels (and not use the same windows to boot in boot camp) parallels has a cool feature where the disk space you've allocated can grow as you need space. So I start with 3 gig and if I need more parallels increases the space needed for me, letting me have minimum disk space taken up with VM's.
    If you use boot camp you need a proper partition, you need to consider what you ae planning to do with your windows install to decide how big it should be.
     
  4. ~Shard~ macrumors P6

    ~Shard~

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    #4
    I believe Parallels can manage your disk space for you and grow it accordingly as necessary - might want to verify that though, I'm not 100% certain...

    Edit: Just beaten to it! At least I appear to be correct... ;)
     
  5. zub3qin thread starter macrumors 65816

    zub3qin

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    #5
    Is there any reason to use BootCamp and not Parallels then, since Parallels is more flexible? I do NO gaming, which I understood to be the only reason to run natively in BootCamp, no?
     
  6. ~Shard~ macrumors P6

    ~Shard~

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    #6
    Some people prefer not to have to share system resources by having OS X and Windows via Parallels running at the same time. For me though, I'm in the same boat, and choose Parallels over Boot Camp. I'm sure there are other reaosns out there as well...
     
  7. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #7
    Bootcamp allows your programs to run at "full speed" rather than competing with OSX programs. Other than that and gaming (getting to the graphics card) there is no reason.
     
  8. ~Shard~ macrumors P6

    ~Shard~

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    #8
    This is true - no matter how good Parallels, VMWare Fusion or any other virtualization software might be, there will always be a slight speed benefit with running programs natively as opposed to virtually.
     
  9. biturbomunkie macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    1) 8000mb or 7.81gb (1.67gb free)
    2) don't use bootcamp
    3&4) iirc parallels does allow you to resize the guest OS drive (at least for xp pro sp2)

    fwiw, i have win xp pro sp2 and some major apps that i installed are:

    AVG

    zone alarm

    chemoffice ultra

    office 2007

    HP navigation

    WMP 11

    sony ericsson update services

    sony ericsson pc suite

    winzip

    trillian

    firefox

    parallels tools
     
  10. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #10
    You never mentioned you intending to BUY parallels as soon as you get your MacBook :rolleyes:

    Anyway VMWare now has a promotion for their VMWare Fusion for Mac. Unity works much better than Coherence, and VMWare is a big name company with decades of experience behind them, so you might want to check them out.
     
  11. yetanotherdave macrumors 68000

    yetanotherdave

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    #11
    Yes, it will run full speed. Parallels is more flexible, but I'm finding that with the time lag to do anything I might as well have rebootedand done it at native speed. On my macbook running itunes, safari, and mail, and any OS in parallels (linux or XP) the whole thing runs like a peice of crap. The system becomes unresponsive and it takes ages to do something simple like drag a window, or select a tab in safari.
    When I replace my 80gig external bckup drive with a larger drive for backups I'll use the 80gig for my VM images and hopefully that should sort out most of the speed issues (not sharing a disk). Also I still need to upgrade to 2gig of RAM which should also sort things out a bit.
     
  12. zub3qin thread starter macrumors 65816

    zub3qin

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    #12
    Hey- I ordered Parallels with my Macbook. The only "bad thing" I am doing is installing XP with a disc Dell sent me with my old laptop. It was a XP replacement disc I never used as it was preinstalled on the laptop. Technically I only paid for XP once- but then again, the second disc Dell sent may have a different serial number....

    I'm ain't losing sleep over THAT!

    :)
     
  13. operator macrumors regular

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    #13
    I allotted 11 GB for my Windows partition. My "120" GB drive was really 111GB, so factored into my decision, and also 11GB was plenty for my needs. I only use WinXP to test websites in IE6 and IE7, and also to play Poker Stars (which is not available for Mac). Other than that I have no need for Windows. Currently I have about 7 GB free on that partition.
     
  14. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #14
    It would not work on your MacBook sadly. Dell has an OEM license with Microsoft which means the copies of Windows that Dell owns are only capable of running on Dell computers.
     
  15. Luigi239 macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    I doubt it will work if it is the dell branded CD, as I think it checks for dell hardware on startup.
     
  16. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #16
    Rather than going to all that trouble. Might as well just pop over to [website name removed] and get it over and done with.

    It is no different.
     
