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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
55,026
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Parallels today introduced the Parallels Desktop Switch to a Mac Edition, bundling tutorial and migration tools with the company's Parallels Desktop 4.0 software that allows Macs to run Windows in a virtual environment, allowing users to switch between OS X and Windows without the rebooting required by Apple's Boot Camp solution. As the product name implies, the new edition is targeted at Windows users making the switch to Mac, and provides them with tools to easily move their Windows applications and data to their new Mac and offers them more than two hours of video tutorials to ease the transition to Mac."The growth in switching is partially due to the ease-of-use and cool capabilities of the Mac," said Serguei Beloussov, CEO of Parallels. "However, users don't want to lose the data they have accumulated and the applications they are already familiar with. Building on our proven track record of Mac innovation, we have addressed this concern and made learning the new operating system even simpler through interactive on-demand tutorials. These are combined with intelligent moving tools and our industry-leading Parallels Desktop for Mac, which offers the greatest performance and stability for running Windows seamlessly on Mac."Training materials include video, on-screen demonstration and written prompts developed from the perspective of a Windows user and are user-directed allowing users to focus on areas of most interest to them. Migration tools include a USB transfer cable and Parallels Transporter software that allows users to easily move their entire Windows system into the Parallels Desktop virtual machine on their Mac.

Parallels Desktop Switch to a Mac Edition is available today at a suggested retail price of $99.99.

Article Link: Parallels Introduces 'Switch to a Mac' Edition
 

mobi

macrumors 6502
Jul 26, 2004
407
15
Penn's Woods
Stopped using Parallels years ago, and haven't looked back. VMW Fusion has been rock solid for us doing mission critical work.
 

talkingfuture

macrumors 65816
Dec 4, 2008
1,216
0
The back of beyond.
Suppose it might be a good idea for those who need it. Personally I found it fairly easy to switch straight across without using Windows at all, don't think much will have changed in 3 years. I suppose other people may have more of a Windows legacy.
 

John.B

macrumors 601
Jan 15, 2008
4,158
671
Holocene Epoch
As I said on another forum...

The death knell for OS/2 was the day it could "seamlessly" run Windows programs, as there was no longer any reason for anyone to write OS/2 applications from that day forward.
 

windywoo

macrumors 6502a
May 24, 2009
536
0
Oh we don't want those filthy Windows users here! This is a local fan forum for local people!
 

CalMin

Contributor
Nov 8, 2007
894
721
As I said on another forum...

The death knell for OS/2 was the day it could "seamlessly" run Windows programs, as there was no longer any reason for anyone to write OS/2 applications from that day forward.

And if Apple built-in Windows support natively, that would happen. They don't, so it won't. Only a select few power users bother with virtualization.
 

Konstanty

macrumors member
Feb 7, 2008
48
0
Suppose it might be a good idea for those who need it. Personally I found it fairly easy to switch straight across without using Windows at all, don't think much will have changed in 3 years. I suppose other people may have more of a Windows legacy.

Same here. The GUI isn't really all that different between the two OSes. If it was really that hard to move from Windows to OS X, Apple wouldn't be making as much money as it is.

This seems like an answer in search of a problem to me.
 

yettimillan

macrumors regular
May 28, 2009
185
0
So does this mean that when im using bootcamp, I dont have to restart anymore, I can just go straight into either os?
 

Lershac

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2008
247
28
Baton Rouge, LA USA
so a little timely advice solicited here...

I use parallels on my mac pro to run a windows installation for quickbooks and a few other goodies (to access my notes in outlook/exchange). My problem is that over any serious length of time, the windows OS slows down to a crawl. Its a clean install with just those apps running, and get slower and slower, and there are some processes for Parallels that get bigger and BIGGER in memory footprint over time.

Does anyone else have similar experience, or a similar situation of a constantly running Windows VM on a diff VM software that does NOT have this problem? I would really throw any amount of money at this problem to fix it, but keep it on one machine.
 

MattG

macrumors 68040
May 27, 2003
3,824
325
Asheville, NC
I use parallels on my mac pro to run a windows installation for quickbooks and a few other goodies (to access my notes in outlook/exchange). My problem is that over any serious length of time, the windows OS slows down to a crawl. Its a clean install with just those apps running, and get slower and slower, and there are some processes for Parallels that get bigger and BIGGER in memory footprint over time.

Does anyone else have similar experience, or a similar situation of a constantly running Windows VM on a diff VM software that does NOT have this problem? I would really throw any amount of money at this problem to fix it, but keep it on one machine.

