Possibly silly question...but...

Discussion in 'iPad' started by Ak8s, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. Ak8s macrumors newbie

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    Mar 17, 2010
    #1
    Since this is my first apple product, I don't know the answer. *blush*

    Does Apple ship an item with a charged battery, or will I be forced to stare at it for a couple of hours while it charges before I can play with it?

    -Angie-
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #2
    It will most likely be charged, as with all current and former Apple products.
     
  3. Ak8s thread starter macrumors newbie

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  4. Jaro65 macrumors 68040

    Jaro65

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    #4
    It will most likely be charged so you can use it right away.
     
  5. iMJustAGuy macrumors 68020

    iMJustAGuy

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    #5
    From what I remember, it seems that devices are usually 75% or so charged. But PLEASE PLEASE if you can, charge it fully before you use it. I have heard in the past that draining a battery that has never been charged before overcharging it for the first time lowers the max capacity for the product. Ex: If you do this your "max" charge may only be 85-90% of what the battery was originally capable of. I did this to my 5G iPod Video back in the day.

    All in all if you can, overcharge it the first time before draining the battery.
     
  6. aaquib macrumors 65816

    aaquib

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    #6
    Yep, I've heard this too. To maximize the life of your iPad battery, it'd be wise to recharge it completely (I mean 100% completely) to ensure that the battery lasts the greatest time possible.
     
  7. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #7
    Sounds like something that someone pulled out of his anus. Old Ni-Cad batteries had issues with charge memory. They would learn to hold only as much charge as the user requested of them. If you discharged them only by 10% capacity before a recharge, then they would learn to hold only 10% of their rated charge capacity. A deep discharge, however, would restore the battery's capacity. You avoid memory issues with Ni-Cads by avoiding a set pattern to their usage. Ni-Cads could also explode, but I digress....

    That's Ni-Cads. Apple does not use Ni-Cads. Its batteries have a recommended number of charge cycles. They are not adversely affected by patterned or shallow-discharge cycles. Modern batteries don't give a flip if you don't top-off their charges before first use.
     
  8. danlovaj macrumors regular

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    May 9, 2009
    #8
    Yes, what he said...You don't have to worry about it with new batteries. I believe the iPad uses a Lithium polymer type battery?
     
  9. iMJustAGuy macrumors 68020

    iMJustAGuy

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    #9
    My statement has nothing to do with Ni-Cad batteries.
     
  10. applesupergeek macrumors 6502a

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    Nov 20, 2009
    #10
    well ni-cad is the the only batteries it applies to, nevertheless.
     
  11. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

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    #11
    Actually Lithium batteries do have a form of "reverse memory" to NiCd's. It is best to keep Lithium as close to fully charged as possible because crystals grow in dead cells and permanently limit the amount of charge it will hold. This is unrelated to the device being new but you should always and often charge your device to maintain battery life with one exception. Because of their volatility Lithium's have complex monitoring systems to keep from over charging (unlike NiCd that fill up with energy and stop, Lithium's will charge until they have so much energy they can catch on fire or explode). About once ever 1 to 3 months you should fully discharge to help keep this in sync. other than that you should if at all possible never let your battery fully discharge.
     
  12. ThatsMeRight macrumors 68020

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    #12
    I guess the iPad will just go off when there's only a few percent left, just like with the iPhone.
     
  13. applesupergeek macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    Thanks for the heads up wasn't aware of that. Do you mean fully discharge as in that 5% that os x informs you say of the impending battery drain, or 0%?
     
  14. iMJustAGuy macrumors 68020

    iMJustAGuy

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    #14
    I would say as much as possible. Like the poster said though, only once every couple of months is necessary.
     
  15. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

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    #15
    Yes, just remember this is actually bad for the battery but necessary for the charging/monitoring circuit. So many people shorten their battery life by fully (or mostly) discharging before every recharge. Never miss a chance to recharge you battery no matter how little you have used it. In general Lithium's are good for only about 300 complete charging cycles (with reduced lifespan after every full discharge). By charging often you can increase this number substantially and maintain a longer lasting battery.
     
  16. pirateRACE macrumors 6502

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    #16
    hmmm.... i guess i'll just do whatever works. :confused:

    (and save $99 for a battery replacement in a couple years!)
     
  17. ciaran00 macrumors 6502

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    #17
    It works off the AC power. You can use it while it charges. :rolleyes:
     
  18. Alectric macrumors regular

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    Dec 2, 2009
    #18
    I'm into radio controlled monster trucks that use lithium polymer batteries (lipos for short). In order to get the longest life from these, I charge them to 60% when storing for more than a couple weeks. This is why most companies selling products with lipos are charging them to about this capacity before shipping. It is also recommended that they be fully charged before first use.

    Lipos can be charged with any amount of capacity exsisting. The biggest problem with lipos are there stablity under an extream discharge. If you were to discharge a single cell lipo anywhere below 3 volts, it could catch on fire or even explode. All divices using lipos requirer a LVC (Low Voltage Cutoff).

    No such thing as a silly question.
    Hope this was helpful. :apple:
     
  19. iMJustAGuy macrumors 68020

    iMJustAGuy

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    #19
    Oh Jesus, don't say that.
    Knowing the people in these forums.........
     
  20. Alectric macrumors regular

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    Dec 2, 2009
    #20
    Well, ok I see your point.:eek:
     
  21. Ak8s thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Mar 17, 2010
    #21
    Brilliant! Problem solved LOL
     
  22. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #22
    The batteries in the iPad are not replaceable.
     
  23. wackymacky macrumors 68000

    wackymacky

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    #23
    I wish people wouldn't just make stuff up.

    Apple clearly states that they will replace a battery if faulty under warrenty. Outside warrenty they charge $99.00 to replace.

    Undoubtly people will do it them self (with 3rd party batteries), though it will likely require a steady hand and balls of steel to pull your shiny iPad appart with a screwdriver to do the job.
     
  24. Seo macrumors regular

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    Cupertino, California
    #24
    Actually, Apple just replaces your iPad entirely (gives you a new one). As long as there are no problems other than the battery, it's like trading your iPad in for a new one.
     

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