Perhaps a stupid question about Ports, Torrents, and Transmission

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Queenredspecial, Oct 2, 2009.

  1. Queenredspecial macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    #1
    Basically, I want to know -- what is a port?

    Sorry for the stupid question, but I looked and I couldn't find anything that explains it to me. I looked in the Network settings, and couldn't find it...

    Basically, I am trying to troubleshoot a slow Transmission torrent download, and the one thing I can't do is 'check the ports' -- because I don't even know what that means. :)

    I have a MBP and am running OS 10.4.11...

    Thanks!
     
  2. johnrs macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Location:
    Nottingham - UK
    #2
    could be a few things with a slow connection. one is a closed port.

    go here and enter the port your app is using and see if its open or not.

    http://www.utorrent.com/testport

    Sometimes in trial and error until you find an open port

    Also if you limit you upload ratio that can also have an effect on your dload speed. I am sure that someone with a better understanding of ports will be a long to help further
     
  3. BlueRevolution macrumors 603

    BlueRevolution

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Location:
    Montreal, QC
    #3
    A port is a number used to direct network traffic. Basically, there are a lot of different applications using your internet connection for a lot of different things. You might be torrenting with Transmission, browsing the web with Safari, streaming music with iTunes, and updating your system with Software Update. The port is a number that indicates what application should handle ("listen to") a particular connection.

    Before someone corrects me, ports apply specifically incoming connections rather than outgoing. The only application in my example that would handle incoming connections (from other BitTorrent users) is Transmission, which is why it's important to ensure that it is properly configured to do so. The others initiate connections to ports on other computers and receive data in reply, but don't expect to see other computers connecting to them.
     
  4. Queenredspecial thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    #4
    Ok -- so I get what a port is -- thanks, BlueRevolution.

    Now -- is there a set number of ports on my computer or network?

    And how do I know what they are, in order to ensure they are 'configured properly?' In Transmission, next to the port status, it tells me that it cannot be verified.

    When I go to the speed test site, (which I tried before, incidentally,) it asks me for a port number.

    :confused:
     
  5. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #5
    The port would be in the router settings. So on your router, you should have default IP address, such as 192.168.1.1 or something like that. So you would type that into the search box in google.

    I don't know whether you have a password setup on your router or not. I am sure you have a WPA setup?
     
  6. Queenredspecial thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    #6
    Hmmm... What is WPA?

    I just looked on my modem, as I have before -- and there is no such number. Only a serial number -- it's an RCA cable modem.
     
  7. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
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    SLC
    #7
    you have a modem AND a router, correct? You connected right to the modem?
    WPA http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi_Protected_Access
     
  8. Queenredspecial thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 14, 2009
    #8
  9. runplaysleeprun macrumors 6502a

    runplaysleeprun

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #9
    Or, do you connect directly to your modem and use some software to connect to the internet? if this is the case, you wouldn't be able to connect to it in the manner decribed above (using the 192.168.1.1 address).

    If you connect to a router, then you can use that address, just don't type it into the google search bar like suggested above, type it into your address bar where you input website addresses.
     
  10. runplaysleeprun macrumors 6502a

    runplaysleeprun

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #10
    Alright, I believe its dependent on the software your ISP has supplied you, but I will leave this to more experienced hands. But my understanding is that unless you have a firewall running (in Security in System Preferences I believe), and your ISP's software doesn't have its own way of blocking ports, you should be good.

    I would recomend leaving your Firewall in the Security pane of System Preferences on, but adding an exeption for the ports you need open.
     
  11. Queenredspecial thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    #11
    So it seems the settings (which I have never changed, so I assume they are default,) have my firewall off.

    So it's not that. As far as the bolded part of you message -- how do I check if my ISP's software is blocking my ports? More importantly -- how do I check my ports, or know what they are?
     
  12. BlueRevolution macrumors 603

    BlueRevolution

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Location:
    Montreal, QC
    #12
    Yes. You're limited to 65535 of them. :rolleyes:

    You can see the port Transmission is currently using under Transmission -> Preferences -> Network -> Peer listening port. Go to canyouseeme.org and enter that port number, and see what it says.
     
  13. HBOC macrumors 68020

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    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #13
    I meant address bar :) tired this morning when i posted that..
     

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