Point-and-shoot with best quality

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by secretpact, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. secretpact macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    #1
    Which point and shoot has the best quality? I'm not looking for megapixels, I'm looking for taking the best pictures.
     
  2. luminosity macrumors 65816

    luminosity

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Location:
    Arizona
  3. vga4life macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #3
    It depends.

    What do you mean by a "point & shoot?" Basically every DSLR can operate in a fully-automatic "point & shoot" mode. Any DSLR will take better pictures than any small-sensor compact camera in almost any conditions. (OK, a G10 can probably out-resolve a 5-year-old Digital Rebel in bright daylight. It won't perform as well in lower light, and it will still have shutter lag, etc.)

    If you mean a pocketable compact camera, it depends on the pictures you want to take. If you're photographing in low-light situations, the Fuji F31fd (even though it's been discontinued for almost 2 years) is still the champion compact camera. Check the prices on eBay - it sells for more now than it did when it was new.

    If you're photographing in bright light, the Canon G10 will outresolve basically any other compact camera on the market - but it will let you down when the lights dim compared to the Fuji or the Panasonic DMC-LX3.

    I personally only see the point in an 'ultra-compact' since I already have a couple of DSLRs - if a camera is too big to slip into my front pocket alongside my cell phone without looking silly, I might as well be carrying my 5D. For now, I use an old Panasonic DMC-FX01 as my 'pocket camera' for casual circumstances where an SLR is too much to carry. It is pretty crappy in low light but is very small and attractive, with a wide-ish lens. I'd probably get the equivalent DMC-FX37 today for the same purpose if I was buying a new one today.

    (Of course, Olympus might change my tune depending on how small they can make their upcoming Micro Four Thirds bodies and pancake lenses - but all I can do is wait and see what they come up with.)
     
  4. pdxflint macrumors 68020

    pdxflint

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon coast
    #4
    It kind of depends on some other criteria... what's your budget, how much control do you want to be able to have, what wide-angle or telephoto coverage do you need? Are you concerned with image quality at higher ISO ranges, or just in daylight? You could go from Leica/Panasonic Lumix advanced cameras that will also deliver RAW images to a full-frame (FX) point 'n shoot which is more like the old rangefinder cameras... definitely not low-end stuff. The above mentioned G10 is fairly advanced and offers lots of manual control. There are just so many point 'n shoot cameras out there that are fairly comparable in image quality, but quite different in handling and style...

    The main thing is... the camera you have in your hands will produce a stunning image compared to the camera you left at home or at the store... so read a few reviews at web sites like dpreview and dcresource.com and then go try some cameras on for size at a decent camera store...
     
  5. leighonigar macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    #5
    As mentioned it's going to be the Panasonic DMC-LX3, Canon G10, or perhaps the Sigma DP1. They do each have somewhat different strengths however and you need to decide what you want the camera to do exactly.

    (the panasonic has a wonderful wide-zoom for instance, but it doesn't have much on the telephoto end, while the canon goes longer but not as wide).

    A much cheaper but pretty reasonable camera would be the fuji F100fd. It doesn't have all the manual controls of the above but can take great photographs, in the right conditions.
     
  6. DSG macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    #6
    Ricoh GR Digital II. Beautiful fixed 28mm-equivalent lens (with the option of adding supplementary lenses) and really elegant design. Unlike the Canon, the Ricoh is small enough to be honestly referred to as a compact camera and is the perfect complement to an SLR.
     
  7. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #7
    I would check into Canon's line. The G9 is great, the G10 ... I've read mixed reviews. I would head over to dpreview.com and check each camera and the sample images they provide. Everything else is just personal opinion of many MR users. :)
     
  8. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    #8
    Assuming you're thinking of the Leica M8/M8.2 - those have a 1.33 crop factor using an 18x27mm sensor. And probably priced out of just about everyone's price range...
     
  9. Apple Ink macrumors 68000

    Apple Ink

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    #9
    --------------do-----------

    To add, I've 'heard', repeat 'heard' that G10 has grain issues above 400! A little research is in order....
     
  10. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    #10
    Most if not all point & shoot cameras have noise issues at high ISO's. It's a result of their small sensors.
     
  11. Apple Ink macrumors 68000

    Apple Ink

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    #11
    That is pretty much expected... what I meant was that from a Canon G standard it shows more noise.... besides you are paying as much as a DSLR with the G10 so it definitely should show better performances than average pns cameras!
     
  12. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    #12
    I would try to resist the temptation to compare apples with oranges. Price is only one product characteristic. There are others, such as size, features, etc. Canon could improve high ISO performance on this camera by reducing the megapixel count, but the person likely to buy this camera is more influenced by the latter than the former.
     
  13. Apple Ink macrumors 68000

    Apple Ink

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    #13
    Having shoved a lot of money in the bottomless pit named 'photography'... I can attest to that fact and agree to it fully!
    And I also agree that the latter comment I made is quite not apt for this section and thread.... you are absolutely right in saying that Canon's main aim is to push on features than performance in such a camera... and seemingly they did and also allegedly degraded the performance!!

    I just feel sometimes that people should really look above megapixels and features at the core performance.... but here again you are correct at saying that hardly many people interested in such a camera would even understand what iso and noise is...lol!!

    Oh... and OP, I found that the G10 has a 35mm equivalent focal length of 28mm as compared to G9's 32mm... meaning you have a wider perspective than the G9.
     
  14. gkarris macrumors 604

    gkarris

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Location:
    "No escape from Reality..."
    #14
    As far as pic quality, I've had the best luck in recent years with Canon. From their cheapest A470 ($85) for work and mid-range ones.

    I got blasted before for recommending a dSLR over the G10, as for the G10's price, you might as well go up to a dSLR and get the larger sensor.

    This is has been discussed before - do a search.

    Here's some links:

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=632615 (has examples from my "cheap" Canon P&S - better than a lot of other manufacturer's more expensive ones).

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=611397
     
  15. jakfrost macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2008
    Location:
    Ontario Canada
    #15
    Hmmm, well since no size was specified in the 'point and shoot' criteria then I have to lob in my fav 'p&s' backup camera, which by the way, stays in my main camera bag 90% of the time...

    The Canon SD880 IS ( and its predecessor the 870 ) have been stalwart image makers, for me anyway, for a number of years now.

    Small enough, ( smaller than my western dig 250Gb backups ) to fit into the smallest pocket either on my camera bag or person...with optical image stabilization as opposed to 'digital' these are wonderful point and shoot cameras.

    Just ask Ken Rockwell :D. Now that should stir something up :p.

    If nothing else its a good place to store and extra SD card ;).

    Jim
     

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