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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Apple with iOS 17.1 and watchOS 10.1 introduced a new NameDrop feature that is designed to allow users to place Apple devices near one another to quickly exchange contact information. Sharing contact information is done with explicit user permission, but some news organizations and police departments have been spreading misinformation about how NameDrop functions.

ios-17-namedrop.jpg

As noted by The Washington Post, there have been warnings about NameDrop popping up on FaceTime. Police departments in Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, Ohio, and other states have been suggesting that contact information can be shared "just by bringing your phones close together." From the City of Chester Police Department in Ohio:
IMPORTANT PRIVACY UPDATE: If you have an iPhone and have done the recent iOS 17 update, they have set a new feature called NameDrop defaulted to ON. This feature allows the sharing of your contact info just by bringing your phones close together. To shut this off go to Settings, General, AirDrop, Bringing Devices Together. Change to OFF.
While it's true that NameDrop is turned on by default, the way that it functions is more nuanced than simply putting two iPhones near each other.

NameDrop works when two iPhones running iOS 17.1 or an iPhone with iOS 17.1 and an Apple Watch running watchOS 10.1 are placed right next to each other, as in almost touching. When the two devices come in close contact and both are unlocked, there is a pop up prompting users to share contact information or an image.

Contact information is not shared automatically, and it is a user-initiated process that requires both people exchanging information to accept the transfer. While an accidental exchange could occur, it would require a user to unlock their device and accept the sharing prompt for that to occur.

Multiple police departments posted the warning above, which was widely shared on Facebook and other social networks. The message from the Noble County Sheriff's Office in Ohio, for example, got upwards of 70,000 shares, while the Dewey Police Department in Pennsylvania's warning was shared 11,000 times. After criticism from some commenters, Noble County edited its message to clarify that there's a popup to transfer content, and Dewey County said that it was attempting to "get parents engaged with their children," but many people who saw the original post may not see the updates.
The intent of the post was to get parents engaged with their children and what they are doing on their devices, not the fear mongering as suggested. We suggest everyone do research on new technology and updates to learn more about what is out there, especially for kids
Several local news stories have also shared similar questionable NameDrop information. KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh, for example, interviewed several people and included quotes suggesting NameDrop happens automatically.
"That's why I turned it off because I don't have a use for it. I don't even have my phone at work so I don't really have a use for it. But I guess a default on could be a bit controversial just because I think giving out your contact should be a conscious decision and not something that could accidentally happen," Jerry said.

"That is a little bit concerning, I think it should be an optional feature instead of automatically happening," said Liz Jones.
If anything, NameDrop has the potential to be more irritating than dangerous, simply because it's likely to activate when your phone is next to someone else's and unlocked, in a situation like a dinner or meeting. Given the negative feedback, Apple may in a future update turn NameDrop off by default, but those who want to disable it now can do so by opening up the Settings app, going to the General section, tapping AirDrop, and turning off "Bringing Devices Together."

Article Link: Police Departments and News Sites Spreading Misinformation About How iOS 17 NameDrop Feature Works
 
Last edited:

robbo_syd

macrumors newbie
Jun 14, 2018
14
21
What *is* a stupid default is that sharing your iCloud contact and photo via iMessage, is turned on since a few iOS's ago... so any random tradesperson, delivery driver, etc that you reply to can get that... that's worse IMHO, tell your friends to disable it. ("Share name and Photo" in Messages settings)
 

sw1tcher

macrumors 603
Jan 6, 2004
5,132
16,886
Man the number of people on twitter the last 2 days up in arms over this has been absolutely hilarious.

“Why didn’t Apple tell us” - they did. Read your release notes.

“This is a privacy invasion.” - you have to confirm it every time.

I forget what else I’ve read.
If you NameDrop your contact info, hackers can also capture your birth date and Social Security number.
 

brofkand

macrumors 65816
Jun 11, 2006
1,180
2,832
The yearly OS release cycle puts pressure on Apple to build silly features like this (I remember it wasn't that long ago that Craig mocked having to "bump phones together") but then make them on by default even when nobody asked for it.

It's time for the yearly release cycle to end I think for a lot of reasons.
 

Rafagon

macrumors 6502a
Jun 19, 2011
743
822
Miami, FL
Serious question here.

Does NameDrop check to see if the person whose iPhone is really close to yours already has your contact information in their Contacts before offering to share it with them?

The only thing I would find annoying is getting a pop-up if I accidentally place my iPhone really close to someone's iPhone and they already have a contact card for me on their device.
 

LonestarOne

macrumors 65816
Sep 13, 2019
1,072
1,422
McKinney, TX
It's time for the yearly release cycle to end I think for a lot of reasons.

You can end the yearly cycle any time you choose. No one forces you to buy a new phone. You can keep using the same phone for the rest of your life, if you choose. That doesn’t mean other people shouldn’t be able to upgrade their phones and get new features if they want to. It isn’t all about you.
 

elbolillo

macrumors newbie
Mar 30, 2018
10
34
What *is* a stupid default is that sharing your iCloud contact and photo via iMessage, is turned on since a few iOS's ago... so any random tradesperson, delivery driver, etc that you reply to can get that... that's worse IMHO, tell your friends to disable it. ("Share name and Photo" in Messages settings)
Another incorrect statement on an article about incorrect statements. Oh the irony. There is NO default sharing of your iCloud contact and photo via iMessage. The options are Contacts Only or Always Ask.
 
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