Please stop using workarounds MBP

simonf66

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 11, 2006
3
0
Happy MBP readers please fight the urge and disregard this thread, it really doesn't concern you.

I have a problem with workarounds, widgets and thermal grease replacement (DIY). If you have to any of these things then you have a faulty computer, it really is that simple.
You are not helping Apple, or anybody else for that matter by running widgets, turning processors off and opening apps like Photobooth. What you should be doing is picking up the phone and complaining. Problems will only be fixed if a sufficient number of complaints are recorded. When spending this kind of money you should expect nothing but the very best. Please stop being sheep and bleating your complaints to each other as this solves absolutely nothing.

My Story:

My 2g MBP had faulty fans, the buzzing and extreme heat. What did i do? took it down to a repair centre and asked them to fix. Before i offered it to them i demanded a loan machine while mine was being repaired. I should expect nothing less.
So now I'm writing this post on a flagship model that doesn't exhibit any of the problems i encountered.

This is my favorite:

If Apple are saying it's 'working within our specified nominal range' Fine? No! ask for the white paper/document that supports this. Then ask for a copy of the transcript/email that your service centre sent to Apple stating the facts and figures of your machine to warrant such a claim. (does it exist?)

Making a fuss is your god given right if you are unhappy with your purchase, use it, and don't back down.

My loan MBP will not be handed over until my machine mirrors it's reliability and working order; I hope it never does because now i have a Flagship loan model with all the upgrades. Shame on you for excepting your problems with workarounds.
 

Hodapp

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2003
579
32
New York, NY
simonf66 said:
If Apple are saying it's 'working within our specified nominal range' Fine? No! ask for the white paper/document that supports this. Then ask for a copy of the transcript/email that your service centre sent to Apple stating the facts and figures of your machine to warrant such a claim. (does it exist?)
The maximum operating temperature of the Core Duo chip is 100C. MacBook Pros operate at less than 100C, therefore, they're operating within spec.

Yeah, shame on me for fixing the thermal paste in my MBP.
 

Sutekidane

macrumors 6502a
Jan 26, 2005
936
1
I would of been happy to send my macbook pro to apple to fix the heat issue, if they wouldn't damage my stuff every time I've sent it to them. I've send ipods, 12" ibooks and powerbooks, and a 15" G4 powerbook for repair of minor issues and they all came back with cosmetic damage of varying severity on them. Other people have claimed the same. I simply don't trust apple with my stuff.
 

ero87

macrumors 65816
Jan 17, 2006
1,196
1
New York City
io_burn said:
The maximum operating temperature of the Core Duo chip is 100C. MacBook Pros operate at less than 100C, therefore, they're operating within spec.

Yeah, shame on me for fixing the thermal paste in my MBP.
You're right OP, we should be making a fuss. But some of us can't get "loan" computers and are too afraid to lose our computer for a week.

Also, it takes a lot of pride to admit that you aren't 100% satisfied in your new $2,000 machine.
 

Hodapp

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2003
579
32
New York, NY
The problem is the temperature ranges are within spec of the Core Duo chip. Nothing is overheating, it's only running on the high-end of the thermal range. I can promise you that Apple won't do anything about this. Whine and moan all you want about it, but at the end of the day, these computers are working within a safe temperature range.
 

simonf66

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 11, 2006
3
0
Hi IO BURN

What a stunning array of Apple equipment you have, i nearly had to scroll.

My point is I don't really care about Intel temperatures, but i do care about case temperatures and that i would like to see documented. If the case and it's components are not properly manufactured to the standards of dispersing that much heat then a problem is inevitable.

As i said, and i hate to repeat myself. My loan machine (same as yours) works perfectly so there is a clear defect with mine which runs twice as hot with no fan activity whatsoever.

I understand that you feel loyal to Apple and jump every-time to catch that bullet, but unfortunately they let a good deal of us down with the MBP

I enjoy Apple software and Hardware, but i will not defend them if they get it wrong.

s
 

Hodapp

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2003
579
32
New York, NY
Again, the safe operating temperature of pretty much every electronic device is under 100C. If the PROCESSOR CORE is operating at 97C like mine was, how hot do you think the rest of the computer is? According to my infrared thermometer, before re-pasting the hot areas of my MBP's case were around 50C. Neither of these temperatures are hot enough to damage anything.
 

simonf66

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 11, 2006
3
0
Wow, your really into this computer stuff aren't you. I returned mine because it burnt me; didn't need any tools or software for it to tell me that. I don't know what the problem is here, Apple put there hands up and admitted fault so why are we going through this.

I understand your MBP works perfectly, although i am just a little curious as to why you felt compelled to change the grease if it worked so admirably.

Unfortunately mine was faulty; not so lucky. I just don't understand why you are throwing all these facts and figures at me when Apple have accepted fault.

hey on a friendly note, tell me something... did you use the Apple stickers when you got your MBP, come on, did you? :)
 

Hodapp

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2003
579
32
New York, NY
simonf66 said:
I understand your MBP works perfectly, although i am just a little curious as to why you felt compelled to change the grease if it worked so admirably.
I re-applied the thermal paste for the same reason people get aftermarket exhausts for their cars. It performs better.
 

macsrockmysocks

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2006
233
0
hey on a friendly note, tell me something... did you use the Apple stickers when you got your MBP, come on, did you? :)
YES!!!!! Except the bad part was I kept carrying them everywhere trying to find a spot for them, and I lost mine....:( . I got mine with my Intel iMac though.:D
 

mmmcheese

macrumors 6502a
Feb 17, 2006
948
0
I hardly call a slight noise a "defect." There are laptops out there that are twice as loud....you can even buy a new car that has a rattle, and it is all well within the manufacturer's tolerances.... What you consider "perfect" and what the manufacturer considers "perfect" are two different things. I wonder when people are going to start to understand that.
 

indigoflowAS

macrumors 6502
Oct 31, 2005
268
0
Columbus, OH
I agree fully with the OP.

