Password protect RAR files in Mac OS X

Discussion in 'macOS' started by MacOSXProgram, Mar 12, 2010.

  1. MacOSXProgram macrumors newbie

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    Nov 24, 2009
    #1
    Anyone know how to password protect rar files in mac os x? which software should I use?
     
  2. uaecasher macrumors 65816

    uaecasher

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    #2
    Here is a video tutorial to do this, I'm using UnRarX in it.

    Password protecting a rar file
     
  3. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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  4. uaecasher macrumors 65816

    uaecasher

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    #4
    and free !
     
  5. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #5
    i love that about osx. there are so many devs that produce programs just for the fun of it, or to fix a problem that people might be having. think handbrake, adium, transmission, plex, insomniax and all of the other programs that are free! they are all the best of any software! yay for macs :D
     
  6. VoR macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    When I think of those programs (not knowing or using adium/insomniax) I think that they're all cross platform, working just as well (if not better?:) on windows/nix!
    Software choice is incredibly important when it comes to getting computers to do what you want, well - You certainly don't always 'get what you pay for' (such a wrong, irritating and old fashioned saying).
    This pretty pointless post was mainly because I read 'I love that about osx', when quality oss software is either cross platform or far more abundant on linux and windows :)

    Slightly more on topic, I use 7zip
     
  7. petsk macrumors 6502

    petsk

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    #7
    You can also create encrypted disk images with disk utility. I find that approch better, more secure and you don't have to type the password each time you open the archive if you let OSX save the password in the keychain. And you don't have to decompress the archive each time to look inside it either, just mount the disk image.

    The advantage of RAR-files is OS-independency and better compression, maybe :)
     
  8. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #8
    none of the programs i listed are for wind0ze, but some are for unix :)

    haha i get what you're saying. im not sure what it is about osx, but it just seems to have better applications. windows software developers are abundant, so functionality of the software isnt always so great. but on osx more people use it, and make recommendations etc.

    hadnt heard of that! hows it go?

    that is true, and tbh i prefer the encrypted disk images. much more secure then the crappy RAR file security :)

    the disk images are compressed too somewhat, maybe not as much as RAR files though.
     
  9. VoR macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    Handbrake and transmission are both cross platform, started on linux and run perfectly on windows? :)
    Plex is a fork of xbmc (elan didn't release source code or work well with their team, forked xbmc as plex and added a closed source addon engine) - again started on the original xbox, then ported to linux/windows/osx.


    Lots of rubbish/badly written/half finished projects on every platform - I wouldn't say that osx is any different, or that people don't use or recommend apps in 1000s of other online communities.


    It's a great compression algorithm, very 'well known' and supported (although like rar, it's still not as ubiquitous as a zip). Very similar feature set to rar, only it's open source (and faster and stronger).


    AES256 on 7zip :)
    For encrypted disks/file systems I'd use truecrypt.
     
  10. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #10
    wow. you're totally right! forgive me, i only just woke up!

    you wouldnt say it directly. but yea you would say that maybe the osx people are more passionate? or something like that

    interesting. i might give it a go :D

    oh! so about the same level of secure as disk utility :D governments can still crack it though :(
     
  11. J the Ninja macrumors 68000

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    #11
    No, they can't. They use it themselves, in fact.
     
  12. VoR macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    I dunno. I think possibly down to the smaller user/dev base that there's more people that want to make/take decent code and make it 'the' app for the task - which tends to be a focus on a decent/minimalist UI? Personally I don't think there's 'better' apps on osx, but like you said - it probably is easier to find one 'best' one for your task.

    Certainly no harm in trying :)
    For your own archives, I'd certainly recommend it over rar/zip. I guess zip is still the most user-friendly if you're sending files to other people (even if winzip etc will decompress)

    I don't know much (anything really) about disk utility, I'd be surprised if it matched truecrypt in anything other than the most simple functionality.
    Saying that, I was totally unaware (and not at all convinced) that anyone could crack a system such as truecrypt.
     
