Power Consumption while screen brightness is minimum

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by bmvakili, Feb 26, 2009.

  1. bmvakili macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    #1
    The title is the question.

    How to calculate the regular MacBook power consumption if it is left on lowest screen brightness for about 12 hours, plugged in, with just a browser running Gmail?

    Thanks in advance for your input.

    The following is the System Profiler->Power Information that pertains to this topic:


    Battery Information:
    Model Information:
    Serial Number: DP-xxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx
    Manufacturer: DP
    Device name: xxxxxxx
    Pack Lot Code: 0002
    PCB Lot Code: 0000
    Firmware Version: 0110
    Hardware Revision: 0500
    Cell Revision: 0102
    Charge Information:
    Charge remaining (mAh): 4831
    Fully charged: Yes
    Charging: No
    Full charge capacity (mAh): 4831
    Health Information:
    Cycle count: 188
    Condition: Good
    Battery Installed: Yes
    Amperage (mA): 147
    Voltage (mV): 12604

    System Power Settings:

    AC Power:
    System Sleep Timer (Minutes): 0
    Disk Sleep Timer (Minutes): 10
    Display Sleep Timer (Minutes): 20
    Automatic Restart On Power Loss: No
    Wake On AC Change: No
    Wake On Clamshell Open: Yes
    Wake On LAN: Yes
    Display Sleep Uses Dim: Yes
    Battery Power:
    System Sleep Timer (Minutes): 5
    Disk Sleep Timer (Minutes): 10
    Display Sleep Timer (Minutes): 1
    Wake On AC Change: No
    Wake On Clamshell Open: Yes
    Display Sleep Uses Dim: Yes
    Reduce Brightness: Yes

    Hardware Configuration:
    UPS Installed: No

    AC Charger Information:
    Connected: Yes
    Charging: No
     
  2. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #2
    MiniBatteryLogger show the current amperage draw. I don't know: is that what you want?

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #3
    Do you want P = IV (Power = current x voltage)???

    If you do, grab a calculator and be my guest. "Amperage" is the same thing as "current". Also, divide your answer by 1000000 (1 million) so that you calculate Power with the correct units.
     
  4. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #4
    Shouldn't it be divide by 1000, since milli- = one-thousandth?
     
  5. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #5
    But in his 1st post, both Voltage and current are reported in "milli"-units. Multiply them together, and he'd have to divide by 10^6 to adjust for it.
     

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