Power Mac G5 - Three LED Flashes with Good RAM (A Case Study)

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by iMacC2D, Nov 24, 2013.

  1. iMacC2D, Nov 24, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  2. zackkmac macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Location:
    Tulsa
    #2
    This information is gold. And I highly appreciate it as I have a G5 that is dead due to this exact problem. I have a working logic board but can't change it out until my tools arrive.

    Would be great if I could repair the existing board using the wonderful info you've provided but I don't have experience with things like that. :eek:
     
  3. noodle654, Nov 24, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013

    noodle654 macrumors 68020

    noodle654

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2005
    Location:
    Never Ender
    #3
    Wow man this is some amazing information, thank you for sharing this. My G5 DP 1.8GHz recently died from this...tried the reflow and while it worked it didn't work long enough before it died and I sold it off.

    Now that you highlighted the backside heatsink on the logic board all of this makes perfect sense to me. Right now it is the hottest part of my DC G5, it never drops below 130F.
     
  4. ouimetnick macrumors 68020

    ouimetnick

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    Beverly, Massachusetts
    #4
    Very good write up. Thanks for the extra information that you found from trying. :)
     
  5. California, Nov 28, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 28, 2013

    California macrumors 68040

    California

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2004
    #5
    That's interesting but remember there are specific ram standards for Powermac G5's. When I owned that same machine, I had to buy brand new ram to make it work and even with eight gigs of ram it was too slow anyway. Worked my way up to a Quad.

    The idea that a reflow is needed makes sense and there used to be a company in Arizona who would reflow the broken memory slots on Powerbook G4's, they would reflow the video chips on iBook G4s and probably (if they are still in business) would reflow the boards on these PMG5s.

    Still PMG5s were ridiculously notorious and picky about memory. The need to seat the ram chips in matched pairs, in ascending or descending order of size, was also a pain.
     

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