Partition Resizing

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by ZipZap, Aug 23, 2011.

  1. ZipZap macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    #1
    Looking for a good program to resize partitions without erasing them.
    Any suggestions?
     
  2. ZBoater macrumors G3

    ZBoater

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Location:
    Sunny Florida
    #2
    Unfortunately Camptune from Paragon Software doesn't support Lion, and their HFS driver software for Windows hosed up my PC so bad I had to restore from backup, so I am not sure I'd trust their software (not without a good backup anyway :D ).

    So I had to do it the old fashioned way and delete my Windows partition, delete it, recreate it, and reinstall. I am still looking for a "Partition Magic" for Mac. Acronis Disk Director doesn't work either.
     
  3. RobQuads macrumors regular

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    Jul 11, 2010
  4. KPOM macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #4
    This is where the old Winclone came in handy. Unfortunately, it doesn't work in Lion. If this is a Windows partition you are looking to resize, one solution is to back up and restore with a Windows backup program.
     
  5. ZBoater macrumors G3

    ZBoater

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Location:
    Sunny Florida
    #5
    If your partitions are only HFS, this would work.

    ----------

    I haven't had the courage to try that option. I backed up my Windows partition using the built in Windows backup program, but am not sure if a restore would work.
     
  6. ZipZap thread starter macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    #6
    I have 1 SSD presetly partitioned into 2. 0 Partition is the boot, 1 partition is storage.

    I want to decrease the boot (0) and increase the storage (1). Not sure what command or sequence of commands to use.

    There also seems to be no way to know if data is fragmented in the boot partition and thus would be lost by changing the boot partition size.

    Any thoughts?
     
  7. ZBoater macrumors G3

    ZBoater

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Location:
    Sunny Florida
    #7
    This link above seems to show a pretty detailed explanation of how the command works. Me, personally would not try it. I'd rather use software designed to do that. :D

    So why did you partition your drive to begin with? Just curious. I partitioned mine to run Windows on one partition.
     
  8. ZipZap thread starter macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    #8
    Not running windows. Second partition for media.
    You would think the article would show how...but it does not.

    Something like iPartition would do, but as I read the lion gotcha's was unsure if restriction 3 applied (not sure what filevault is):

    •
    iDefrag’s “Reboot and defragment” mode does not function with Lion (yet… we are working on this). As a result, to run an off-line defragmentation algorithm you will need to boot from a different partition or disk, or from a bootable DVD, which you can create by choosing the “Create Boot Disk…” option from the “iDefrag” menu.

    •
    iPartition will display the partition type for Core Storage partitions as 53746F72-6167-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC, which is the GUID (Globally Unique IDentifier) that Apple is using for Core Storage. This is expected behaviour, but we will be adding a name for this partition type in the next update.

    •
    iPartition is not able to format or non-destructively resize Core Storage (i.e. Lion FileVault) partitions. As far as we are presently aware, there is no documentation for either the Core Storage volume format, or for the associated library that ships with Mac OS X, and it is therefore unlikely that we will be able to support Core Storage in iPartition any time soon.
     
  9. jsolares macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Location:
    Land of eternal Spring
    #9
    You can't grow a partition "upwards", so you can decrease the size of (0) easily but you can't grow (1).

    You would need to backup everything in 1, delete de partition create a bigger one then copy back.

    You can do it all in disk utility.
     

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