Powermac 7.2 2x1.8 2.5gb ram @100euro, worth it?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by ombrenelcielo, May 13, 2011.

  1. ombrenelcielo macrumors regular

    ombrenelcielo

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2011
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #1
    Hi,
    I have tue chance to get at around 100 euros a used powermac from 2004.
    It's the 7.2 revision with two 1.8 G5 processors.

    I thought to get it to build a small workstation for home or to mod it keeping only the case and fitting into some more recent stuff to make it run as a mac-pro-like computer.

    Should I get it or not at 100 euros?
     
  2. mgartner0622 macrumors 65816

    mgartner0622

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2010
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    #2
    That's an average price.
    G5 machines are becoming increasingly outdated and are losing support very quickly. I'd only buy it if you feel you really need it.
    Also, remember that you're limited by the video card and RAM you can put into it. There is only a certain percentage of Mac Pro "likeness" you can get out of that machine.
     
  3. iLucas macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Location:
    Indiana
    #3
    Thats a decent deal.
    You can put 8GB of ram in the 1.8 Dual.
    I myself have the same machine with 4GB ram and I think its a great machine.
    You can run leopard smoothly and if you're okay with running software thats 2 years old now then it'll be a nice machine for you.
     
  4. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    Georgia
    #4
    As for modding the case mind you it can take quite a while. I spent 20+ hours modding my G5 case to fit ATX parts. Since you have to fabricate mounts, figure out how to strip down the case, modify an ATX motherboard tray and rewire the front panel so that the USB, Firewire, Audio Jack, Power button and LED work. You also have to plan out part placement and cuts to allow good air flow to all components.

    A G4 case is easier. That conversion took me about 8 hours. Though it is tough to find a micro-ATX board that will allow you to still make use of an optical drive.
     

Share This Page