  17. brkirch macrumors regular

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    #17
    Unfortunately from my experience Unity doesn't work anywhere near as well as Coherence. Sure it's nice that Unity separates the windows so that they can be minimized and used with Exposé, but you can't really make use of programs that have taskbar icons and overlapping windows don't even display correctly in Exposé. I really wanted to give VMWare a chance, so I waited and waited for them to add the features of VMWare Workstation along with some other cool features, but it never happened. Fusion still doesn't have multiple snapshot support, and Parallels now does. Considering that VMWare Workstation has had that and many other features that Fusion still doesn't have for a while now, I see it as a sign that VMWare is not very much committed to the Mac platform. :( Think about it; if VMWare was really committed to developing for Mac OS X, they would have been able to come up with a product much more well featured than Parallels by now considering the resources available to them.

    That said, if I didn't already have Parallels and was considering whether to get Parallels or VMWare right now, it would be a tough choice. $40 for VMWare Fusion is a really good deal and being half the price of Parallels Desktop might just be enough to change my mind and make me go with Fusion. On the other hand, Parallels has said that they will add all of the features that VMWare Fusion currently has over Parallels (64-bit OS support, multiple processor support, Exposé support for Coherence) in updates to Parallels 3.0. So go with Parallels if you want more features, VMWare if you want better cost and support.

    Getting back on topic,
    1) 30 GB (the default) for Parallels, 15 GB for Boot Camp
    The size of the partition for Parallels doesn't really matter, as long as you make sure that it is big enough to store everything you want to put on it.
    2) I do, but you only need to do so if you want to be able to run Vista, play 3D games or have complete compatibility, otherwise the Parallels disk will be enough. If you want you can also do the reverse; have a Boot Camp partition that you can boot in Parallels but not a Parallels virtual disk, the disadvantage is that you can't suspend or make snapshots with a Boot Camp partition in Parallels.
    3) I'm not sure if this is possible with Parallels 3.0 virtual disks, which is why it is a good idea to make your virtual disk as big as you think you will ever need it to be, because virtual disks only take up as much space as the data they contain.
    4) You can run Parallels Compressor to compact your virtual disk, for example if you delete data and want to recover that disk space from the virtual disk.
     
  18. zub3qin thread starter macrumors 65816

    zub3qin

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    #18
    Let me ask this another way-
    With a 120Gb HD, how much is needed for the Mac side?
    If I want 15Gb on the windows side, does that leave enough?
    Can people tell me how much they use with their apps?
    I know with Windows what i need, and how much space is needed-- but I have no concept of OS and app sizes in mac.


    Thanks!
     
  19. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #19

    If you must know for me I only use 5gb for my Windows partition, and my Windows is a super slimmed down version made possible with Nlite.


    Edit: Oh and my VMWare virtual machine uses 64mb of ram. Beat that!
     
  20. HoosierInFL macrumors regular

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    #20
    I know that with Parallels or Vmware you can now drag and drop between Mac and Windows programs. How would that work if Parallels is using the boot camp partition and that partition is ntfs? If you want a partition bigger than 32gb, it has to be ntfs. Would I still be able to drag and drop between them? Normally, a Mac can read ntfs but not write to it.
     
  21. biturbomunkie macrumors 6502a

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    #21
    samba allows OS X to read and write on NTFS.
     
  22. HoosierInFL macrumors regular

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    #22
    Yes, but does Parallels allow it when you're dragging and dropping between Mac and Windows apps?
     
  23. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #23
    Yes. It does not matter because parallels and vmware has something that is running on the guest OS to faciliate that. Hence it is not OSX that is writing the file to the NTFS drive. It is "that something".
     
  24. brkirch macrumors regular

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    #24
    Most applications don't use up that much space, so 15GB will probably be enough. If you're talking about making a virtual disk though there is little reason not to allow for a little extra space (my 30GB Windows XP virtual disk takes up less than 2GB). I would just recommend going with the default virtual disk size if you're not sure how much space you need.

    Parallels will allow you to drag and drop, in fact it will even mount the Boot Camp partition read/write on the desktop so that you can use it directly in Mac OS X while the VM is running.

    The problem is, did you include virtualization daemon process or the networking daemon processes that VMWare has running even when it's not in use? When I did a VMWare and Parallels comparison on RAM usage, I found that VMWare actually uses more RAM because of all the daemon processes.
     
  25. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #25

    By the figure it was more of the ram that is allocated by one VM rather than inclusive of VMWare, I do run other virtual machines for other tasks, but that Windows lite VM was just specially for a single task :)

    My feeling on it is VMWare generally respects your system files more, while Parallels tend to play more hard and loose when it comes to security and various other stuff. As such I do tend to side towards VMWare for more of that secured feeling. The way Parallels is doing... making more half arsed featured in such a short period of time, who knows if it does not introduce any security holes into your Mac?

    Just look at the way they did Coherence, and now the way they did 3D. It seems like Parallels is more marketing driven than anything else. At least VMWare tried to do something right before they tout it.

    At least that is my feeling on it.
     

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