Whether the Core Duo is rated to operate at such high temperatures...I don't belive it still justifies thermal grease being poorly applied and seeing such drastic differences when it is applied correctly. Something is wrong...there is little way around that.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,257
1,338
io_burn said:
The problem is the temperature ranges are within spec of the Core Duo chip. Nothing is overheating, it's only running on the high-end of the thermal range.
The CPU may not be overheating, but the case surely is hotter than need be.

I compared my personal MBP to my work T60 (Core Duo). After 5 minutes of running both systems at 100% CPU, the bottom of the MBP casing was too hot to touch. The keyboard/palm wrests weren't burning hot, but everyone at work that "tested it out" said that they were uncomfortable. Peoples hands were sweating after a minute or two.

The T60 didn't break a sweat. As a matter of fact, after 5 minutes, there wasn't an area on the case (top or bottom) that felt any warmer than room temperature.

So I'm glad that the MBPs Core Duo CPU is running within specs, but the end result is that the MBP can easily be uncomfortably hot to use.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,257
1,338
io_burn said:
I re-applied the thermal paste for the same reason people get aftermarket exhausts for their cars. It performs better.
Other than your casing being cooler (which is exactly what people are looking for Apple to provide), what other performance benefits are you seeing aftering re-applying the thermal paste?
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,257
1,338
mmmcheese said:
I hardly call a slight noise a "defect." There are laptops out there that are twice as loud....
Right, and the last generation of Apple's 15" PowerBooks wasn't one of them.

Except for the soft whir when the fans kicked in, the thing was DEAD SILENT. :eek:

IMO, that's where Apple set the bar, and there's no reason for people who owned those to expect anything less with the current generation, especially when folks in the community have come up with ways to silence the whining sound. :rolleyes:

And that's the other point ... noise from a cooling fan is one thing, but an electronic whining sound is entirely different. And FWIW, depending on where you're sitting with your MBP, what you call a "slight noise" can become a heck of a lot louder!
 

slyydrr

macrumors newbie
Mar 22, 2006
22
0
I agree with you OP, you have a very valid point. Through the simple laws of economics, that would be the best protocol to follow to pull the best response on Apple's end. However, the nearest Apple store to me is 45 minutes, and then dealing with their service department, plus the drive back, would take more time that me opening up my own machine and fixing things.

For some people it's a matter of convenience rather than hoping to yield a positive response from Apple.

You sir, are right--I just don't have the convenience of time at the moment. :(
 

Hodapp

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2003
579
32
New York, NY
mmmcheese said:
I hardly call a slight noise a "defect." There are laptops out there that are twice as loud....you can even buy a new car that has a rattle, and it is all well within the manufacturer's tolerances.... What you consider "perfect" and what the manufacturer considers "perfect" are two different things. I wonder when people are going to start to understand that.
NEVER! I DEMAND EVERY PRODUCT I PURCHASE TO BE OF THE SAME QUALITY AS A F QUALITY INTERNALLY AND EXTERNALLY FLAWLESS DIAMOND!

My favorite whiners are the dead LCD pixel whiners. I DON'T CARE IF ONE DEAD PIXEL IS WITHIN TOLERANCES! MY DISPLAY IS DEFECTIVE!!! :eek: :eek:

aristobrat said:
Other than your casing being cooler (which is exactly what people are looking for Apple to provide), what other performance benefits are you seeing aftering re-applying the thermal paste?
Thermal performance?

You guys need to get over this. Apple is never going to release a service bulletin, or a recall for the heat problems. At the end of the day the MacBook Pro is operating within spec. If you want to enhance the cooling performance of your laptop, you'll have to do it yourself.

Even at their hottest in the MBP, the Core Duo chip only hits mid-90C. Whether you like it or not, this is within the operating temperature ranges.

Sorry.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,257
1,338
io_burn said:
At the end of the day the MacBook Pro is operating within spec. If you want to enhance the cooling performance of your laptop, you'll have to do it yourself.
I don't think anyone in this thread is arguing that the Core Duo CPU in the MacBook Pro *ISN'T* operating within spec.

It's the COOLING SYSTEM (you know, the thing that's supposed to get rid of the CPU's heat before it turns the MBP case into a stove) that isn't operating within the specs of Apple's customers.

io_burn said:
I re-applied the thermal paste for the same reason people get aftermarket exhausts for their cars. It performs better.
Still curious in what other ways than "it's not so hot anymore" that your MBP performs better after your thermal paste reapplication.
 

ManchesterTrix

macrumors 6502
Feb 24, 2005
324
0
io_burn said:
The maximum operating temperature of the Core Duo chip is 100C. MacBook Pros operate at less than 100C, therefore, they're operating within spec.
I'm pretty sure that my MBP downclocking itself to 1000 Mhz to stay under 100C is not "within normal operating spec."