Possible New Dell Style Monitors

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by Superman07, Feb 26, 2009.

  1. Superman07 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2007
    #1
  2. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #2
    At least they're thinking more about style these days. :) Now if they can do it without mucking up the internals, that would be great. :p
     
  3. Sesshi macrumors G3

    Sesshi

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Location:
    One Nation Under Gordon
    #3
    I was sort of hoping that a refined 2707 / 3008 style with the glass base would creep across more model ranges - especially the dated-looking 24". Apparently not. I've seen other colour versions of that and I think it looks cheap.
     
  4. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #4
    Is it me, or is this becoming commonplace?
     
  5. Superman07 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2007
    #5
    That things are more "cheap", or peoples perception as cheap if not x?

    Also, Sesshi may have meant the other glass version he was referencing as cheap and not the item pictured. However, I wasn't entirely clear on Sesshi's point.
     
  6. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #6
    That most products are "cheap", not in comparison to x, as there seem to be very very few X to begin with. :p

    As far as truly cheap, from my POV, the manufacturing side has gotten bad. Shortcuts are take at every possible step. This same management ideology would almost certainly apply to styling as well, as it does cost more $$$ to use better materials, dies (molds), etc. It just irks me to see that much greed, causing products to suffer QC, and even styling. :( Worst case, I'd rather sacrifice styling for functionality (includes proper QC IMO). ;)

    I haven't followed Dell's styling that well, and I didn't look at the specific models he mentioned. I just seem to recall that it's inconsistent, likely given the varied product development cycles.
     
  7. Demosthenes X macrumors 68000

    Demosthenes X

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    #7
    You can't blame companies exclusively for this, though. People want cheap things: why do you think Wal-mart is so successful?
     
  8. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #8
    I'm not. Just expressing what I've seen from the manufacturing end. You'd be surprised just how inexpensive it can be to make something if you have economy of scale on your side. :eek: :D
     
  9. Sesshi macrumors G3

    Sesshi

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Location:
    One Nation Under Gordon
    #9
    I meant your monitor.

    I think that overt design can be frequently complicit in making a product look cheaper than it needs to be. Apple is a master in *not* falling into that trap, but Dell and many others - I think - often have that problem, where the product has very clearly been designed but the overall effect has been to cheapen what could have been something classy. It often happens when you have multiple lineups and need to make distinctions across said lineups.

    Decontenting is as much art as science and engineering, and Apple have moved to further their already very good grasp on the art (if a significantly lower grasp on the last attribute) - while Dell's designers have moved less competently and their engineers move more slowly. Apple's unibody design for example, despite being initially more expensive to tool up for, saves money in the end while increasing consumer perception of quality (regardless of how flawed the execution is, which it is).
     
  10. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #10
    Simplification (fewer parts) is always a good idea. It tends to lower costs, improves reliability, and even improve performance. :)

    Unfortunately, that's not what I was referring to. More along the lines of:
    1. Parts changed from the BOM developed in the design phase for lower cost units (not exact equivalents, or parts that don't meet spec, such as a lower grade) once manufacturing begins. Anything from resistors to SoC. Sometimes it happens due to zero availability (someone didn't order the parts, or the JIT scheduling failed again). :rolleyes:

    2. Poor assembly. Multiple issues here. Bad solder joints, as it was done too fast, mixed solder (mostly occurred during ROHS compliance), or the equipment wasn't set correctly (too cold). Bad batches of boards (etching wasn't clean). Humans aren't consistent... All of this is part of QC (assembly side).

    3. Machining. In the cases of metal, the bits aren't replaced when worn, and it's being processed too fast. Parts won't meet tolerances, but get used anyway. In the case of polymers, dies are used past their service life, again, won't meet tolerance. Process it too fast, and you get shrinkage. Just as bad.
    It ends up with parts that won't mate up properly.

    4. Testing. It's too inadequate. A "power on" test is basically useless, if no other testing is performed. This seems to becoming commonplace, and product quality suffers for it. :(

    5. Division. To me, this is a big one. The various phases of design, testing, manufacturing, and quality control don't communicate well, if at all. They aren't able to work hand-in-hand, as everything is farmed out to OEM/ODM's, usually as separate contracts. This prevents issues from being caught early, before making it into final products.

    These events always seem to center on attempts to save money. Some of it's intentional, some by circumstance. My observations at least. ;)
     
  11. RexTraverse macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    #12
    I was pretty sure they wouldn't release this as an UltraSharp design and that 2ms response time proves it.

    The problem with this design, and it applies to all the Apple Cinema Displays is, while they look very nice aesthetically, you lose a lot of freedom of movement. You can't adjust the height of the screen, the horizontal rotation, or swivel into portrait mode while it is still attached to the base.

    Also, a QC argument gets pretty weak with monitors, imo. Neither Apple nor Dell are making the display itself - it's probably gonna be Samsung, Sharp, or LG Philips. Okay, Apple's brushed metal and glass is probably gonna beat Dell's glossy plastic in QC, but the quality of the screen? Out of their hands.
     

Share This Page