port forwarding question

slipper

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Nov 19, 2003
1,542
32
just need to make sure...

according to my netgears configuration page if i wanted to forward a port for bittorrent for one computer i enter the ports that need to be forwarded and the computers ip address. heres the part i need to make sure, if i wanted to forward the ports for another computer on the network i would add a number 1 to the end of the number? so 6881-6889 for the first computer and 68811-68891 for the next computer?

*another question*
would it be better to use port triggering?
 

varmit

macrumors 68000
Aug 5, 2003
1,830
0
slipper said:
just need to make sure...

according to my netgears configuration page if i wanted to forward a port for bittorrent for one computer i enter the ports that need to be forwarded and the computers ip address. heres the part i need to make sure, if i wanted to forward the ports for another computer on the network i would add a number 1 to the end of the number? so 6881-6889 for the first computer and 68811-68891 for the next computer?

*another question*
would it be better to use port triggering?
triggering would be better since the ports wont be open all the time like they are with port forwarding.
 

abhishekit

macrumors 65816
Nov 6, 2003
1,297
0
akron , ohio
slipper said:
just need to make sure...

according to my netgears configuration page if i wanted to forward a port for bittorrent for one computer i enter the ports that need to be forwarded and the computers ip address. heres the part i need to make sure, if i wanted to forward the ports for another computer on the network i would add a number 1 to the end of the number? so 6881-6889 for the first computer and 68811-68891 for the next computer?

*another question*
would it be better to use port triggering?
Why would you add 1 ? That would open the ports 68811-68891. And those are not used by the bit torrent client (unless you change the default setting). The way to do it would be, enter the second computer's ip and give some port in the range of 6881-6889. And you do not need to open all the 9 ports as well. So say for the first comp, you have 6881 and 6882 open. Then open any of the remaning 8 for the second one.

cheers
 

daveL

macrumors 68020
Jun 18, 2003
2,425
0
Montana
First, the more ports you have open in the 6881-6889, for a single IP address, the better your chances of a rapid download. Triggering would be better, but if you simply turn the ports off on your Mac firewall when you're done, you've basically accomplished the same thing. You can also disable the port forwarding when you've finished (I don't know how often you use BT).

Second, why bother setting up a second, simultaneous, BT client? Everyone is using the same pipe; I doubt the d/ls will complete any faster with two BTs running. BTW, nothing says you can't launch two BTs on the same machine.
 

daveL

macrumors 68020
Jun 18, 2003
2,425
0
Montana
I forgot to add, but I think you already know, that you need to open the same ports on your OS X firewall.
 

vsp

macrumors regular
Jan 23, 2004
127
2
Chico, Ca
I had a lot of trouble getting port forwarding to work properly on a Netgear router. After fussing with it for quite awhile and contacting tech support I gave up on it and moved on.

I posted questions about this on another web site and one reply stated that Netgear basically didn't allow port forwarding of non-standard ports--in his words these were ports above 1500.

This sounded odd to me but would explain all the troubles I was having. Not sure how that would work with all the clients out there that use those ports. Can anyone confirm this? I don't quite buy it but I couldn't get ours to work properly. Port triggering never worked at all, let alone approaching working properly.

Let me know if you have any luck with this. Outside of the port forwarding problem the Netgear router seemed stable.

For daveL: Out of curiosity, if the firewall is enabled on the router why should you have a software firewall up on OSX? Shoudn't you have just one firewall active?
 

daveL

macrumors 68020
Jun 18, 2003
2,425
0
Montana
vsp said:
For daveL: Out of curiosity, if the firewall is enabled on the router why should you have a software firewall up on OSX? Shoudn't you have just one firewall active?
Yes, your router has a firewall. Does it work correctly? Configured correctly? Any bugs in the firmware that can be exploited? It's always a good idea to have the firewall on your machine turned on; it doesn't cost you anything. It's the old "belt and suspenders" approach, 'cause you don't want to be caught with your pants down :)
 

Fender2112

macrumors 65816
Aug 11, 2002
1,085
280
Charlotte, NC
Off Topic but related ...

I am trying to get a Windows / Mac connection set between work and home using Windows Remote Desktop. At home I am using Virtual PC and connect fine to my PC at work. The problem is that I can't come the other way - from Work to VPC on my Mac. What I found is that the LAN IP of VPC is not in the range that I can set on my router (Linksys WRT54G). The IP range of the LAN in 192.168.1.xxx. The VPC LAN IP address id 192.168.131.xxx. Thus I have no way to forward the Remote Desktop request to the proper port.

Any suggestion?
 

daveL

macrumors 68020
Jun 18, 2003
2,425
0
Montana
Fender2112 said:
I am trying to get a Windows / Mac connection set between work and home using Windows Remote Desktop. At home I am using Virtual PC and connect fine to my PC at work. The problem is that I can't come the other way - from Work to VPC on my Mac. What I found is that the LAN IP of VPC is not in the range that I can set on my router (Linksys WRT54G). The IP range of the LAN in 192.168.1.xxx. The VPC LAN IP address id 192.168.131.xxx. Thus I have no way to forward the Remote Desktop request to the proper port.

Any suggestion?
Yes. There are two ways to do networking in VPC. One is shared network, which is what you're using. With a shared network, the only IP seen by your router is the OS X IP. VPC uses NAT to piggyback on the OS X IP. You can change this to "virtual switch" in VPC (I believe that's what it's called). In this case, VPC looks like a separate node on the LAN and will get it's own IP from your router in the same range as your Mac.

HTH
 

Fender2112

macrumors 65816
Aug 11, 2002
1,085
280
Charlotte, NC
daveL said:
Yes. There are two ways to do networking in VPC. One is shared network, which is what you're using. With a shared network, the only IP seen by your router is the OS X IP. VPC uses NAT to piggyback on the OS X IP. You can change this to "virtual switch" in VPC (I believe that's what it's called). In this case, VPC looks like a separate node on the LAN and will get it's own IP from your router in the same range as your Mac.

HTH
Thanks for the tip. That was the missing piece of my puzzle. If you were here I'd give you a big kiss. Well, maybe not. But thanks just the same. :D
 
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