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iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
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Vaio from 2008 running Windows 11, thus getting more security updates, is more usable than any Mac from 2008. The PC my father built in 2003 is way more usable than a Mac from 2003.
What he says at the end is true. I'd rather have an upgradable Mac, Apple provide at least 5 years of security updates to each OS than a "faster" RAM and SSD.
Lately I've been thinking moving back to PC and Android in the future. I don't know. Apple has lost its charm and especially with iOS 18, considering my Huawei from 2011 was able to do the same things as iOS 18 when it comes to customisation. It even had a dark theme.
I don't know. Lately I feel like Apple products are not worth it anymore. Especially since new iPhones are one year behind of Pro models. Apple is behaving like Samsung lately. The same goes for Macs. I've just lost it. I remember back in 2007-18 I used to love Apple so much and the Keynotes etc, but now I've looked around and realised that PCs are better than Macs and more secure. The pricing is better as well.Nothing still beats the iPad though.
 

MarkC426

macrumors 68040
May 14, 2008
3,625
2,053
UK
Just googled a typical spec (intel Centrino with max 4gb ram).
I doubt that could seriously run Windows 11 comfortably.

My cMP is now 14 years old and still runs the same software as my current Mac Studio (3rd party non-Apple apps).
The latest OS isn’t always the best, as can be seen with Sonoma.

Apart from Ram (and maybe storage on some machines), Mac’s have not been upgradeable for a long time, except the Mac Pro.
 

iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
1,946
Just googled a typical spec (intel Centrino with max 4gb ram).
I doubt that could seriously run Windows 11 comfortably.

My cMP is now 14 years old and still runs the same software as my current Mac Studio (3rd party non-Apple apps).
The latest OS isn’t always the best, as can be seen with Sonoma.

Apart from Ram (and maybe storage on some machines), Mac’s have not been upgradeable for a long time, except the Mac Pro.
I agree. Lion wasn't comfortable to use on my MacBook 4,1, High Sierra wasn't comfortable to use on my MacBook Pro 7,1 but both of them don't receive security updates anymore and both of those laptops run Windows 10 better than the latest version of macOS.

If Apple would care for the environment they'd let you upgrade and provide security updates for longer. IMO High Sierra should still receive security updates for example.
 

elvisimprsntr

macrumors 65816
Jul 17, 2013
1,035
1,544
Florida
It’s a personal choice.

Teenagers who don’t appreciate the value, and either abuse or loose them get low end Windows PCs. PCs have no residual value at the end of their useful life.

Adults who don’t abuse and keep their devices longer can opt to buy a Mac which will have a higher residual value when they upgrade.

I bought an Acer Aspire as an OBDII diagnostic laptop. Most if not all OBDII apps run on Windows.
 
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iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
1,946
It’s a personal choice.

Teenagers who don’t appreciate the value, and either abuse or loose them get low end Windows PCs. PCs have no residual value at the end of their useful life.

Adults who don’t abuse and keep their devices longer can opt to buy a Mac which will have a higher residual value when they upgrade.

I bought an Acer Aspire as an OBDII diagnostic laptop. Most if not all OBDII apps run on Windows.
None of what you said makes no sense whatsoever.
Macs don't have any value either. I see cheap MacBooks all the time. Especially intel ones.
 

splifingate

macrumors 65832
Nov 27, 2013
1,504
1,322
ATL
Urhm, I have both sides of the Coin running, and they all seem to operate.

You're certainly diving-into Hyperbole Territory, iHH, with such an inflammatory psot 🤷‍♂️

Step-back, for a minute, and appreciate the naivete in such things :)

There are folks here, that have been running hardware/software longer than you've been alive!

Have a great day!
 

Rastafabi

macrumors 6502
Mar 12, 2013
343
193
Europe
Well I think the opening Post is pretty misleading. While old PCs depending on their configuration can be made to run Windows 11 it's neither endorsed, nor supported (8th Gen or newer Intel CPUs and newer as well as TPM2 required). In that regard it's not to different from macOS which almost supports all 2018 and newer Macs, which just coincides with 8th generation Intel CPUs. While the TPM2 enabled secure boot chain on the Mac side is realised via the T2 chip, which among secure boot has other benefits as well. And even considering, that these restrictions can be circumvented on windows 11, you shouldn't forgetting, that the same is true for macOS (OCLP and similar) as well.

