Possible Safety Issue w/MagSafe 2

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by NotAdvisable, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. NotAdvisable macrumors regular

    NotAdvisable

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    #1
    Hey guys!

    So don't ask me why, but last night while I was bored out of my mind I grabbed my MagSafe 2 cord and put it to my lips...

    SHOCK!

    ... it electrocuted me! It wasn't too bad, but it did hurt.

    I assume my lip connected the several pins together, making it think the connector was attached to a MacBook.

    So my question arises, even though we're talking about 20 volts here it's running at 4.25 amps - which can kill someone. Isn't this a safety concern?

    Thanks guys - hopefully you don't laugh too hard at me ;)
     
  2. pat park macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Location:
    California
    #2
    I'm laughing.

    The over sharing of random thoughts online really amazes me sometimes.
     
  3. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Location:
    Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
    #3
    Damian Pilot, IT Professional & Developer
    █ Retina Macbook Pro (Mid 2012, 15", 2.6GHz i7, 8GB / 512GB)
    █ iPad (Fourth Generation, 32GB, Black) & iPhone 4S (32GB, Black)....REALLY?:eek:
     
  4. costabunny macrumors 68020

    costabunny

    Joined:
    May 15, 2008
    Location:
    Weymouth, UK
    #4
    My mummy taught me not to go putting silly things in my mouth.

    I do hope you can resist the urge to molest any other household electrical items as I am guessing toasters and blenders will retaliate with more than a little shock.

    :confused:
     
  5. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #5
    Just a suggestion...when it's really cold outside, don't stick your tongue on a metal pole to see if it will freeze to the pole...IT WILL!

    I only offer this since your spirit of experimentation seems to be a bit overdeveloped.;)
     
  6. Comeagain? macrumors 68020

    Comeagain?

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    #6
    Yeah... Licking your power cord is NotAdvisable.

    Oh , and you weren't Electrocuted. Electrocuted means death.
     
  7. sjinsjca macrumors 68000

    sjinsjca

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    #7
    I have a battery charger for my car, and I've wondered the same thing. Will you test it for me please?
     
  8. NotAdvisable thread starter macrumors regular

    NotAdvisable

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    #8
    Yup, to your shock I'm actually a pilot that also works part-time in a IT department. Scary, aye?

    My mum told me that too, but I didn't listen :(

    I've got a track record too! When I was a kid, I owned a train set pumping out 12v DC - got shocked from that too. Ouch! :(

    You deserve an internet for this.

    "Shocked" then.

    But seriously guys, I'm trying not to sound like an incompetent fool.
    Using a volt meter it seems like the charger sends an initial current and then the computer controls how much current is required to either charge the battery or to keep the battery full.
    I'm just saying, this small shock could prove fatal for those with pacemakers or heart conditions.

    Make fun of me all you want, but I thought that Apple would have developed a safer charger than what they have.
     
  9. 537635, Aug 4, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2013

    537635 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    #9
    20 volts and 4 amps of DC won't kill anyone. Try touching the connector with dry hands. No effect.
    Licking it - is another matter. Saliva has electrolytes!

    Pacemakers are located well under the skin, usually under the right clavicle bone. Tough little machines actually. Designed with clumsy people in mind.

    To put it into your perspective. As for low DC currents, imagine your skin as the hull of the plane. Farraday's cage. Lightning strike might be unpleasant, even dangerous, but no way people inside would get electrocuted.
     
  10. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #10
    Hey... us pilots need to know how our equipment operates as designed... and also in any situation that nature, human behavior, or fate my throw at us. Our lives depend on it.

    From my POV... sticking a power charger in ones mouth may be a good learning experience... so we can know what to do in an emergency. However, I would not make that a regular "pre-flight" step before reading each email. ;)

    /Jim
     
  11. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Location:
    日本
    #11
    Great, now we get another warning label on the charger:

    don't kiss or lick the connector​
     
  12. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #12
    You're right that it could cause harm. But do you really think a package warning that says "Do Not Put MagSafe Connector In Your Mouth While Plugged In" makes sense. And how can you have a risk free charger? It has to carry current...what could conceivably be done to eliminate all risk?

    I'm not being facetious...it's a serious question.:D
     
  13. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Location:
    日本
    #13
    Make the distance between hot pins larger then the average tongue/lips. :cool: practical ? Not sure.

    But seriously: Apple is good in design of smart connectors. They could implement a chip first discussing with a connected MB and release the current after confirming its really a MB and not a tongue.
     
  14. RCAFBrat macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Location:
    Montreal, QC
    #14
    I believe that the effect on safety is influenced as much by path as it is current.

    While very little current is needed to cause serious harm, from a practical point of view the effects will be localized with the contacts close to one another; I believe the extreme opposite and more serious problem (assuming any current even flows given low voltage and high resistance of dry skin per previous comments) would be to grab the hot with one hand and the neutral with the other such that current flows through vital organs!
     
  15. Acorn, Aug 5, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013

    Acorn macrumors 68020

    Acorn

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Location:
    macrumors
    #15
    I have an electronics book that talks about current and stuff and it has you touch your tongue as a serious experiment to a 9 volt battery. It made me think of that for some reason.

    I remember doing the 9 volt thing as a child and if i recall correctly it wasnt so much a shock that i got but more of a bad taste then anything really. or maybe that bad taste was the shock who knows.
     
  16. zone23 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    #16
    I think the real safety issue is a standard outlet! Have you ever licked one of those? WOW! what a shock that will give you..

    Ya I stuck the power cord in my mouth and got shocked.. real shocker.. anything else we need to know?
     
  17. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #17
    All things considered, I'm not sure giving anybody any ideas to test out is a such a great idea! :p

    :D ;)
     
  18. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Location:
    日本
    #18
    Maybe the right and only way to achieve enlightenment :confused: :D;)
     
  19. Acorn macrumors 68020

    Acorn

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    Location:
    macrumors
    #19
    i think standard lamps and outlets are worse. you could basically die. when i was a kid we had this old stove with a power socket in it. i had this little nightlight i wanted to plug in. i was maybe 7. when i went to plug the nightlight in i was touching the prongs and got a nasty zap. it actually threw me backwards into a wall. it was nasty. I was lucky my heart didnt stop.
     

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