photo critique

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by AppleIntelRock, Jun 16, 2008.

  1. AppleIntelRock macrumors 65816

    AppleIntelRock

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2006
    #1
  2. M@lew macrumors 68000

    M@lew

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #2
    Not bad, could be lomo shots I guess. Too much Sepia/warm tint in some of them though.
     
  3. shecky Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #3
    ok.

    based on these images, it is neither dramatic nor abstract. in fact, while i find many of them to be decent enough photos, i find all of them to be quite pedestrian and expected. i think that for these "typical" kinds of photos yours look fine, tho i do find they fall flat a lot - not sure if that is done in postprocessing or what, but the overriding sepia tonality to them combined with the relative flatness (and by that i mean lack of contrast visually, gesturally, and tone-aly). to me they feel very photoshopped in an effort to make average photos unaverage. i do not know if that is true, but thats how it feels.

    what i think would make these images much more engaging is for you to move away from the representational quality of the images and toward the formal quality. show me not the top of a column of a building, instead show me the force of weight, compression and time on a stone pier. show me the heavyness contrasted with the lightness of the ornament. etc..

    if you like abstract, take a look at the work of Aaron Siskind if you have not already.

    EDIT: i just remembered this, might be helpful.

    i was critiquing a graduating student recently (i teach graphic design) and his work was OK. it was well executed. he knew how to use type. he knew how to use a grid. etc... but for some reason it all fell flat. it just did not DO anything for me. it was competent. we got to chatting and it turns out he is a musician. he was telling about playing music and his eyes lit up, he was animated, his body language totally changed. I stopped him in mid-sentence and asked him "do you love music?" he paused and said "of course." i asked, "would you play music even if you never got paid for it, never got a record deal?" he laughed and said "got paid for it? it cost me an arm and a leg to play music for equipment, etc.. and i would do it no matter what it cost."

    I told him that emotion, that drive, that LOVE was what was missing from his work. his work looked like someone programmed a computer to make it for him. it needed the love.

    i feel the same way about your work.
     
  4. AppleIntelRock thread starter macrumors 65816

    AppleIntelRock

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2006
    #4
    thanks for the input. i'm actually very passionate about photography...
    those images you linked to- I think- were over-saturated and too dark... I'm not interested in shooting like that. do you have any tips?
     
  5. hector macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Location:
    Cheltenham, UK
    #5
    I like them, not particularly 'abstract' but I like the composition and the warm feel.
    IMO you need to bring the contrast out more because as Shecky mentioned they are a bit flat - try fiddling around with the PP
     
  6. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #6
    I don't think he meant "flat" in image quality. I think he was referring to their overall conceptual punch (or lack thereof). These look to me like details, not complete "statements", as if I should click on each one to see a more complete photo. You might try looking for more unexpected juxtapositions to focus on, or else allow more into the frame to give us more of a sense of a subject in an environment. The subject should be clear, and the environment should give us the context that makes the subject more meaningful or interesting.
     
  7. hector macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Location:
    Cheltenham, UK
    #7
    Ok my mistake, I meant flat as in not enough contrast. Particularly images 3, 4, 5 and 10 could be improved by fiddling around with the exposure I think.
     
  8. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #8
    Your pix are fine - as a small collection of architectural details - but they don't really back up your statement that your photographic style is "dramatic and abstract". I can't detect any drama... and they're not particularly abstract.

    Finding a 'style' is easier than finding a genuine 'voice' in photography: ie finding out, over time, what you really want to say...

    Personally, I'd prefer the shots 'straight', rather than toned. There's plenty of found colour 'out there', IMO, without creating it artificially. Plays of light will create its own sense of drama.

    Just carry on photographing... maybe broaden your range of subject matter... and let your photographic 'style' develop naturally...
     

Share This Page