However what Macs' longevity is about is, Software support as well as resale value and overall reliability. Even new Mac software (apart from games) usually support some macOS release prior the current one, so there is mostly relatively little friction regarding software support. This is mostly also comparable to windows of course. Macs resale value shouldn't be underestimated as even 10 year old machines still fetch at least 10% of their original value, and additionally almost any repair part still can be found. Also even low tier Macs from almost any era represent many times mid to high tier CPU components (mostly i5 or better CPUs) and other components such as screens and chassis where usually above average for their time. Not to mentions their build quality. All of this results into their reliability.

In our family just last year we took my old 13" 2012 MacBook Pro out of service, though anecdotally not because it stopped working (still lasted around 1,5h with its original battery), but because of a finance tool running in bootcamp, windows which refused to work on this old machine. Privately it was used on macOS. It ended up being replaced with a 2018 Mac mini (i5), which after selling this old MacBook just cost around 80€ more.

So while the MacBook was already slow (and the SSD upgrade it received sometime during its lifespan, it was fine for the weekly use it experienced, which was mostly writing and printing letters, sending emails, sorting and managing photos, doing some light browsing like online banking and making video calls. The finance software was mostly run in a Windows VM till its update didn't even let it run in BootCamp.

As I'm the go2 IT-guy in my family I also manage some windows machines. And in my experience even an 2015 i3 notebook is borderline unusable after at most half a year of usage after a clean install. Already moved some people over to linux which works far better on this old hardware. (I found ZorinOS to be the best "no fuzz" and tinker free distro for Windows people as it's visually basically a drop in replacement and being based on ubuntu mostly just works).

---

@iHorseHead: Regarding your references to 2017 era Macs: While you apparently have good memories at least the Apple laptops were objectively the worst model lines they had in a long while. Bad keyboards. Lots of overheating/throttling issues. Current Macs are insanely powerful and well specced for the price - just this summer there finally appears to be some competition and catching up in progress, though within the next three months updates are due.
Regarding your remarks regarding security: I wonder what makes you think that Windows is more secure? They are mostly not because they can't be. Will Windows Defender is usually quick and you don't have to much issues with security if you act cautiously if you infect your PC basically anything can happen. That's not true for Macs as the OS cannot be altered unless explicitly allowed. This cannot be done from within the OS. Also currently not even UEFI Secure Boot can guaranty boot and hardware security as it's fundamentally broken, while on the Mac side there aren't any known exploits whatsoever.
And last I want to refer to your iPhone comments. While "ordinary" iPhones for the last few years were a generation behind in terms of CPUs compared to the Pro Models this is almost certain to change this years. Also those "old" CPUs mostly run circles around even the lastest CPUs the Android world has to offer. Maybe not always in multicore performance, though hardly any mobile software uses more than two cores at once so any number of additional cores should be plenty on a phone.
And I don't really get why you complain about new iOS18 features, even though they have been available for android years earlier. Just feel happy you get them? Also regarding AI features it's not even comparable, especially if you value privacy. If you consider privacy as being a part of security, which is a argument which can well be made, neither Windows nor Android come even close.

In the end all comes together as a choice of preference, but I don't think the points you mentioned are valid to draw your conclusions.
 
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iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
1,946
Well I think the opening Post is pretty misleading. While old PCs depending on their configuration can be made to run Windows 11 it's neither endorsed, nor supported (8th Gen or newer Intel CPUs and newer as well as TPM2 required). In that regard it's not to different from macOS which almost supports all 2018 and newer Macs, which just coincides with 8th generation Intel CPUs. While the TPM2 enabled secure boot chain on the Mac side is realised via the T2 chip, which among secure boot has other benefits as well. And even considering, that these restrictions can be circumvented on windows 11, you shouldn't forgetting, that the same is true for macOS (OCLP and similar) as well.

However what Macs' longevity is about is, Software support as well as resale value and overall reliability. Even new Mac software (apart from games) usually support some macOS release prior the current one, so there is mostly relatively little friction regarding software support. This is mostly also comparable to windows of course. Macs resale value shouldn't be underestimated as even 10 year old machines still fetch at least 10% of their original value, and additionally almost any repair part still can be found. Also even low tier Macs from almost any era represent many times mid to high tier CPU components (mostly i5 or better CPUs) and other components such as screens and chassis where usually above average for their time. Not to mentions their build quality. All of this results into their reliability.

