Parallels, VM ware, or bootcamp?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by nhcowboy1, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. nhcowboy1 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
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    NH
    #1
    I need access to Windows to run one program only. While I'm running it, I will also need access to the internet and (most importantly) I will need to be able to send files back and forth to the Mac side of the computer. Getting the files back and forth is the most important part of this. There's no point to having this program if I can't access the files that I download, and then upload them again once I'm done with them.

    Since I'll be running leopard, I'll have bootcamp built in - which, if it works for this, will save me the cost of having to buy one of the virtualization programs.

    But, this is it - just one stupid program that's not available for macs (yet). So, will I be able to get files back and forth easily using bootcamp . . . or do I need to pay extra and get parallels or vm ware?

    And I did look at the beginner's guide, so I understand that file transfer is harder using bootcamp . . . but what I don't know is how much harder.

    Thanks.
     
  2. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #2
    Boot Camp would require you to reboot into each OS. You could create a FAT32 partition and save the files there. OS X can read FAT32. The least expensive way to go, but a PITA.
    MacDrive is another solution. It makes file exchange between the two OS's easier, and doesn't require the FAT32 IIRC.

    For a single program, Boot Camp would likely get annoying quickly, so a VM would be the better bet if you are willing to spend on the software. No reboots! :D I tend to like VM Fusion, but search the forum, as there is a ton of info on it and Parallels as well.

    Hope this helps. :)
     
  3. The Flashing Fi macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    #3
    What program is this? If it's graphically intensive or is CPU intensive, or if it uses a ton of RAM, you'll want to use Boot Camp.
     
  4. Cantello macrumors member

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    #4
  5. nhcowboy1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5
    No, it's none of the above. It's a course management system that allows teachers to design and post course curricula for students, post homework assignments, review and grade completed assignments, etc. Although it has an online interface, you actually have to have their program loaded on your computer to do any of the tasks I listed.
     
  6. nhcowboy1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #6
    With regard to the solutions you have all posted, please clarify . . . Are there two issues here - creating a neutral partition from which both Windows and OSX can retrieve files, and getting Windows to understand the OSX-created files? Or am I overcomplicating this?

    If I just use bootcamp, how do I get files back and forth between the two? Do I have to save them to a thumbdrive or CD . . . or is that what the FAT32 partition is for?
     
  7. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

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    Dec 5, 2007
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    Yay Area, CA
    #7
    You are overcomplicating this. If you were to use boot camp, you can use these methods:

    - in Windows, use MacDrive to access your OSX Partition (Reading/Writing into it)
    - in OSX, use NTFS-3G to access your Windows Partiton (Writing into it)
    - create a 3rd partition for shared data, FAT32 format so both OS can read and write.

    Me, personally, I use offline files for Windows.
     
  8. SpookyLars macrumors 6502

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    Poland
    #8
    For one program, you can use VirtualBox - it's free and very stable.
     
  9. nhcowboy1 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #9
    Well, that's easy. And free. So why would anyone spend money on Parallels or VM Ware? :confused:
     
  10. iTronz macrumors member

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    Apr 24, 2008
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    United Kingdom
    #10
    Would go for Virtual Box if you don't want to spend any money on Virtualization software like VMware and Parallels. I personally use VMware as it has a lot of nice features like Auto Protect, 3D, Unity with dual screen support.
     
  11. Randor macrumors newbie

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    Feb 27, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    #11
    I like Fusion in Unity mode basically because your Windoze apps show up in your Leopard desktop as Mac apps. And you can drag and drop files between the two.

    I have a dedicated physical hard drive formatted in NTFS with Vista installed on it. I'm not sure if that makes any difference.
     
  12. Neil321 macrumors 68040

    Neil321

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    Britain, Avatar Created By Bartelby
    #12
    For the above reasons plus vmware been in the business along time so stability reliability & support plus it cannot run of a windows bootcamp partition
     
  13. Mr. Zarniwoop macrumors demi-god

    Mr. Zarniwoop

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    #13
  14. sgtbob macrumors regular

    sgtbob

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    Kansas
    #14
    Imac, Fusion and Ubuntu

    I have Fusion installed on my new iMac but when I try to install the Ubuntu OS via Fusion, there comes a point in the installation that wants to know if I want to format the HDD or at least a portion of it. I thought that these OS were installed as a virtual and did not require any of the HDD. Being a bit cautious, I did not continue with the installation. Is this a problem or by continuing what exactly occurs? Will the same thing occur with installing Windows XP(i.e., wanting to format a part of the HDD)?

    Bob:confused:
     
  15. iTronz macrumors member

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    Apr 24, 2008
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    United Kingdom
    #15
    All VM programs like VMware Fusion have to create a virtual hard drive, it is just a file which acts as a hard drive to the guest OS. VMware will not do anything to your physical hard drive.
     
  16. Randor macrumors newbie

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    Feb 27, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    #16
    I have Vista installed on its own physical hard drive formatted as NTFS. I can see all the files on this drive directly in OSX Finder without using either Boot Camp or Fusion.

    Of course I have to use either Boot Camp or Fusion to run Vista.

    This is great for backing up files because OSX can see the files individually and back them up. On a virtual hard drive I think OSX sees the drive as one huge file.

    Another bonus is that if/when Windoze crashes and burns on me, I can simply pull the physical drive out and set it on fire in my front yard!
     
  17. Trip.Tucker Guest

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    Mar 13, 2008
    #17
    As opposed to running it in a VM? How much overhead do you believe there is in a VM?
     
  18. ampdeck macrumors newbie

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    May 16, 2008
    #18
    Im using VMware Fusion and it works perfectly as it is. Been using Parallels but nothing compares VMware. its a fabulous application.
     

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