I noticed that in Parallels v3. v4 seems a lot more solid and faster.
 

ipedro

macrumors 603
Nov 30, 2004
5,583
6,868
Toronto, ON
I think many of you who've commented are missing the point: you can now move your entire PC environment, including Windows itself and all the settings you had -- essentially cloning it into a virtual drive on your Mac.

From there, you can say goodbye to your PC, use your Mac only from then on and slowly port everything over as you learn how to take advantage of your Mac and wean yourself off your PC.

That's quite a useful application for many average PC users thinking to switch but worried about the migration and having to quickly learn a new OS.
 

Scottsdale

Suspended
Sep 19, 2008
4,473
282
U.S.A.
The pricing here is the problem. With alternatives of a superior VM Ware option, and a free Virtual Box edition, it seems they should have used the extra videos as a competitive advantage to gain a higher percentage of the existing market. If they included the extras, and priced it similar to Fusion it may have taken a lead (furthered its lead) in market share. Buyers of these products are already "switchers." Using the tools to advance market share would definitely make the project more viable in the long run. At $99 few people will give it a chance.

I think the new features could have really benefited them more by using them as standard features rather than trying to make a little more money per sale. A higher rate of sales versus competitors would seem far more important to me from a strategic viewpoint. Seems like such a waste that very few will ever benefit from...

What the hell do I know!
 

Fastshutter

Guest
Aug 21, 2007
178
0
Instead of paying for the Apple Tax, a copy of Windows, and a copy of parrallels, why don't you just buy a Windows PC and be happier and richer?

:D
 

jaw04005

macrumors 601
Aug 19, 2003
4,380
47
AR
So does this mean that when im using bootcamp, I dont have to restart anymore, I can just go straight into either os?

No. I'm not sure why this is a front page story anyway.

Parallels 4 and Parallels Transporter are not new products. The only thing of interest here is Parallel's marketing desktop virtualization to switchers, and the only thing new about this entire bundle is that they're including basic Mac tutorials and the USB transfer cable for Transporter.

The bundle doesn't even include Windows, which is probably the most complicated part of the Parallels setup. Maybe it copies your version of Windows over from your old computer? However, it seems like that would be in violation of Microsoft's EULA (OEM copies are limited to a specific machine, virtualization can only be performed with certain copies of Windows, etc) unless you had as specific license agreement (Family Pack, etc).
 

ctucci

macrumors regular
Dec 16, 2008
159
30
Yer Mom's basement.
So does this mean that when im using bootcamp, I dont have to restart anymore, I can just go straight into either os?

Just the opposite, when you're using your mac normally under leopard, all you have to do is double click an icon, and another window opens up. In that window, you'll see XP, or Vista, or Linux, or whatever OS you've had Parallels or VMWare install.

Handy for schlubs like me who have to work with one foot in each world.
 

amac4me

macrumors 65816
Apr 26, 2005
1,303
0
Anything that helps and facilitates the Switch To A Mac gets my endorsement! :D
 

Lershac

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2008
247
28
Baton Rouge, LA USA
I noticed that in Parallels v3. v4 seems a lot more solid and faster.

I read something similar, and upgraded a while back. No joy, as I still have the problem. Additionally now when I put the VM to sleep, (to reboot the mac) the mapping of my docs to the mac equivalent goes away which SUCKS. All the other mappings go away as well. This really bites.
 

Scooterman1

macrumors 6502a
May 15, 2008
939
12
Houston, Tx
Instead of paying for the Apple Tax, a copy of Windows, and a copy of parrallels, why don't you just buy a Windows PC and be happier and richer?

:D

No kidding! I do wish they would come out with an equivalent App for the PC to run Mac. Just to play with the toy. I would need to make sure I like it before buying a Mac for that amount of money.

I know bashers, but my Core 2 Quad Core PC runs Vista just fine. And so many Apps available that you have to run Parallels or VMW to have the Apps available on a Mac. I'm not criticizing Apple, I just don't understand the devotion when you can't run much without running Windows, and it costs so much more.

O.K., I guess now's the time...... FLAME ON
 

polaris20

macrumors 68020
Jul 13, 2008
2,337
447
I think many of you who've commented are missing the point: you can now move your entire PC environment, including Windows itself and all the settings you had -- essentially cloning it into a virtual drive on your Mac.

From there, you can say goodbye to your PC, use your Mac only from then on and slowly port everything over as you learn how to take advantage of your Mac and wean yourself off your PC.

That's quite a useful application for many average PC users thinking to switch but worried about the migration and having to quickly learn a new OS.

VMWare Fusion is cheaper, and their converter app is free. I don't see the attraction here. The rest of the package is filler.
 
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