In our family just last year we took my old 13" 2012 MacBook Pro out of service, though anecdotally not because it stopped working (still lasted around 1,5h with its original battery), but because of a finance tool running in bootcamp, windows which refused to work on this old machine. Privately it was used on macOS. It ended up being replaced with a 2018 Mac mini (i5), which after selling this old MacBook just cost around 80€ more.

So while the MacBook was already slow (and the SSD upgrade it received sometime during its lifespan, it was fine for the weekly use it experienced, which was mostly writing and printing letters, sending emails, sorting and managing photos, doing some light browsing like online banking and making video calls. The finance software was mostly run in a Windows VM till its update didn't even let it run in BootCamp.

As I'm the go2 IT-guy in my family I also manage some windows machines. And in my experience even an 2015 i3 notebook is borderline unusable after at most half a year of usage after a clean install. Already moved some people over to linux which works far better on this old hardware. (I found ZorinOS to be the best "no fuzz" and tinker free distro for Windows people as it's visually basically a drop in replacement and being based on ubuntu mostly just works).

---

@iHorseHead: Regarding your references to 2017 era Macs: While you apparently have good memories at least the Apple laptops were objectively the worst model lines they had in a long while. Bad keyboards. Lots of overheating/throttling issues. Current Macs are insanely powerful and well specced for the price - just this summer there finally appears to be some competition and catching up in progress, though within the next three months updates are due.
Regarding your remarks regarding security: I wonder what makes you think that Windows is more secure? They are mostly not because they can't be. Will Windows Defender is usually quick and you don't have to much issues with security if you act cautiously if you infect your PC basically anything can happen. That's not true for Macs as the OS cannot be altered unless explicitly allowed. This cannot be done from within the OS. Also currently not even UEFI Secure Boot can guaranty boot and hardware security as it's fundamentally broken, while on the Mac side there aren't any known exploits whatsoever.
And last I want to refer to your iPhone comments. While "ordinary" iPhones for the last few years were a generation behind in terms of CPUs compared to the Pro Models this is almost certain to change this years. Also those "old" CPUs mostly run circles around even the lastest CPUs the Android world has to offer. Maybe not always in multicore performance, though hardly any mobile software uses more than two cores at once so any number of additional cores should be plenty on a phone.
And I don't really get why you complain about new iOS18 features, even though they have been available for android years earlier. Just feel happy you get them? Also regarding AI features it's not even comparable, especially if you value privacy. If you consider privacy as being a part of security, which is a argument which can well be made, neither Windows nor Android come even close.

In the end all comes together as a choice of preference, but I don't think the points you mentioned are valid to draw your conclusions.
Hello,
I've been using Macs for over 10 years now and based on my experiences PCs tend to be supported for longer, thus this is what makes a PC more secure, because they receive updates for longer. You could've easily stretched out Windows XP machine to Windows 7, but you can't do the same with a Mac.
Microsoft tends to act faster when there are issues with the security, Apple not so much. There have been several security issues with macOS and Apple has taken it's time to fix things.
There are many PCs out there that are cheaper and more powerful than Macs and you get way more for the money. Mac is more "secure", because it's not targeted that much since most of the world uses Windows and Microsoft tends to support Windows for way longer than Apple does. In the fall MacBooks from 2015 will be insecure. I'd say software is better supported on Windows and for longer. I also work in IT and barely any companies use a Mac. We manage over 10000 Windows machines and servers. Windows is way better targeted for businesses, has much better software support and runs software that Macs don't. Mac just got Maya quite recently and it still runs better on Windows. Although the situation has gotten better. Macs are also harder to manage and provide technical support to (Looking at you, Addigy) and everything just requires extra steps. Nable, Kaseya all work better on Windows and Windows workstations are a lot easier to manage.

Based on my experiences Macs haven't been really reliable. Software and hardware wise. I've never had any other PC randomly crack on me as White MacBooks before 2010. macOS has had many issues with WiFi suddenly dropping and not being able to connect to it again without restarting and when I got my M1 MacBook it used to crash on me all the time on Big Sur. Even by sitting on the desktop it randomly crashed, but the issue has been fixed ever since Monterey and 2008 MacBook Pros and many other Macs have been just horrible. Louis Rossman has pointed out all of those things and lets not forget that Apple's displays are the only ones that break from the literal dust.
MacBook Pro Models Are Susceptible To ‘Dust Door’; Dirt Can Accumulate Inside And Damage The Flexible Display Cables and there are so many issues with Macs that I could point out that most of the PC manufactures don't have.
I wouldn't dare to say that Macs have excellent build quality + considering that many of the defects aren't even covered by Apple's warranty.

