Perhaps a stupid question about power adapters

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by puma1552, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #1
    I bought a MBA here in Japan and noticed that, as is consistent with Japanese standard, the magsafe adapter is only two prong (no three prong outlets in Japan). I then realized I didn't remember seeing a third grounding prong on the magsafe adapter for my Uni MBP which was purchased in America from the American online store and shipped to me by my sister, so I pulled it out and sure enough, it also only has two prongs, and no third grounding prong.

    How is Apple able to not ground the products?
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    Ground is not a necessary element of a plug (obviously). As far as "why," there's no good reason I can think of not to ground a plug.
     
  3. puma1552 thread starter macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #3
    So basically our computers are at and will continue to be at greater risk than every other computer when we are not near a surge protector...interesting.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    Every MagSafe ships with a 3-prong cord that you can use if you need the ground.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. puma1552 thread starter macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #5
    Right but should you not always ground a $2500 machine?

    If Apple chose form over function for THIS just to be able to have flip-shut outlet prongs on the adapter, that's really sad.
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    There's no need to ground if you're using a surge protector (which you should, if you care about your "$2500 machine").
     
  7. mlts22 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    #7
    The power adapter is grounded. What is being fed your machine is 12VDC current, where grounding is nice, but not needed as it is with high voltage AC. In fact, with DC current, grounding does little unless a circuit is designed to use the ground as part of the active travel path like how most cars use the exterior rather than worrying about return wires.
     

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