Photography tours

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by OzBok, Jan 27, 2017.

  1. OzBok macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2016
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #1
    hi everyone,
    Sending the wife away on a retreat and now I'm thinking I wouldn't mind a trip myself so been looking up photography tours. I'm sure some of you here have done them. Any tips on what to look for and what to avoid?

    I just noticed a landscape one run by Justin Reznick. Anybody done one with him? And if so how did you find it.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Cheese&Apple macrumors 68000

    Cheese&Apple

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto
    #2
    A photo workshop/tour can be a great way to develop and hone skills and bring home some awesome images. Where you go and who you go with depends on your interests and budget. Well known/big name workshop leaders will cost more and so will long distance travel to exotic locations.

    I don't know anything about Justin Reznick but, whether it's Reznick or anyone else:
    • Research, research, then do more research
    • Look for online reviews that are independent of the workshop leader's webpage
    • Look at the leader's images carefully
      • The leader will instruct you to shoot in their style - if you don't like his/her work, I would look elsewhere
      • If you can't find any of their work, I would look elsewhere
      • If the leader doesn't have his/her own shots of the location you've chosen, it's likely that person has never been there (yes, that happens), I would look elsewhere
    • Like any big purchase, read the terms and conditions carefully. Make sure you know what is and isn't covered by the workshop leader's fees
    • Do what you've done here with your post and look for word of mouth referrals from people who have done a workshop with the person or group you're considering
    As I said, these photo workshops can be great but there are a lot of disappointed stories as well. You can find them by searching for something like "photography workshops what do i need to know".

    ~ Peter
     
  3. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #3
    trip to where and to shoot what....landscapes, wildlife. architecture....?

    the devil is indeed in the details ;)
     
  4. OzBok thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2016
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #4
    Thanks @Cheese&Apple. Few things in that list I hadn't thought of doing as yet. Big help!

    My parents are flying us to Italy for their 70th birthdays for a big family reunion. I want to hone the landscape skills before then with ambitions of a nice photobook or hopefully an amazing shot for them as a memento for their wall.

    So I'm looking at landscape tours. Asked about this one, - trip to NZ to be exact, because the price was on the higher side, but the photos look amazing. Debating whether a 10 day one there vs two shorter and cheaper ones is the way to go. There's a lot that seem to just take you places and teach you to shoot, but seems to be less that go into the post processing to get the most out of the shots as part of the package.

    Already ruled out a few, based on photo quality displayed on their websites, some feel like photo would have been better taken from an iPhone.

    Some great ones seeming happy to pass on their knowledge, money aside. And seems to be a stack that emphasize the saying... those that can't... teach.

    My other option is to just get snapping and keep posting here for the awesome learning that comes from simply being on this forum.
    As you say @MCAsan devil is in the details, feel like I'm slowly getting control of the camera.... but learning so much on the finer details in here... cropping.. framing.. what to focus on as subject. I can't thank everybody on here enough for the help and the inspiration!
     
  5. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #5
    I've met Reznick before. really nice and genuine guy. I personally have never done any workshops, since it was more fun and adventurous for me to find my own style. One thing that was previously stated is super important. You NEED to decide what style interests you, and then choose a photographer based on that style.

    More and more i am seeing everyone has the same style of editing, which is not really surprising since a lot of people take other workshops and then branch out on their own. Not saying this is a bad thing at all, but just some details to think about. A lot of people offer editing videos now, so you can apply those teachings (or some aspects of them) to your own workflow.

    I have a video from Chip Phillips that I think is one of the better ones out there - not just the editing style but the commentary. No redundant ramblings. I have a very short attention span :) Another great photographer is Alex Noriega and he has videos out. Marc Adamus has a huge influence on many of the photographers out there, but he books up a year in advance.
     
  6. Phrasikleia, Jan 28, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2017

    Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #6
    I offer a lot of landscape photography workshops myself. Most of mine in 2017 are sold out, but I still have some spots available for the Dolomites (co-leaders are Ted Gore, Alexandre Deschaumes, and Chip Phillips) and the French Alps (co-leader Enrico Fossati). I also had a last-minute cancellation for the first session of my Death Valley and Eastern Sierra series (with co-leader Ted Gore).

    My workshops page: http://www.erinbabnik.com/workshops/

    Dolomites workshop video:

    Whatever you decide to do, have fun! :)

    Oh, and I just noticed your interest in learning post-processing as well. I have substantial processing sessions in all of my workshops (see the video above for a behind-the-scenes look at one of them).
     
  7. Cheese&Apple macrumors 68000

    Cheese&Apple

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto
    #7
    You're welcome @OzBok.

    The advantage of two shorter trips vs one longer:
    • You'll have a chance between to go home and process your shots and take time to digest what you've learned and apply your new skills to a second trip
    • You may have a chance to go at a different time of year for different light and weather conditions
    • You'll be able to meet a different group people
    • By chance you don't like the workshop or leader, you don't have to go the second time - less money spent
    The only advantage of one long trip over two short that I can think of is the cost savings of airfare.

    ~ Peter
     
  8. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #8
    Longer trips have great advantages, and they are the most popular for a reason. You can cover more ground on a long trip, both literally (in terms of the locations that you will visit) and in terms of instruction.