My remarks about the security, once again was Microsoft providing security updates for longer. Ironic that Windows XP is more usable and more secure than Mac OS X Tiger for example.

The same goes out for Macs these days:
Mac easiest to hack, says $10,000 winner
Hidden VNC tool gives attackers full access to Macs; comes with $100K guarantee - I can find you more articles, but Apple has left older Macs vulnerable to such attacks, while Microsoft supports computers for a longer period of time. I'd say using a Mac from 2010 is way more secure on Windows 10 than on OS X High Sierra.

The iPhone comment was for the users that claimed that Android's customisation is for children and they don't need that and now all the sudden everybody's excited about the upcoming customisation features on iOS 18, which is irony at it's best.

And the iPhone used to be great, because no matter what newest iPhone you buy you get the newest and the most powerful processor. What Apple is doing now is what Android manufactures do, which is very disappointing in my opinion.

Apple's operating systems aren't open source and we don't really know how private they are and I'm a firm believer that cloud is someone else's computer. Apple didn't invent it's own AI, but uses ChatGTP + Google Gemini and I won't be getting any of these features anyway, since I'm in the EU.

Many PCs and Android phones look more appealing to me than Apple devices these days, especially if Google or Samsung will keep their promises about providing software support for phones for years to come.

I think it's unfair to compare some cheap i3 notebook to an expensive MacBook. Most PCs run fine.
While I agree with Austin's points, he's correct about the usability. You could put Windows 10 on a 2006 laptop and get an up to date laptop while Mac was stuck on Snow Leopard.
Interestingly enough, I had to upgrade my old Dell laptop from Windows 7, because doing clean install of Windows 10 wasn't possible. It claimed that it's not supported.

And the video I posted before made me realise that the PCs are generally a better value for longevity. They were using Windows 11 on 2008 laptop, while Macs from 2008 are out of date. Most of them don't even render websites on Lion anymore and that's my point: It wouldn't hurt a trillion dollar company to support their software a little longer with security updates at least. Why not provide macOS security updates for 5 years for example? It would've been awesome if High Sierra would've been supported till 2023, making it more secure. Apple just drops support too fast in my opinion. I also believe that using Windows 10 is safer than OS X High Sierra as of today, but personally I haven't had any issues whether we're talking about a Mac or Windows. The last time I got a virus was from Limewire and I learned my lesson the hard way :)
macOS Under Attack: Examining the Growing Threat and User Perspectives

Personally, I don't use my Mac on an admin account nor do I do so on Windows and I'm extremely careful with what I do online nor don't really surf on random sites nor download anything, really. I chose a MacBook because of Xcode and that's pretty much all I've got on my MacBook.

Thank you for the points you brought up, but I still disagree with you on many aspects.
 

Siliconguy

macrumors 6502
Jan 1, 2022
315
458
If Apple would care for the environment they'd let you upgrade and provide security updates for longer. IMO High Sierra should still receive security updates for example.
It would be nice if Apple had a Long Term Support release at intervals. High Sierra would have been one good place to have one. The last OS that worked without Metal, APFS was finally debugged, etc.

Or they could have stopped at Mohave if they had written a Metal driver for the Radeon 5770 video cards that were stock in the 2009 to 2012 Mac Pros, but no. Apple is a hardware company, they have no interest in keeping older machines running. The 2010 Mac Pro with a Metal video card (which cost more than the Pro) runs Monterey with ease right up until a program wants an AVX instruction.

I have a current Linux distribution on a 2009 Mac mini. The hardware works fine and lasts a long time. The Xfce desktop is quite usable on that Mini. Apple's OS just gets abandoned early.
 

SpotOnT

macrumors 6502a
Dec 7, 2016
924
1,950
Hold up. Windows 11 officially requires an 8th gen Core Intel…which was released in like 2017/2018….

So if you are running Windows 11 on a 2008 machine, you are using a hack….

If you are counting hacks, you can run MacOS Sonoma on a 2007 iMac!

You are not making a fair comparison here. You can’t compare a hacked PC to an unhacked Mac. You have to compare hacked to hacked or unhacked to unhacked.

Maybe you should look into OpenCore Legacy Patcher?
 

