Please pass the ion.

stubeeef

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Aug 10, 2004
2,702
2
OK, I've been geeking out on sci crap and here is another. It is a diversion from the other forums, one of which drives me nutz. So here goes another one for your digestion.

Link
Think Star Trek: You are here. You want to go there. It's just a matter of teleportation.

Thanks to lab experiments, there is growth in the number of "beam me up" believers, but there is an equal amount of disbelief, too.

Over the last few years, however, researchers have successfully teleported beams of light across a laboratory bench. Also, the quantum state of a trapped calcium ion to another calcium ion has been teleported in a controlled way.

These and other experiments all make for heady and heavy reading in scientific journals. The reports would have surely found a spot on Einstein's night table. For the most part, it's an exotic amalgam of things like quantum this and quantum that, wave function, qubits and polarization, as well as uncertainty principle, excited states and entanglement.

Seemingly, milking all this highbrow physics to flesh out point-to-point human teleportation is a long, long way off.

Well, maybe...maybe not.

A trillion trillion atoms

In his new book, Teleportation - The Impossible Leap, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., writer David Darling contends that ""One way or another, teleportation is going to play a major role in all our futures. It will be a fundamental process at the heart of quantum computers, which will themselves radically change the world."

Darling suggests that some form of classical teleportation and replication for inanimate objects also seems inevitable. But whether humans can make the leap, well, that remains to be seen.

Teleporting a person would require a machine that isolates, appraises, and keeps track of over a trillion trillion atoms that constitute the human body, then sends that data to another locale for reassembly--and hopefully without mussing up your physical and mental makeup.

"One thing is certain: if that impossible leap turns out to be merely difficult--a question of simply overcoming technical challenges--it will someday be accomplished," Darling predicts.

In this regard, Darling writes that the quantum computer "is the joker in the deck, the factor that changes the rules of what is and isn't possible."

Just last month, in fact, scientists at Hewlett Packard announced that they've hammered out a new tactic for a creating a quantum computer—using switches of light beams rather than today's run of the mill, transistor-laden devices. What's in the offing is hardware capable of making calculations billions of times faster than any silicon-based computer.

Given quantum computers and the networking of these devices, Darling senses the day may not be far off for routine teleportation of individual atoms and molecules. That would lead to teleportation of macromolecules and microbeswith, perhaps, human teleportation to follow.
A real question, and by the way the link has lots more, is if you parts get lost out there, can someone google you back together?
Teleporting the light beam is old news, just thought this was an interesting article.
 

Does this process actually send molecules or just information about the molecules? If it is just information, wouldn't you have to have a stockpile of atoms at the other end to build with? That would be alot of materials to transport via convential methods to the teleportation sight. I would hate to be the last person transported when the assembler ran out of hydrogen. And then there are software bugs to worry about. Yikes.
 

Don't panic

macrumors 603
Jan 30, 2004
5,551
695
having a drink at Milliways
anonymous161 said:
Does this process actually send molecules or just information about the molecules? If it is just information, wouldn't you have to have a stockpile of atoms at the other end to build with? That would be alot of materials to transport via convential methods to the teleportation sight. I would hate to be the last person transported when the assembler ran out of hydrogen. And then there are software bugs to worry about. Yikes.
don't worry, it will run on longhorn.
 

emw

macrumors G4
Aug 2, 2004
11,177
0
Don't panic said:
don't worry, it will run on longhorn.
:D

But you're assuming Longhorn will be released by then...

stu - interesting stuff. Thanks for the link!
 

aloofman

macrumors 68020
Dec 17, 2002
2,206
0
Socal
Hmm, I wonder if the teleported version would still be you? It would be an exact copy to be sure, but really, your entire body would be completely disintegrated and then re-assembled on the other end. If all the brain atoms weren't in exactly the right place, you might not remember your own name. You could be a vegetable. Or, if you believe in souls, would yours go with you? Or would you be an empty body that had to forge a new identity?

And if you could really sort through all these atoms and put them back in the proper place again, then why not have the toxins filtered out? Why not insert new calcium ions directly into your bones to cure your osteoporosis? You could eliminate the need for abortion by instantaneously removing an embryo from one woman and putting it in another. Or apply medication to the exact location in the body at a much smaller dose.

It seems to me that a teleportation technology would be revolutionary way, way before it was precise enough to teleport a full human. Even if full human transfer never happened, it would be the greatest invention of all time.
 

lalcan

macrumors regular
Sep 8, 2003
147
0
Left of the center
Some -long- time ago, the photocopiers generated similar doubts, but so far noone has been able to create another original of the Giocconda, etc. If we get used to be a copy of the original self, well, what keeps us from ... mmmh, hold it, Scotty is on the line.
 

stoid

macrumors 601
stubeeef said:
A real question, and by the way the link has lots more, is if you parts get lost out there, can someone google you back together?
Teleporting the light beam is old news, just thought this was an interesting article.
Yes, and if it just transmits information, does the original need to be destroyed? Could you create two of more copies on the other side? Instant cloning, and without all the mucking about with stem cells, lol!
 

dubbz

macrumors 68020
Sep 3, 2003
2,284
0
Alta, Norway
stoid said:
Yes, and if it just transmits information, does the original need to be destroyed? Could you create two of more copies on the other side? Instant cloning, and without all the mucking about with stem cells, lol!
Anyone else thinking of the replicators from ST? :D
 

aloofman

macrumors 68020
Dec 17, 2002
2,206
0
Socal
anonymous161 said:
Indeed, you could "copy" everything and each copy would be an original. People, food, the planet, money.
I seem to recall an old sci-fi story about replicating humans. Chaos ensued because each clone insisted that it was the original. And since they were identical in every way, it soon became impossible to tell who the original was.