    Locations: On a shorter workshop, you tend to be limited to more accessible locations because there just isn't time to drive or hike very far. You also won't see as many locations in a region, so you'll really just get a taste of it. Also, with less time invested, you're less likely to get really amazing conditions. Sometimes it makes sense to stay in one place for a while just to increase your chances of getting some awesome conditions while you're there.

    Instruction: If you just want some introductory instruction or are interested in a specific technique or two, then a short workshop can be great. You need a longer workshop to get much further than that, though. It takes time to provide a whole range of foundational ideas: composition, in-field techniques, post-processing, meteorological analysis, location research, and personal creative development...these things take time. That's why a lot of us who offer workshops get participants returning again and again to work with us further; even one long workshop can only take you so far.
     
  9. OzBok thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2016
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #9
    @Phrasikleia stunning photos you take! I instantly remembered a couple that were posted in here looking at your website, I've added your site to my bookmarks, already booked for Italy for a month and timing doesn't quite match up(I did have a serious long think about it though) But I dare say I will be looking at your page for my next tour.

    I'm in Australia and with a few things going on before the Italy trip don't want to venture too far from home this time round.

    Great advice from everybody here. Never ceases to amaze me how helpful this community is.
     
  10. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #10
    OzBok, thanks for your kind words! Just about an hour ago I added a new page to my website that is relevant to this thread, especially with regards to why longer workshops can be preferable in some cases:

    LINK: Workshop Instructional Points

    Basically: it takes a lot of time to cover any of those things in any detail, and those are just the highlights of what I find most important.

    At any rate, if you ever have any questions, just let me know!
     
  11. Mark0, Jan 30, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2017

    Mark0 macrumors 6502

    Mark0

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2014
    Location:
    SW Scotland
    #11

    I've no grand delusions of my ability and even though I'm an enthusiast landscape photographer, I've never really seen the need for me to attend a workshop - however your video certainly makes it more appealing! Very well made and absorbing. I've just had a look at your work on your website and love it. There is a certain aesthetics quality and unique look to your work that I find very inspiring.
     
  12. Cheese&Apple macrumors 68000

    Cheese&Apple

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto
    #12
    All good points indeed Erin...thanks for coming back with that.

    I also want to mention that a spin-off benefit of doing a workshop (short or long) is the amazing people you meet along the way. Whether they're leaders or clients, you have something in common that you're passionate about. I don't know what it is about photography but this hobby or business seems to attract some of the nicest people I've ever met.

    Doing a workshop means you could be meeting and spending time with people from anywhere in the world. Workshop leaders or clients, this presents an opportunity to learn a lot about photography and a whole lot more.

    ~ Peter
     
  13. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #13
    What you are looking to do is hone your photography skills. You can do that right where you live. What if you were a tourist visiting the place you live. So no mater were you live, it is just as good as any other place in terms of learning photography.

    THere is a LOT you can teach yourself. The first step is to go to the library can find some big books of images, "coffee table books" if you can get them or collections of photos from famous photographers. Look at a lot of them and find the few you like. THIS is really an important step, finding images you like.

    Next step is to get you r camera and try to emulate the photos you like. Try to shoot in that style. Yes this is ethical. Artist have trained by this method from the beginning of time. Fist you emulate the work of masters and later you have your own style. This gives you a goal and a very specific one. In may case I want to shoot trees that are foubd in nature but have classic compositions of five or seven with one being dominate and warm late in the day lighting. Or maybe I'm after "S" shapes in landscapes or I'm after certain kinds of symmetry. In all cases I'm copying I dead I found in books of photos

    You might need some technical instruction because doing the above is hard

    So, .... You don't need to go some place spacial, you DO need to know what you like ,in some detail. Maybe you need some technical help.

    SO day to day what you do is give yourself an assignment. Shoot 30 to 60 frames and run these through your process of editing and select one to three to keep. Do this a few times a week. Pretend you are a tourist seeing your town for the first time. The assignment must be to emulate some photo in one of the books you found

    You will learn more if you make a commitment to shoot say 100 frames a weeks each with specific self-assignment and goal. If you do this for week after week you wil learn more then by going on a one-time tour.
     
  14. OzBok thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2016
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #14
    Thanks for the feedback.
    This year is definitely all about getting out more, running 5 businesses does get in the way a little more than I'd like, hence the appeal of a tour where I have a week escape and it's all about photography.

    I have spent a lot of time browsing books to see what I like. Have actually booked the tour to NZ now, it's a destination that's been on the list, close to home. More time and money, I'd be booking one of erins trips, though as I said, have them bookmarked for next one.

    Thanks to everybody for the help and advice
     
  15. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #15
    Thanks so much, Mark! Yeah, not everyone who attends my workshops does so for instructional value. Some are more interested in the experience of being with a group of other keen landscape photographers, for the fun of it. Some are just very busy and appreciate not having to do the research for location knowledge and trip planning. I get quite a number of full-time professional landscape photographers on my workshops, and they usually want a mixture of things...often they do want to be exposed to some new techniques, but also they just like having a trip where all they have to do is show up and have fun. :)
     

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