Allen_Wentz

Suspended
Dec 3, 2016
2,898
3,161
USA
Vaio from 2008 running Windows 11, thus getting more security updates, is more usable than any Mac from 2008. The PC my father built in 2003 is way more usable than a Mac from 2003.
What he says at the end is true. I'd rather have an upgradable Mac, Apple provide at least 5 years of security updates to each OS than a "faster" RAM and SSD.
Lately I've been thinking moving back to PC and Android in the future. I don't know. Apple has lost its charm and especially with iOS 18, considering my Huawei from 2011 was able to do the same things as iOS 18 when it comes to customisation. It even had a dark theme.
I don't know. Lately I feel like Apple products are not worth it anymore. Especially since new iPhones are one year behind of Pro models. Apple is behaving like Samsung lately. The same goes for Macs. I've just lost it. I remember back in 2007-18 I used to love Apple so much and the Keynotes etc, but now I've looked around and realised that PCs are better than Macs and more secure. The pricing is better as well.Nothing still beats the iPad though.
Is this a troll post? Obviously YMMV, enjoy your 2008 Vaio that fully spec'd IIRC cost quite a lot. And even the 2011 Vaio that cost more than the MBP could not cope as a full-on desktop replacement like the 2011 Thunderbolt MBPs.

But that was then. Today's MBPs rock even more. Y'all can keep Windows thank you.
 

v0lume4

macrumors 68020
Jul 28, 2012
2,488
5,167
My favorite personal anecdote is a recent experience where I needed to run some software on my 2010 MacBook Pro, but couldn’t because my OS was out of date.

On that very same computer, I booted into my Windows 7 Boot Camp partition and installed the software I needed with zero hiccups. Again: same computer.

If that doesn’t say something about Windows versus MacBook software support, I don’t know what does.
 

Nekomichi

macrumors 6502
Sep 20, 2016
283
430
IMG_0229.jpeg

Then there's me running Photoshop on a 2002 PowerBook G4 with 512MB of RAM. It really depends on the person and their individual use cases, some people can stretch their hardware for years while others need more frequent refreshes. Everyone's definition of a "usable" computer is different.

Windows 11 support on 2008 machines isn't official and was achieved using community patches, and macOS has similar community patches too.
 

Manzanito

macrumors 65816
Apr 9, 2010
1,120
1,818
I don’t know, maybe? It’s not a black or white thing. I have a cMP from 2010, runs great. Not the best example, I put a couple of ssd’s, upgraded the ram and switched the gfx twice. But still, runs great.

I also happen to have a 2010 windows laptop that runs awfully slow. Intel i7, dedicated nvidia card, so it was no cheap model. I don’t even use it anymore, I got a license of parallels for the few times when I need to use ms access and thankfully I don’t have to endure the painful experience of booting up the thing.

I don’t think I’ll have such a good lifespan with any current mac, though.
 
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LevorgPenmancho

macrumors member
Nov 8, 2022
46
91
Unless anyone has and hard data on this, the replies will just be filled with personal anecdotes. And given we’re on an Apple forum, perhaps these will be skewed positively for Apple.

That said, I’m Mac-leaning BECAUSE of the unreliability of my PCs, which eventually led me to Mac.

First PC laptop motherboard catastrophically failed after 2 years. Second was a netbook, and, well it didn’t take long before that couldn’t run basic programs sufficiently. So I bought a desktop to use for more intensive tasks. This was good!
Eventually when I had the need for a laptop again, I got a MacBook Air. 10 years later, I still have that and use it regularly. I replaced the battery and that’s it.
As for the desktop PC, I still kinda have it. Although I’ve replaced everything other than the case.
 

iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
1,946
Windows 11 "hack" is semi-official as it was published on a Microsoft website with an appropriate disclaimer...
Yet when you post about OpenLegacyCore patcher on Apple Discussions it gets deleted, but Microsoft doesn't delete such answer when told how to edit regedit.
Also, in some cases you can't clean install Windows 11 but you can upgrade from 10 with no issues. If you clean install then you get a message that it's unsupported.
 

iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
1,946
View attachment 2394762
Then there's me running Photoshop on a 2002 PowerBook G4 with 512MB of RAM. It really depends on the person and their individual use cases, some people can stretch their hardware for years while others need more frequent refreshes. Everyone's definition of a "usable" computer is different.

Windows 11 support on 2008 machines isn't official and was achieved using community patches, and macOS has similar community patches too.
Yes, but it no longer receives security updates. Also, if you post about CoreLegacyPatcher on Apple Discussion's it gets deleted, but if you post about how to regedit Windows registry to run Windows 11 it won't get deleted. In many cases you can upgrade from Windows 10 without any issues. You just can't clean install W11 because then you get a message that it's unsupported.
Also, PCs from 2002 do work. So? We had a PC from the 90's that also worked and powered on and everything and the last I remember it worked but my mom gave it away. Still, the last I remember it worked.