  13. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #14
    i know they cant. but they would have access to be able to crack them easily (by law). so in realty, even those disk images using AES arent safe. :(

    maybe because of the limited number of applications - that could be the reason why its so easy to find the software? ah well it doesnt bother me!

    the only time i use .zip is because im forced to when sending multiple files via email. and i only use RAR decompressors because most torrent sites force me too :p otherwise i use disk images. they just feel more comfortable.

    im learning about AES (and DES) in uni right now. its very scary what some people can do. you'd be surprised. nobody is safe tbh.
     
  14. VoR macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    You've got plausible deniability using a system like truecrypt.
    They can't really find a hidden disk/file system in the first place, and if they've got you clamped to a chair waving a pair of pliers in your face you could always give them a passphrase to an innocent hidden image.

    I know you can get massively parallel machines (off the shelf!) that can guess millions of random character passwords a seconds for relatively cheap, but I still think cracking AES etc itself is not at all feasible. I don't know how the law comes into it (I'm in the UK anyway - although we're probably worse!), any encryption algorithms have to be crackable?! :p

    I'm quite interested in what your uni course is telling you about AES etc. 'Nobody is safe' because all data/comms is monitored and there's often a super weak link in encryption - the user and their physical decryption method. I was under the impression that the encryption itself is pretty resilient.
     
  15. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #16
    i have thought about that scenario multiple times :p but its very easy to find hidden files on a computer. haha. and im weak minded :( i wouldnt last long.

    oh no definetely not! its NOT possible to crack AES currently (unless you get lucky). that isnt my point though...

    no no nothing like that. im sure that if the government (US govt of course :rolleyes:) had a good enough reason, they would force apple to reveal an "escape route" to cracking the AES encryption. im sure its possible.

    there are so so many things to consider! ask away if you have any further questions. im only in week 2 of this uni course but i have an in-depth knowledge of most things network (i am majoring in networking & security).

    for the most part, the transmission of data (using security/encryption/digital signatures) will ensure that the data is sent securely. as long as in AES encryption, DES will result in messages that are crackable (within minutes). as we know, anybody can capture data, but its the meaning of the data that is most important.
     
  16. VoR macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    I think that's the point with a system like truecrypt though. You can't see any hidden files. Even if you knew that there was hidden data on a drive, had it unlocked, there's no way of proving that what you've got access to is all that was there.
    It's a bit different if you're using a 'standard' encryption on a drive/partition like apples images/geom encryption etc - It's just encrypted data.

    I doubt apple built in a backdoor to their encryption. Surely government laws don't force them to do this? Surely someone would have known about this? Surely someone would have found and documented it pretty quickly? I have no idea, I would have thought it pretty pointless to implement if there's a simple way round it.


    Of course, the world is all about cash! - Everything is possible to crack, time taken over value gained, not a huge point in taking 20 years to crack some captured data if it's worthless after that time.
    I'm not a super spy and don't have or need to encrypt a load of data, so I'm not 100% on security. I'm interested on these 'law' comments though - I'd be very surprised (don't believe it at all) to find out that the government have to have access to and can crack everything.
     
  17. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #19
    ok, sorry i wasnt following completely before but im with you now! using truecrypt would pretty much guarantee you 100% security then :)

    can you use it for osx? as a boot drive?

    ive had a long hard think about it, and i reckon its possible for the govt to force them to do it. if there was some massive terror alert or something i reckon they would at least try to make them. ill ask my lecturer in a few days and get back to you on the real answer ;) its probably not possible though lol

    its not even crackable in 20 years, your currently looking at 149 trillion years to crack.. and thats only a 128-bit key.

    my logic behind the laws, is that if ANYBODY can create some files that take >149trillion years to break then some seriously important secrets can be stored there. like i said before, i dont think that the government (esp the stupid american one) would allow people access to that much power if they didnt have a way out. anyway, ill get back to you.
     

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