Now show me how you surf the web on this 2002 PB G4.
 

iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
1,946
It would be nice if Apple had a Long Term Support release at intervals. High Sierra would have been one good place to have one. The last OS that worked without Metal, APFS was finally debugged, etc.
That is the whole point of my post, to be fair. Just look at people on Apple Discussions. You can't even mention OpenCoreLegacy patcher, but people rather tell to buy new Macs and now that MacBook Air 2020 is the last supported OS on the next release we're getting awfully close to support being dropped on that as well. I don't see how most Linux distros can provide security support up to six years or LTS releases yet Apple wasn't able to support Lion and High Sierra or El Capitan for a few years more.
 
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iHorseHead

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 1, 2021
1,532
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I also happen to have a 2010 windows laptop that runs awfully slow. Intel i7, dedicated nvidia card,
Did you change the thermal paste? what are the CPU levels like? Is it overheating? I had a 2010 MacBook that was just awfully slow till I replaced the thermal paste and cleaned and reinstalled the OS and the same goes for PCs tbh. There are also other factors though.
 

h.gilbert

macrumors 6502a
Nov 17, 2022
680
1,165
Bordeaux
For me macs are the only Apple products that are worth it. When M1 came out the Air actually seemed better value than all the windows alternatives. Even now a used M1/2 would be better value than the new X Plus and Elite windows laptops. I'm looking to upgrade from my Air M1 to a 14" machine and the M1 Pro MBPs seem like the best value purchase. Macs are sturdier, look better, don't have a bloated and ad ridden software, no need to search for random drivers, and their trackpads are better than anything I've tried on windows.

iPhone on the other hand I can't stand. Basic keyboard, no clipboard, no universal back button, poor notification management, locked in to App store, no proper file system. It's the worst of Apple, you're locked in and everything requires $$$.
 

SpotOnT

macrumors 6502a
Dec 7, 2016
924
1,950
Windows 11 "hack" is semi-official as it was published on a Microsoft website with an appropriate disclaimer...

You make it sound like Microsoft is in anyway involved in these community built patches…

Microsoft lets you talk about these hacks on its discussion boards - but that is a long cry from making it official in anyway. I mean I have read about Microsoft Office keygens on Microsoft’s discussion board, that doesn’t mean Microsoft officially supports generating fake license for it’s products…
 

TheGoog

macrumors member
Jul 11, 2008
55
65
You make it sound like Microsoft is in anyway involved in these community built patches…

Microsoft lets you talk about these hacks on its discussion boards - but that is a long cry from making it official in anyway. I mean I have read about Microsoft Office keygens on Microsoft’s discussion board, that doesn’t mean Microsoft officially supports generating fake license for it’s products…

You seem to be mistaken, thinking that this was in any ways introduced or created by 3rd parties.

The community became aware of this method by Microsoft themselves posting how to do it right here.
 

ignatius345

macrumors 604
Aug 20, 2015
7,202
11,989
Unless anyone has and hard data on this, the replies will just be filled with personal anecdotes. And given we’re on an Apple forum, perhaps these will be skewed positively for Apple.
Ars Technica has done some pretty solid research into how long Macs are officially supported. Here are a few of the key bullet points from this article. (The article is mainly about Intel Macs and how long they might be supported, hence the focus on that).

  • For all Mac models tracked, the average Mac receives about 6.6 years of macOS updates that add new features, plus another two years of security-only updates. 2017's crop of Macs will get about 6.3 years of macOS updates, a little under the historical average.
  • The average Mac receives updates for about 5.5 years after Apple stops selling it. Buying a Mac toward the end of its life cycle means getting significantly fewer updates.
  • The three longest-lived Macs are still the mid-2007 15- and 17-inch MacBook Pros, the mid-2010 Mac Pro, and the mid-2007 iMac, which received new macOS updates for around nine years after they were introduced (and security updates for around 11 years).
  • The shortest-lived Mac is still the late-2008 version of the white MacBook, which received only 2.7 years of new macOS updates and another 3.3 years of security updates from the time it was introduced. (Late PowerPC-era and early Intel-era Macs are all pretty bad by modern standards).

Also, for anyone wanting to dig in, Everymac has tons of info on which OSes any given Mac shipped with and how far it can officially be updated.
 
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